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Forum topic by Raymer posted 02-25-2019 02:45 PM 1026 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raymer

92 posts in 562 days


02-25-2019 02:45 PM

Well I didn’t do anything special or new, but I got my first decent dust collection setup. I bought the Harbor Freight 2HP system, the HF dust collector accessory kit, Wood River cyclone lid and 30 gallon metal trash can.

I built a simple cart from scrap I had laying around and used the casters that came with the HF DC.

HF DC: $167.00
Accesory kit: $47.00
Cyclone lid: $24.00
Trashcan: $29.00

Total cost: $267 + tax

I was also given 4 10’ pieces of 4” sewer drain which would have cost another $65, but thanks to the guys building out the new neighborhood, they said I could take them so they didn’t have to haul them back.

I tested this thing briefly on my tablesaw and after a dozen cuts or so, I couldn’t see anything in the plastic bag, all went to the trashcan.

The only issue I had initially was the 20amp breakers tripping when turning it on. I spent another $7 and replaced them with 30amp breakers and problem solved.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.


32 replies so far

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1390 posts in 920 days


#1 posted 02-25-2019 03:14 PM

What size wire is now being fed by your new 30 Amp breaker?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

691 posts in 1120 days


#2 posted 02-25-2019 03:20 PM

Great solution. I wish I’d done it that way the first time.
However the breaker upgrade is going to raise some eyebrows unless the wire it feeds is appropriate gage. The breaker protects the wire and the new breaker offers less protection.
The danger isn’t your DC, it’s the next resident who plugs in two space heaters on this 30a circuit. This could cause a fire.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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Raymer

92 posts in 562 days


#3 posted 02-25-2019 03:36 PM


What size wire is now being fed by your new 30 Amp breaker?

- BlasterStumps

Do you mean the size of romex running in the wall? If that is what you mean, I believe it is 12-2, but I will double check.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

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BlasterStumps

1390 posts in 920 days


#4 posted 02-25-2019 03:42 PM

Yes, the size of romex running in the wall.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 562 days


#5 posted 02-25-2019 05:10 PM



Yes, the size of romex running in the wall.

- BlasterStumps

It appears the wire in the wall from the sub panel to the outlets is 12-2…...Oops. I have turned those breakers off and will put the 20 amps back in.

So, now I am back to square one. Can I run romex through the attic and then through conduit on the wall coming through the garage ceiling? I don’t want to cut all the drywall out.

If I leave the 2 circuits at 20amp as wired and then just run a new circuit with 10-2 with a 30amp, isn’t it safe to run the romex down a wall to a metal gang box as long as it’s in conduit?

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5686 posts in 2973 days


#6 posted 02-25-2019 05:26 PM

I have a different thought. A lot of folks run those HF DCs on a 120V/20A circuit with no problem. Is there something else that could be wrong? Maybe you didn’t have any ductwork connected to it and tried it out (that’s a much bigger load on the motor).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View panzer's profile

panzer

6 posts in 839 days


#7 posted 02-25-2019 06:16 PM

Yes, the size of romex running in the wall.

- BlasterStumps

It appears the wire in the wall from the sub panel to the outlets is 12-2…...Oops. I have turned those breakers off and will put the 20 amps back in.

So, now I am back to square one. Can I run romex through the attic and then through conduit on the wall coming through the garage ceiling? I don t want to cut all the drywall out.

If I leave the 2 circuits at 20amp as wired and then just run a new circuit with 10-2 with a 30amp, isn t it safe to run the romex down a wall to a metal gang box as long as it s in conduit?

- Raymer

You really aren’t supposed to run romex in conduit. A easier solution would be to run type MC cable. It is it’s own flexible metal conduit and should be fine exposed in this application. Check your local codes though.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10748 posts in 1619 days


#8 posted 02-25-2019 06:20 PM

Yes, the size of romex running in the wall.

- BlasterStumps

It appears the wire in the wall from the sub panel to the outlets is 12-2…...Oops. I have turned those breakers off and will put the 20 amps back in.

So, now I am back to square one. Can I run romex through the attic and then through conduit on the wall coming through the garage ceiling? I don t want to cut all the drywall out.

If I leave the 2 circuits at 20amp as wired and then just run a new circuit with 10-2 with a 30amp, isn t it safe to run the romex down a wall to a metal gang box as long as it s in conduit?

- Raymer

Yes, you can run the wire through your attic and drop it via conduit to a gang box. At least you can here in VA… Code differs by location though so you might want to verify.

Fred brings up a good point though. You should not be throwing a 20A breaker with your HF blower. Is that the only thing running on that circuit?

If you really do need a 30A, it would be highly unusual in my experience to have a 115V circuit that large. Seems like something is over-loading the blower. Or maybe your 20A breaker is just faulty and you need to replace it with a new 20A breaker? Maybe a slow-tripping variety to allow for the startup inrush current?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Raymer

92 posts in 562 days


#9 posted 02-25-2019 06:31 PM



I have a different thought. A lot of folks run those HF DCs on a 120V/20A circuit with no problem. Is there something else that could be wrong? Maybe you didn t have any ductwork connected to it and tried it out (that s a much bigger load on the motor).

- Fred Hargis

This….yes, it was throwing the breakers, but I didn’t have any ductwork up yet. Didn’t realize that could be a problem.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

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Fred Hargis

5686 posts in 2973 days


#10 posted 02-25-2019 07:24 PM

What happens is the blower is trying to move much more air than it will with the ductwork attached, maybe 2-3 times as much. That would be on top of the bug start up load that the DC has anyway (spinning up that impeller puts a big draw on the circuit.). So all that puts such a load on the motor it will draw enough amps to trip the breaker. If you want to test it, cover the inlet with something and then turn it on. In this case it shouldn’t be moving any air and the motor will essentially loafing along and not drawing too many amps.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1466 posts in 2116 days


#11 posted 02-26-2019 12:27 AM

Another thought. Maybe replace the breaker with a new 20 Amp breaker. Could just be a bad breaker.
Just my 2 cents.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1175 posts in 2041 days


#12 posted 02-26-2019 12:40 AM

If you are using an extension cord, get rid of it. Extension cords cause voltage drop which increases amps. DC should plug directly into wall outlet.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 562 days


#13 posted 02-26-2019 01:00 AM



Another thought. Maybe replace the breaker with a new 20 Amp breaker. Could just be a bad breaker.
Just my 2 cents.

- fivecodys

Good idea, I’ll do that tomorrow, they’re cheap, might as well.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

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Raymer

92 posts in 562 days


#14 posted 02-26-2019 01:02 AM



If you are using an extension cord, get rid of it. Extension cords cause voltage drop which increases amps. DC should plug directly into wall outlet.

- WhyMe

Even using a short 12ga extension cord isn’t good? Where I have a place for my DC, there is no outlet within reach.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

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WhyMe

1175 posts in 2041 days


#15 posted 02-26-2019 01:23 AM

#12 short cord should be fine. If short is 10 – 12ft. I know the manual states what cord can be used but my experience with motor loads, extension cords can cause problems.

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