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Glue for end grain

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Forum topic by CWWoodworking posted 03-07-2019 12:44 AM 469 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 598 days


03-07-2019 12:44 AM

I make quite a few of these a year and for various reasons, end grain glueing is necessary.

Currently using regular wood glue, “priming” is once, then more glue, wait to dry.

Had a few fail here and there, and was wondering if there is a better glue to use?

Just a preface, I make a couple thousand of these a year. Failure rate is at about 1%. I am willing to live with that if the fix involves more labor.

Being “American made”, my customers ask for perfection. So that’s the reason for the question.


7 replies so far

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WoodenDreams

623 posts in 330 days


#1 posted 03-07-2019 02:24 AM

Have you tried Titebond Quick and Thick. Being a thicker glue, may not lose the glue in the grain. Can you change your cuts to where your gluing the edge instead of end grain. Since your painting the décor. Or maybe put a biscuit in the end grain (quicker than a dowel).

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CWWoodworking

528 posts in 598 days


#2 posted 03-07-2019 02:35 AM

No, thank you. Haven’t tried that.

I’ve tried various cutting patterns. End grain ends up being slightly better.

The wood is 3” thick pine that is dried 15-20%. It’s not perfect to begin with.

I’ll try the quick and thick.

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therealSteveN

3101 posts in 993 days


#3 posted 03-07-2019 05:05 AM

End grain is thirsty. You seem to know this I think. Your “priming” sounds like glue sizing where you glue just the end, allow it to skim over, then add more glue, and clamp. So it sounds like you know the drill about how to try to do it.

Best case scenario is if you can use a crossing piece to add some face grain, IE: Loose tenon, biscuit, dowel, etc etc.

If all else fails see above and read description. If you call Franklin, and ask them, the answer I got was.

Titebond No-Run, No-Drip Wood Glue is the thickest, fastest-drying glue available for use with porous and semi-porous materials.

They are calling end grain a simple porous surface. Heheheh. I said yeah right, then it worked. I guess I’ll see for sure in 10, 20 years.

Franklin International
2020 Bruck Street
Columbus, Ohio 43207
Phone: 1.800.877.4583
Fax: 614.445.1813

I’d start with.

Technical Support
Phone: 1.800.877.4583
Fax: 614.445.1295

Or

Customer Service
Phone: 1.800.669.4583
Fax: 1.800.879.4553

Really nice folks, and believe me they don’t want to tell you stuff, where you may get mad and speak poorly of them, or their products. The kind of company you would want to deal with.

-- Think safe, be safe

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WoodenDreams

623 posts in 330 days


#4 posted 03-07-2019 05:22 AM

If your painting the decor, could add wood V-Nails, the type used for picture frame, they come in different sizes. https://www.hobbylobby.com/Art-Supplies/Project-Supplies/Mat-Cutting/Hard-Wood-V-Nails/p/5544 or try the Corrugated

nails

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1078 posts in 2704 days


#5 posted 03-07-2019 05:39 AM

If you are gluing end grain to edge grain, this may help:

It’s from 9/2004 Wood Magazine.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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WoodenDreams

623 posts in 330 days


#6 posted 03-07-2019 05:40 AM

The Corrugated Nial will work fine.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

497 posts in 199 days


#7 posted 03-07-2019 11:32 AM

You can try the various glues, but since the piece has a back that is not seen, just run a channel through it and put in a spline.

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