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fixing hairline cracks in vise screws

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Forum topic by kooldecker posted 02-25-2019 08:21 PM 531 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


02-25-2019 08:21 PM

hey guys uncharted waters here, and need a little advice. i recently got an old bench in a killer CL deal. and the vise screws are wood, they are in beautiful shape, but have a few hairline cracks . all run the long way, so im confident that that they will still function. but i want to fill them to get them structurally sound. would thin CA be the ticket? ive never used it before for a crack but just dont know if there is a better product out there. any help would be greatly appreciated! thanks
jason

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"


20 replies so far

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fivecodys

1524 posts in 2180 days


#1 posted 02-26-2019 12:22 AM

Thin CA is what popped into my mind when reading your post. Keep in mind that many things pop into my mind that are not worth much.
I am curious to see what the masses think.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16244 posts in 3163 days


#2 posted 02-26-2019 02:55 AM

I personally wouldn’t do anything to them but use them.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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bgood

35 posts in 270 days


#3 posted 02-26-2019 07:02 AM

Oil the screws for lubrication. They will work to your satisfaction with the cracks.

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ChefHDAN

1484 posts in 3394 days


#4 posted 02-26-2019 02:33 PM



.... i recently got an old bench in a killer CL deal
- kooldecker

No picture???? I didn’t happen

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Lazyman

4113 posts in 1932 days


#5 posted 02-26-2019 02:43 PM

CA is what I would use if you want to fix them but make sure you wipe off any on the outside before it sets so that you don’t have any burrs. Use the thin stuff so that it will seep into the cracks and apply pressure by hand (wear gloves) for a minute or 2 until it sets to close the gaps. I would use the slow setting kind so you have time to apply it along the entire length at once and wipe off any excess. I often use the kind used for finishing wood turnings for filling and closing cracks or breakages in turned items.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


#6 posted 02-26-2019 02:45 PM

i was kindnof hoping sombody would tell me to leave them be. i was just afraid that they might weaken it too badly. i may just do that. thanks smitty and bgood for the advice! as for you dan…....as a fisherman i can totally appreciate your rule as i observe it myself. so go to my two blogs concerning said bench lol. i did one for the gloat. but then started one to journal the rehab!

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

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Robert

3558 posts in 2025 days


#7 posted 02-26-2019 02:46 PM

They are probably just checks.

I would wax them and use them.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


#8 posted 02-26-2019 03:02 PM


i agree about the checks. i just didnt know if i should address them. i was thinking parafin or beeswax for lube? any thoughts?

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


#9 posted 02-26-2019 03:03 PM


i agree about the checks. you really can only see it on the bottom one. the top one that is grain. i just didnt know if i should address them. i was thinking parafin or beeswax for lube? any thoughts?

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4113 posts in 1932 days


#10 posted 02-26-2019 03:15 PM

I saw somewhere (might have been the Woodwright shop?), that tallow was often used as a lubricant for wood tools which is why so many old wooden tools and handplanes often have a thick patina when you find them in an antique shop. In fact they usually kept a grease pot under their benches to keep it close at hand. I wonder if they would have used that on wooden screws too?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


#11 posted 02-26-2019 03:30 PM

it makes total sense to me. but then again i regularly get called an idiot lol. i mean if its good for a plane it should be good for threads right? i just thought the beeswax would be better (thinned a tiny bit with somthing, mabye mineral oil) because it keeps nice and tight especially in hot weather. id honestly love to know more about what they used back in those days. I mean let’s be honest most of the products they use for everything back in those days either cause cancer or killed you outright but darn were they good products !!!LOL

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4113 posts in 1932 days


#12 posted 02-26-2019 03:46 PM

I forgot to add to my previous post…To keep is simple, I would probably just apply a thin layer of paste wax. That way you don’t have worry about getting the right consistency—they’ve already figured it out for you and it is probably less likely to to be gummy and attract sawdust.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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BlasterStumps

1470 posts in 984 days


#13 posted 02-26-2019 03:57 PM

Don’t they use mineral oil to soak the wood in for about a week before cutting the threads? Would that lubricate enough?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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OSU55

2448 posts in 2534 days


#14 posted 02-26-2019 06:20 PM

Not knowing the condition of the wood, I would soak them down in poly thinned 1:1 with ms, kepp them wet for ~10 min, then wipe it off. Repeat for 2-3 coatswithin 24 hrs. Could be the poly wont soak in if there is tallow or wax – I’d probably wipe down with ms first to clean. After the poly cures for a week, 2-3 paste waxings to lube them up.

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kooldecker

79 posts in 2113 days


#15 posted 02-26-2019 06:29 PM

oh the wood is in absolute perfect condition! i think it may be beech. they are hard, ROCK HARD . i literally ran the threads through a wire wheel on a bemch grinder to clean them up. and not only did it NOT hurt them on amy way or show ANY signs of marking them up, it polished them lol. and it was a (heavily broken in but still)steel whire wheel. not brass. its ridiculous how hard and solod these things are for the age

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

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