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Forum topic by Patrickgeddes14 posted 02-23-2019 12:29 AM 205 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Patrickgeddes14

90 posts in 113 days


02-23-2019 12:29 AM

I just acquired the heaviest duty router and will dedicate it to planing oak and walnut slabs. 1/2” shank and the most power available to the public apparently. I’m having trouble finding and selecting the a) largest diameter planing bit (most important) and b) most durable bit. Who knows?


5 replies so far

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TungOil

1143 posts in 793 days


#1 posted 02-23-2019 12:38 AM

Whiteside makes spoilboard cutters with carbide inserts in some pretty large sizes, I imagine others do as well. You should be able to make one of them work. Don’t go too big if you are moving the router by hand using the typical slab flattening rig.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Patrickgeddes14

90 posts in 113 days


#2 posted 02-23-2019 04:29 PM

http://www.carbideprocessors.com/4-wing-carbide-tipped-cnc-spoilboard-cutter-2-dia-1-2-shank-whiteside-6220/

I can put this on my router right? It says cnc wasn’t sure if that means it’s only for a machine

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Patrickgeddes14

90 posts in 113 days


#3 posted 02-23-2019 04:30 PM

And it does surfacec planing right?

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ArtMann

1319 posts in 1114 days


#4 posted 02-23-2019 04:39 PM

That bit should do nicely for you. It is similar to a bit I use on my CNC router. My CNC uses a mid sized Porter Cable router. Just don’t try to do too much at once until you see how it goes.

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Andybb

1797 posts in 901 days


#5 posted 02-23-2019 05:27 PM

Assuming you are going to use a router sled? If so make it very very sturdy so the sled and the rails have ZERO flex. That process creates a lot of chips and is more work than you might imagine. It was fun but after doing a few slabs a couple of years ago I now spend $60 and take the big ones to the mill and let them plane and sand them for me.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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