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Advice on setting up my workspace?

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Forum topic by Raymer posted 02-28-2019 03:58 AM 600 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raymer

92 posts in 931 days


02-28-2019 03:58 AM

I apologize for the long post in advance and would appreciate anyone willing to read my mumbling to understand where I am coming from. Anyone brave enough to read and respond, I will say a prayer to the dust god to ensure you avoid splinters or dust in your eyes for a solid year!

I could really use some suggestions on how to best make the space I have work for me. I am going to utilize my two car garage for a dedicated woodworking shop. While I have been building storage buildings for about 10 years for extra pocket change, due to an HOA I can’t build myself one big enough for this, so the garage it is.

Here is what I have to work with. I recently took the useless wall hanging cabinets off the walls and built a 12’ row of built ins, so that wall is taken.

The back wall has our second refrigerator, my water softener and a small open space between the two. I went ahead and built the enclosure around the water softener, to not only protect it from dust and whatnot, but most importantly to provide a space on top for some extra storage, which is better than a water softener with no storage above it. I went ahead and built a lumber rack up above this as well.

Then there is the garage door obviously and what’s left is the other wall that is bare now. It’s hard to tell in the pic, but I just put 2 4×8 sheets of 1/2” plywood which I plan to use for french cleats for a bit of tool organizing.

I also sold the 2 10 year old workbenches I built 10 years ago as my first Kreg pocket hole project and am getting ready to build a larger, single bench.

Here is my thoughts:

Somewhat in the center of garage place my new 8’ long work bench at roughly same height as my tablesaw, going long ways with one end towards garage door.

Place tablesaw at the end near garage door, so I can open garage door when I need to rip long pieces, using bench as outfeed table.

I have a Powermatic 18” bandsaw someone is giving me which I thought I would put on that cleared wall, near garage door, so when resawing larger pieces, they can outfeed out of garage.

The work bench will have 2 or 3 separate fliptops for which I will secure a planer to one and jointer to another if I get a benchtop jointer.

The drill press I could put in the spot between the refrigerator and water softener enclosure.

The dust collector will be stationed somewhat where it is in the photo here, but it will be further back closer to that door where the water heater is.

Here is my biggest conundrum. How can I possibly run ductwork for the dust collector for the tablesaw and other tools on the workbench? If I run across the ceiling and drop down over them, the garage door will hit them when opened.

My other thought was to do kind of an L shaped bench that goes over to the cleared wall and run ductwork along under the bench. Don’t really like idea of running ducts along floor exposed, could be a big tripping hazard?

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.


14 replies so far

View clin's profile

clin

1121 posts in 1845 days


#1 posted 02-28-2019 05:48 AM

You could change out your garage door for swinging doors. Then your ceiling is freed up for whatever you want. Getting the door track out of the way is helpful too.

My shop is a single garage bay. I took the existing garage door, similar to yours, and cut the panels in half. I then built a steel frame and mounted the panels in the frame, caulking all the joints etc. I then added additional wood to help secure the panels and various hard points for handles and bolts. Stuffed with rigid foam insulation and put thin plywood on the inside. From the outside it looks very much like the original garage door, just with a seam down the middle.

In the end it is a door with an R-rating about equal to a 2×4 wall. It has weather seals just like any exterior door. I didn’t bother with doors handles on the outside, and just used bolts top and bottom on the inside. Other than the expense, there’s no reason a standard door couldn’t be put back on if needed.

Here’s the inside before adding the plywood.

-- Clin

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 931 days


#2 posted 02-28-2019 12:13 PM



You could change out your garage door for swinging doors. Then your ceiling is freed up for whatever you want. Getting the door track out of the way is helpful too.

My shop is a single garage bay. I took the existing garage door, similar to yours, and cut the panels in half. I then built a steel frame and mounted the panels in the frame, caulking all the joints etc. I then added additional wood to help secure the panels and various hard points for handles and bolts. Stuffed with rigid foam insulation and put thin plywood on the inside. From the outside it looks very much like the original garage door, just with a seam down the middle.

In the end it is a door with an R-rating about equal to a 2×4 wall. It has weather seals just like any exterior door. I didn t bother with doors handles on the outside, and just used bolts top and bottom on the inside. Other than the expense, there s no reason a standard door couldn t be put back on if needed.

Here s the inside before adding the plywood.

- clin

Clin, that is an excellent idea and will look into that. Losing the rails would be great. I know a guy that does garage door sales and installs and he is a sucker for BBQ and a few cold ones.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1941 posts in 3642 days


#3 posted 02-28-2019 01:40 PM

Other than one run across the ceiling near the wall to get around my entry door, my dust ducts run horizontal along the walls about 3 feet high. All my machines except table saw are along the walls.

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

163 posts in 1897 days


#4 posted 02-28-2019 03:38 PM

I took out the garage doors and built some hinged plywood faced doors. I have all machines on rollers, that really helps. Dust collection pipes run along the ceiling. The one station that is stationary is my SCMS / router table against one wall. I have some pictures on my member page.
Good luck with your shop, enjoy the adventure of setting it up.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

405 posts in 1499 days


#5 posted 02-28-2019 08:54 PM

Even though you have already started with some built in storage consider getting the infrastructure of the garage in order before going any farther.
Electricity, lighting, and white (yes white) paint.
If you can do a sub panel think about future electrical needs now.
Climate control, cyclone dust collector, any other dedicated 220v circuit (power tools can share a circuit since you only use one at a time).
20 amp service for all 120v outlets is very nice to have.

I set my big machines up in the middle of the shop as a tool cluster.
The bench top sanders are all in one fixed station along with a downdraft table that helps with the ROS and finish sanders.
The planer is on a rolling tool box by the drill press and it gets moved when I use it.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1647 posts in 2485 days


#6 posted 02-28-2019 11:11 PM

When I was considering building a very small shop out in the back yard, I downloaded a copy of SketchUp and got familiar with it. I was able to draw out crude equipment to scale and then move stuff around until I was happy with the layout. Unfortunately the City squelched my plans and it forced me to use the garage instead.
Like you, I have lot’s to deal with. Washer/Dryer, Water heater, SWMBO’s car.
SketchUp really helped me work out the kinks and get a fairly decent layout going
It was a great tool when I started designing my DC Layout.
I really like to draw stuff out and then move things a round until I get the desired layout I like.

Every tool is now on wheels so my layout can expand or contract as needed.

Here’s a quick look: https://www.lumberjocks.com/fivecodys/workshop

My shop is nothing fancy but maybe it might give you a few ideas.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 931 days


#7 posted 02-28-2019 11:20 PM



When I was considering building a very small shop out in the back yard, I downloaded a copy of SketchUp and got familiar with it. I was able to draw out crude equipment to scale and then move stuff around until I was happy with the layout. Unfortunately the City squelched my plans and it forced me to use the garage instead.
Like you, I have lot s to deal with. Washer/Dryer, Water heater, SWMBO s car.
SketchUp really helped me work out the kinks and get a fairly decent layout going
It was a great tool when I started designing my DC Layout.
I really like to draw stuff out and then move things a round until I get the desired layout I like.

Every tool is now on wheels so my layout can expand or contract as needed.

Here s a quick look: https://www.lumberjocks.com/fivecodys/workshop

My shop is nothing fancy but maybe it might give you a few ideas.

- fivecodys

Thanks for sharing man, that looks great! I’m downloading Sketchup this evening and will play around with it.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View htl's profile

htl

5211 posts in 2008 days


#8 posted 03-01-2019 05:48 PM

Most wood workers go through different types a work, be they cutting lots a sheet goods for cabinets then they make get in to turning or model building, all these can benefit from using a different lay out.
That’s where having most of your tools on wheels helps, you can roll things out of the way or turn them for more clearance.
This is really important at the beginning when your just finding out what you are good at and this usually will have you going in one direction or the other.
I change my shop around a lot so don’t have to have just the right place for everything and bolt it down cause next month or week I may be needing things changed around for some unknown project that needs more space.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

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Holbs

2366 posts in 2878 days


#9 posted 03-01-2019 06:10 PM

Things to consider:
1.) dust collection. 2 stage or single stage. 4” or 6” duct. PVC or HVAC metal ducting. 220v or 110v outlet for motor. DIY blast gates or store bought. Overhead gates and how many branches and how long main. Diagonal pathway or follow the wall.
2.) power. how many 110v and 220v. where to put them. don’t forget any overhead reels (#1 item used in my shop).
3.) insulating garage door, insulating ceiling, insulating walls. I’ve done 2 out of 3 (door & ceiling, not walls).
4.) air cleaner. will need 110v high up on ceiling or high up on walls. place along wall, not in center of garage.
5.) think 3 dimensional when it comes to infeed / outfeed to machines. My 15” planer outfeed is 1” high than my table saw. My assembly table/outfeed table is 1/8” lower than my table saw. My miter saw station is 3” above my table saw outfeed area.
6.) Yep, recolor to bright. I didn’t go white like many did. I went sunrise/sunset yellow cause… well… yellow is totally awesome :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Raymer

92 posts in 931 days


#10 posted 03-01-2019 06:43 PM



Things to consider:
1.) dust collection. 2 stage or single stage. 4” or 6” duct. PVC or HVAC metal ducting. 220v or 110v outlet for motor. DIY blast gates or store bought. Overhead gates and how many branches and how long main. Diagonal pathway or follow the wall.

I just built 2stage, 4” PVC ductwork, 120v, bought the blastgates which I am automating with servos and an Arduino Microcomputer. I’m still working out my duct pathing….

2.) power. how many 110v and 220v. where to put them. don t forget any overhead reels (#1 item used in my shop).

In the process of adding 2 new 20amp and 1 30amp circuits. My garage only had 2 usable outlets so adding several more. I do have a 50’ cord reel I mounted on the ceiling, it’s great and already use it daily.

3.) insulating garage door, insulating ceiling, insulating walls. I ve done 2 out of 3 (door & ceiling, not walls).

I insulated all of my walls before drywall was added, during construction of our house 5 years ago. The garage door is an insulated door and seals nicely. I don’t need to insulate the garage ceiling as our roof and exterior walls have spray in foam insulation. They just didn’t include the exterior garage wall which is why I ran fiberglass in that wall prior to drywall.

4.) air cleaner. will need 110v high up on ceiling or high up on walls. place along wall, not in center of garage.

I have been looking at the Jet unit that will 1050cfms, I missed their sale at $349…but $399 isn’t terrible. It will be a few months before I can do it as other things have priority.

5.) think 3 dimensional when it comes to infeed / outfeed to machines. My 15” planer outfeed is 1” high than my table saw. My assembly table/outfeed table is 1/8” lower than my table saw. My miter saw station is 3” above my table saw outfeed area.

This I need to consider as I build my new workbench over the next couple of weekends.

6.) Yep, recolor to bright. I didn t go white like many did. I went sunrise/sunset yellow cause… well… yellow is totally awesome :)

My walls are a light blue/grey color and no plans to change, but I am going to repaint the flat white ceiling with a Satin white to brighten things up a bit.
- Holbs


-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

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Holbs

2366 posts in 2878 days


#11 posted 03-01-2019 06:56 PM


I have been looking at the Jet unit that will 1050cfms, I missed their sale at $349…but $399 isn t terrible. It will be a few months before I can do it as other things have priority.

- Raymer


Could keep in mind the Wen air filter for saving $$$. Could buy 2 for the price of 1 Jet. One on each side of the shop.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View htl's profile

htl

5211 posts in 2008 days


#12 posted 03-01-2019 08:03 PM

You don’t need all this stuff at once, work you way there as needed one at a time.
Some have the big $$ and can do it all at once, me well setting up a shop is as much fun as building things.
I found this interesting about air filter systems.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View clin's profile

clin

1121 posts in 1845 days


#13 posted 03-01-2019 11:12 PM



I found this interesting about air filter systems.

- htl

I looked at that video on air filters, and it is somewhat misleading, though not intentionally. He claims the box fan moves more air than the filter system. However, that box fan rating is almost certainly when using the fan as intended, in a room with free airflow. Slapping filters on it will bring the CFM down quite a bit because it restricts the airflow. Also, what happens as the filter becomes clogged. I think the squirrel cage fans of commercial units can handle more back pressure then a simple fan can. More than likely the performance of the box fan is less than that of the purpose-built filter. This of course doesn’t mean it doesn’t work, just that it likely isn’t as good as he thinks it is in terms of airflow.

Another thing to consider is filters like the Jet have on-off, 3-speed, and timer control all with a remote. The box fan has no remote and no timer. How important this is depends on how you use it. I have a Jet and use the timer all the time. This allows me to keep it running to clean the air after I leave the shop, yet I don’t have to remember to go back and turn it off.

The remote allows the fan to be positioned higher up out of the way where reaching the on-off speed switch of the fan may be difficult.

Something else to consider is airspeed, not just airflow in CFM. The Jet and similar filters have a much higher airspeed. Their exhaust duct is much smaller for similar or even much more CFM than the box fan. A big part of keeping the air filtered is keeping it stirred up. A higher airspeed will “throw” the air farther across the shop than a lower speed, even for the same CFM. How much this really matters, is certainly debatable, but it’s something to consider when comparing the approaches.

Of course, you could add a timer and even a remote control to a DIY build based on a box fan. But this cuts into the price difference. And like anything, you can choose your battles as far as what you want to spend your time doing.

I’m not trying to argue that one or the other is better, just that there are other aspects to consider when comparing purpose-built filters to a DIY box fan with filter.

-- Clin

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1941 posts in 3642 days


#14 posted 03-01-2019 11:34 PM

Whatever filter you choose, the best collection is at the source. I am happy with my Wen. If using a box fan with a furnace filter, a little cooking spray on the filter will also collect more dust. And garlic flavor spray will freshen the shop and deter vampires.

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