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Forum topic by CWWoodworking posted 03-07-2019 04:47 AM 671 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CWWoodworking

789 posts in 952 days


03-07-2019 04:47 AM

I may have a source for live edge slabs in the 12-18” range.

With my current business, end tables would be perfect.

My question is they are air dried. How long does it take to fully air dry? Or should I have it kiln dried?

I am willing to use just an oil finish on this if that makes difference.

This is out of my comfort zone if it hasn’t already shown.


11 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2437 posts in 936 days


#1 posted 03-07-2019 12:01 PM

what kind of wood is it and how thick ??

that sounds like a good find – if it were me, and I was not sure of the
product, and I had the means, I would kiln dry it anyway – just to be sure.
this could be a great addition to your product line.
I keep seeing the rule of thumb that it normally takes one year per one inch
of thickness to properly “air dry”.
natural drying checks and cracks with an assortment of ornamental Bowties
and Butterflies can only enhance the character of the piece.

.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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CWWoodworking

789 posts in 952 days


#2 posted 03-07-2019 12:34 PM

1-2” cherry.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2437 posts in 936 days


#3 posted 03-07-2019 01:14 PM

when were the trees and slabs cut ?
how are they stored now by the source you will buy them from ?
cherry is a beautiful wood when properly finished.
[I just bought a board for a display case I am building].

if you are selling anything made of naturally processed wood, I would find a way
to kill any possible bugs and eggs that may be hibernating in the wood. (just a thought).
a home-made kiln is not that hard to build or operate for a small scale operation.

.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View Jeff Heath's profile

Jeff Heath

107 posts in 3843 days


#4 posted 03-07-2019 01:39 PM

I have been working with air dried wood for over 20 years. Every species is different. Cherry is one of my favorite woods to work, and to look at. That being said, it’s also high susceptible to movement and checking during drying, and the bugs absolutely love it. At the end of the drying cycle, from my drying shed, I move wood into my shop, where the environment is controlled, and is dry. I allow it to reach equilibrium with the shop environment before working it. Sometimes, this can take months.

The fast and easy way out for you is to find a kiln operator who can sterilize the cherry you have(want to buy), so you don’t have to worry about selling tables to customers that will be filled with bugs. That’s a nightmare waiting to happen, and the best way I know to destroy a budding woodworking business.

-- Jeff Heath

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

289 posts in 481 days


#5 posted 03-16-2019 05:55 AM

Hmm, as a novice I have never thought about the risk of my wood to have bugs in it. When thinking about it its quite obvious.

But how do I know that the wood I buy on the warehouse does not have bug in it?
When I for example get 2×8” of white oak or beech?

Or maybe the right question is, how do I assure that my finished pice does not have bugs in it?

As a amature it’s not a likely option to send it off to someone else, and I do not know anyone in my area who could do it anyway…

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1635 posts in 3567 days


#6 posted 03-16-2019 01:34 PM

There are a lot of articles on how to kiln dry with just a dehumidifier and plastic sheeting. The dehumidifier takes out moisture and blows out hot dry air. Put it under the plastic with a hose to drain the water outside the tent. There is info out there as to drying rate and time. Drying can’t be too rapid.

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

289 posts in 481 days


#7 posted 03-16-2019 01:43 PM

Do kiln drying remove the bugs?

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1804 posts in 3633 days


#8 posted 03-16-2019 03:18 PM

No, the process of drying the wood does not ensure you don’t have an infestation. Once the wood reaches the target moisture level heat treatment (heating the wood to ~!45 degrees F and holding it at that temp for several hours is required to kill the bugs and eggs…

A good source for a lot of info in this area is the forums at forestryforum.com

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Jeff Heath's profile

Jeff Heath

107 posts in 3843 days


#9 posted 03-17-2019 03:41 PM

Some bugs won’t eat dry wood, so they leave once the wood is below a certain MC point. Other bugs, like PPB, love dry wood.

The only way to be sure is with heat. The internal temperature of the lumber has to reach approx. 135°, and stay there for about 30 minutes. This means the overall time to get all the wood evenly to that temperature is usually in the 4 to 6 hour range. You need a kiln with heat added to do that. No type of dehumidification, vacuum, or solar kiln will get there without adding a heat source.

Bug infestations are usually identified by the piles of sawdust and frass left behind by their tunneling, as well as the holes in the wood.

-- Jeff Heath

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3084 posts in 2571 days


#10 posted 03-17-2019 04:19 PM

Why do we call wood with the bark “live edge”.
It doesn’t make sense to me.

-- Aj

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2437 posts in 936 days


#11 posted 03-17-2019 04:44 PM

then again, powderpost beetles are not too picky about their next lunch.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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