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Rough sawn side of slab

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Forum topic by Patrickgeddes14 posted 02-20-2019 02:10 PM 322 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Patrickgeddes14

190 posts in 328 days


02-20-2019 02:10 PM

Any problem with not planing the bottom side of a slab? I think it looks cool


5 replies so far

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LittleShaver

586 posts in 1132 days


#1 posted 02-20-2019 02:15 PM

There is some risk that planing only one surface can relieve internal stress and cause wood movement. Give it a try and let it rest for a few days to see if you have a project or a problem.

It is common to find rough surfaces on the “hidden” sides of antiques. Seems to have worked 100+ years ago, should work today.

-- Sawdust Maker

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pottz

6389 posts in 1497 days


#2 posted 02-20-2019 03:02 PM

if you like it do it,i wouldn’t worry about it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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avsmusic1

529 posts in 1198 days


#3 posted 02-20-2019 03:37 PM

this prob goes without saying, but would you flatten certain sections for whatever support structure?

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SMP

1401 posts in 418 days


#4 posted 02-20-2019 03:42 PM



There is some risk that planing only one surface can relieve internal stress and cause wood movement. Give it a try and let it rest for a few days to see if you have a project or a problem.

It is common to find rough surfaces on the “hidden” sides of antiques. Seems to have worked 100+ years ago, should work today.

- LittleShaver

I actually have some questions on this that may help the OP. I know that when you plane a surface, the moisture content may need to equalize again, but should only take a few days. So in theory, if you do just one surface, just need to wait a few days, and re-check for twist, and bow etc. Now for finishing, as you mentioned this was common in the old days to have rough hidden parts. But they also used more breathable finishes, like BLO, etc. With today’s finishes, its usually recommended to finish both sides to prevent warping from uneven moisture gain/loss. Is that still recommended on rough?

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LittleShaver

586 posts in 1132 days


#5 posted 02-20-2019 10:52 PM

I would use the same finishing schedule on the rough surface to be on the safe side. I have, however, seen some old pieces with a high gloss face and a rough stained face. i can’t recall if it was a varnish or a shellac finish, but i do recall that the rough side appeared to have no topcoat.

-- Sawdust Maker

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