LumberJocks

Router: Milwaukee vs Triton

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by CMWx2 posted 03-05-2019 12:57 PM 1814 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CMWx2's profile

CMWx2

27 posts in 1128 days


03-05-2019 12:57 PM

Looking to get a Router mainly for table top use. I do like that both have the ability to be plunge also. I have narrowed it down to these two brands:
Milwaukee 5616 & 5625 vs Triton TRA001 & MOF001

Milwaukee 5616 Pros: 1. Comes in a combo deal with plunge ability for $267 2. Love the above table adjustment! 3. Like the body grip 4. Variable Speed soft start 5. Has face plate that can take GUIDE BUSHINGS 6. Has vacuum attachment

Milwaukee 5616 Cons: Takes 2 wrenches to change router bits

Triton Pros: 1. Can plunge and be fixed 2. Love the above table adjustment 3. Love the 1 wrench to change router bits(cool how it locks in place above table) 4. Variable Speed soft start

Triton Cons: 1. The dust shield seems not to work or be an odd size to get hose to mount to it. 2. Not sure i like having to take the Spring in and out to be able to plunge 3. I do not see it having a face plate that can be used with GUIDE BUSHINGS

What do you guys think that have used either of thee Routers. I seem to like the Milwaukee more except for how it take 2 wrenches to change bits. That does seem annoying but is that enough to justify getting the Triton? _


20 replies so far

View t3steve's profile

t3steve

30 posts in 973 days


#1 posted 03-05-2019 02:58 PM

I have the Milwaukee 5625 in my router table. That’s the one you want.
But I have a separate router for hand held use.

I guess though if you only want one router having two seperate bases would be a good alternative.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4556 posts in 2565 days


#2 posted 03-05-2019 03:06 PM

I purchased the Triton TRA001 for router table use about 2 years ago. My main reasons for buying it were the built in above table height adjustment and the ability to change bits above the table.

But there is a known issue with them is the backlash or slack that develops in the height adjustment. This results in the collet dropping when the lock lever is released. The response I got from Triton tech support: “its the nature of the beast”. They gave me the option of sending it to a repair shop, but I declined because I think its a design issue, not a defective gear.

This may not be an issue but for others, but for me it was a huge PITA trying to dial in a bit height. I tried various “fixes” and suggestions from others, such as using a dial indicator, but this doesn’t work for me and my methods.

I ended up buying a router lift and new router and so far I am much, much happier, although I didn’t want to spend the money.

If you’re interested, its the Jessem MastRLift II and the Jessem router w/external speed control. Its really a very nice setup, but it will set you back a bit.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

764 posts in 2816 days


#3 posted 03-05-2019 03:07 PM

I have been using the 2.25 hp Triton for at least 10 years. I’ve never used the Milwaukee routers—but they are probably very good routers.

The dust shield has worked well for me—no complaints.

I have a Festool hose (27mm) that fits the opening very well—I bought it for my Festool sander, but it fits the router and my DeWalt plate joiner as well.

My Triton router came in a kit with a case, edge guide, and guide bushings as well as an adapter that can take a Porter Cable style guide bushing.

I use the Triton router in the router table primarily—and this is where you need to remove the spring. If you use it as a handheld plunge router—you need the spring in the router. The spring helps return the heavy router body to the top of its travel. When it is mounted upside down in a router table gravity helps it return to the bottom of its travel. If you leave the spring in when it is mounted in the table—then the spring adds resistance to the mechanism that adjusts the height of the bit. The spring is not difficult to remove—takes maybe 3 minutes and Phillips head screwdriver.

One thing to be aware of is that some Triton owners are reporting that when they have the router mounted in a table and they release the height adjustment lock that the router is slipping out of adjustment. This would make it almost impossible to make test cuts and slight adjustments in an effort to sneak up on the right depth. I have not experienced this issue, but there are several people who are reporting this—something to keep in mind.

I like this router and I would buy it again. I bought it because I wanted a dual purpose router (table and handheld plunge) and primarily because of how well it did in the FWW review many years ago. I think it works very well in a router table—the on/off switch is a little odd—but no big deal. As a plunge router it has a smooth controllable plunge action, but it feels a little top heavy to me.

If you buy it for the router table—shop around for a router plate as well before you buy it. I have an older plate from Pinnacle—that I think is no longer made. It came with a set of aluminium twist-lock rings—they all seem to be plastic now. The Woodpecker's plate looks almost the same (it has the above table winder hole) except for the color.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7258 posts in 2805 days


#4 posted 03-05-2019 03:24 PM

I too have the Milwaukee 5625. It has variable speed soft start, with a wrench you can use it like a router lift and the motor base locks around the motor solid. The above the table bit change would be the only advantage I can see with the big Triton.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View CMWx2's profile

CMWx2

27 posts in 1128 days


#5 posted 03-05-2019 03:31 PM

How is it changing the Bits with the Milwaukee 2 Wrenches? Is it a PITA or not really a big deal?


I have the Milwaukee 5625 in my router table. That s the one you want.
But I have a separate router for hand held use.

I guess though if you only want one router having two seperate bases would be a good alternative.

- t3steve


View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1805 posts in 3933 days


#6 posted 03-05-2019 06:15 PM

All of my PC’s (3), table and hand held are 2 wrench changes. I like the 2 wrenches as I think I KNOW when it’s properly torqued.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View bluestyle11's profile

bluestyle11

7 posts in 3123 days


#7 posted 03-05-2019 06:32 PM

I too have the Milwaukee 5625 in my router table, but I also have a separate router for hand held use. I have the bases for it, but never used them. I have a couple trim routers and a Ryobi plunge router for the handheld, which is quite decent as well.

Changing bits is simple and quick. It is a beast in the table and with sharp bits gives flawless results.

I would highly recommend it.

View t3steve's profile

t3steve

30 posts in 973 days


#8 posted 03-05-2019 06:38 PM

I release it out its base and change bits on top of the table , super simple.


How is it changing the Bits with the Milwaukee 2 Wrenches? Is it a PITA or not really a big deal?

- CMWx2


View CMWx2's profile

CMWx2

27 posts in 1128 days


#9 posted 03-05-2019 06:45 PM

Sweet! Thanks!


I release it out its base and change bits on top of the table , super simple.

How is it changing the Bits with the Milwaukee 2 Wrenches? Is it a PITA or not really a big deal?

- CMWx2

- t3steve


View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1731 posts in 3671 days


#10 posted 03-05-2019 07:12 PM

I have the triton 31/4 hp in a table no issues. The backlash you get use to and isn’t a problem. I also have a Bosch router and a PC 690 both mounted in a Kreg lift at one time or another. The two wrenches is also not a problem. The Triton uses one wrench and the bit for door making are a matched set so once the height is set rail and stile bits require no further adjustment as well as the raised panel bit. I just change bit because it requires no adjust of height for any of the three.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6987 posts in 3577 days


#11 posted 03-05-2019 07:50 PM

I use a 5625 in my table (with a lift) and have no problem with the wrenches. I did bend one at about a 45˚ to make it a little easier to use. But you guys with the Triton in the table can comment on this: I have a Triton I use in my FMT. That safety gate you have to slide aside to turn it on would be a big problem (I think) in a table.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8418 posts in 4460 days


#12 posted 03-05-2019 08:22 PM

Both of my Milwaukee 5615 combo and 5625 get really high marks for build quality, feel, power, and the plunge base for both are excellent. Both were made in the USA, but I don’t know if that’s the case any more….if so, I’d buy both again in a heart beat.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7694 posts in 1658 days


#13 posted 03-05-2019 08:31 PM

I have 2 of the 3+ Hp Tritons, and one of the smaller ones. I haven’t noted a dust issue with them, the slippage rwe was talking about only occurs when you unlock it, if it occurs. One of my 2, 31/4 routers does, sometimes. the other does not. Like I said it only occurs when I unlatch the router, and I only do that when I’m going to make a change anyhow, so for me it’s not a problem. I have not seen a problem with trying to achieve a bit height though.

Good solid tools, priced right, and a lot of bang for the $$$. Since having such good luck with the routers I bought in for the cordless drill set, and it’s a BEAST.

Fred the way I get around that switch in a router table is I always run a router attached to one of those I socket starters, and a deadman for the power, so I never touch a switch on the router, or the vac to get them running simultaneously.

Deadman foot switch

I started with a on/off switch pedal, but it all hit the fan one day, and in my dodging stuff I didn’t think to step on the pedal again. Swapped to the deadman, and keeping it running at first was weird, once you get used to it, awesome. If something goes South I just walk to safety, and all the spinny parts stop. It’s what you really want to do when it goes weird anyhow.

You really have to remember to unplug it when done, or changing or adjusting bits though, because the router is ON. Those with small kids, would want to think about this arrangement. They see Daddy stepping on the pedal, they may want to mimic. Of course they spend their first 8 years or so reaching up to grab everything they shouldn’t.

I have owned Milwaukee tools for many years, and had an old Hole Hawg, and a Worm drive saw in 7 1/4” and a 10 1/4” circ saw. Loved them. In modern days I don’t feel they are the same rugged tools, and their emphasis has gone cordless, of which I have 12v, and 18v tools and accessories. I was kinda intrigued by that hand strap router they had, but the folks at Pop WWing had a few of them, and they dumped them off for REAL cheap after the Schwarz started working from home. It was just how the rest of the staff went all hands off of them, saying they didn’t like them. I had already felt the name had suffered, just don’t use their corded tools.

-- Think safe, be safe

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

383 posts in 2872 days


#14 posted 03-06-2019 06:13 AM

I have the Triton 2 HP in a router table. Great functionality for bit changes, height adjustments. Unfortunately:


But there is a known issue with them is the backlash or slack that develops in the height adjustment. This results in the collet dropping when the lock lever is released…..... a huge PITA trying to dial in a bit height.

Ditto for me.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4556 posts in 2565 days


#15 posted 03-06-2019 02:15 PM

To steve and woodmaster:

How can the collet drop when unlocking not be a problem?

When you’re trying to dial in a bit, you loose your reference every time.

I guess you can use a height gauge, but then there’s all the numbers to keep track of.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com