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Forum topic by Buzz89 posted 02-19-2019 02:15 PM 801 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Buzz89

4 posts in 27 days


02-19-2019 02:15 PM

So I only have 1 240v outlet available in my shop currently. My jointer uses that outlet. I’m upgrading to a 3hp saw that will also need that outlet. Is there any 2 way extension cord that plugs into the outlet and has 2 females that allow both my jointer and saw to be plugged in at the same time? That way I’m not constantly unplugging and plugging in. Obviously I’m not using them at the same time. Will one of those RV cords work? I suck at figuring out electrical. Thanks!


21 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

934 posts in 1790 days


#1 posted 02-19-2019 02:29 PM

yes,
but not cheap!
https://www.stayonline.com/power-cords/nema-6-20-power-cords-9231.asp
https://www.pduwhips.com/products/1233-6-20p-to-6-20r-y-splitter-power-cables.aspx

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8559 posts in 1434 days


#2 posted 02-19-2019 02:32 PM

You would have to make up an extension cord/splitter. I imagine that your saw is going to pull way more current than your jointer. Is the circuit sized appropriately for the saw? If it were me, if the circuit is the right size, I would run a second outlet rather than making a “splitter”. It’s a cleaner solution and would also be cheaper. If you find that the breaker isn’t big enough for the saw, you’re going to need a second 230 circuit or to change the existing circuit to a larger breaker AND WIRE SIZE. You CANNOT just swap the breaker out for a larger one and keep the wiring as-is.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Buzz89

4 posts in 27 days


#3 posted 02-19-2019 02:54 PM

My saw pulls the same as my 3hp jointer so that shouldnt be a problem.i would just add another breaker but my panel is completely maxed out and I don’t have room for another breaker without upgrading my entire panel.


You would have to make up an extension cord/splitter. I imagine that your saw is going to pull way more current than your jointer. Is the circuit sized appropriately for the saw? If it were me, if the circuit is the right size, I would run a second outlet rather than making a “splitter”. It s a cleaner solution and would also be cheaper. If you find that the breaker isn t big enough for the saw, you re going to need a second 230 circuit or to change the existing circuit to a larger breaker AND WIRE SIZE. You CANNOT just swap the breaker out for a larger one and keep the wiring as-is.

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Buzz89

4 posts in 27 days


#4 posted 02-19-2019 03:00 PM

So I have a 240v 20 amp outlet. My jointer pulls 15amp and my saw will pull 13amp. The cords you linked should support that right?


yes,
but not cheap!
https://www.stayonline.com/power-cords/nema-6-20-power-cords-9231.asp
https://www.pduwhips.com/products/1233-6-20p-to-6-20r-y-splitter-power-cables.aspx

- CaptainKlutz


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RobHannon

245 posts in 826 days


#5 posted 02-19-2019 03:25 PM

In data centers I have used breakout boxes that split and L6-30 into 4 L6-15 receptacles. Each receptacle had an individual breaker as part of the box. I think similar boxes are used for large scale lighting systems as well. They do exist but will not be at your typical home center nor will they be cheap. I agree with Kenny that you should add a second receptacle if the existing circuit is sufficient otherwise has a second circuit run from your panel. In most cases you can add a sub panel without needing to upgrade you entire panel, or tandem breakers can be an option to consolidate space. Any of those options I would talk over with an electrician unless it is something you are already very comfortable with.

Those PDU whips would work, but I try to reduce as many cords as possible in the shop. Each one is another thing that could get unplugged accidentally or tripped over. Electrically a quality split cable would be the same as a second receptacle off the same circuit. Note that it needs to be a quality one, 12awg minimum and 10 would be better.

View ToughCut's profile

ToughCut

64 posts in 1902 days


#6 posted 02-19-2019 03:31 PM

Try this it is how I solved my problem. You can only run one machine at a time though this is true for the splitter also,because the combined load will trip breaker.
https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-5822-I-Receptacle-Commercial-Grounding/dp/B000U39UY4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1550590234&sr=8-1&keywords=Leviton+5822

-- If you are not willing to learn, No one can help you. If you are determined to learn, No one can stop you.

View evilboweivel's profile

evilboweivel

3 posts in 28 days


#7 posted 02-19-2019 03:43 PM

based on what you posted I would go with the https://www.pduwhips.com/products/1233-6-20p-to-6-20r-y-splitter-power-cables.aspx

“I don’t have room for another breaker without upgrading my entire panel”
Look into replacing that breaker with a 60-100 amp breaker feeding a new wire over to a subpanel in your shop. At least a 12 circuit, prefer a 20 circuit panel. Now you have space for seperate circuits to feed your shop as you grow/upgrade. ALSO you now can turn the main breaker off and no machine will be able to turn on by little fingers when you aren’t there.

I currently share a 30 amp 240vac recp by plugging in which ever tool I need at the time. Table Saw, Shaper, Planer, Wide Belt Sander. When this 30 amp 240 vac recp was first installed only had the planer all the rest was 120vac on separate recp. Works OK for me right now, however really want/need to install a subpanel in the shop and refeed all equipment in the shop.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2985 posts in 2321 days


#8 posted 02-19-2019 08:44 PM

Maybe you can install a duplex receptacle. I have that for several machines, but I don’t know what amperage can be had in 240 duplex configuration. I do have to do some plug swapping, but it reduces the frequency, at least. Of course I never run 2 machines simultaneously. My DC is on its own circuit.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View JohnDon's profile (online now)

JohnDon

84 posts in 1465 days


#9 posted 02-20-2019 03:13 AM

Assuming that both tools wouldn’t reach a wall mounted duplex receptacle, make an “extension receptacle” by mounting a duplex receptacle in a metal handy box (with appropriate receptacle cover). Secure your extension cable to the box with a Romex-style knockout clamp, and you’re set (after making certain that your wiring is correct).

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

934 posts in 1790 days


#10 posted 02-20-2019 06:02 AM

Yes. 12 AWG wire can support up to 20 A load with no problems.
So as long as you only run ONE tool at time, it will give you want you want: 2 plugs on one circuit.

If you attempt to run both tools at same time, 20A breaker will do it’s job by tripping and protect the wiring.


So I have a 240v 20 amp outlet. My jointer pulls 15amp and my saw will pull 13amp. The cords you linked should support that right?

yes,
but not cheap!
https://www.stayonline.com/power-cords/nema-6-20-power-cords-9231.asp
https://www.pduwhips.com/products/1233-6-20p-to-6-20r-y-splitter-power-cables.aspx

- CaptainKlutz

- Buzz89


-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View bmerrill's profile

bmerrill

45 posts in 369 days


#11 posted 02-20-2019 01:43 PM

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

291 posts in 2030 days


#12 posted 02-20-2019 02:09 PM

I was in a similar predicament. I had a 220V table saw and shop heater and my only 220V circuit was 30A. I was pretty sure I couldn’t run both at the same time. So for a few years, I was unplugging one and plugging in the other as needed, but I started to worry about wear and tear on the components.

I found this switch and this enclosure on amazon (under $50) that lets me switch between them or I can cut power to both of them when I’m not going to be in the shop for a while (that way no can accidentally turn on the saw and hurt themselves).

Here is a photo of it installed in my shop. The heater outlet is to the left (#1 position on the switch) and the saw outlet is to the right (#2 position). The #0 position on the switch is both outlets are off.

I’m pretty happy with how well it works, especially for the price. But I would have loved to find something that would automatically turn the heater off when I pushed the “ON” button at the saw, then turned the heater back on when I turned the saw off. I think I could have figured it out, but it would have cost a lot more.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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jonah

2031 posts in 3594 days


#13 posted 02-20-2019 03:52 PM

I would use one of these, fed by 12AWG or 10AWG SOOW wire:

And put two receptacles in it.

View Smirak's profile

Smirak

88 posts in 814 days


#14 posted 02-20-2019 04:54 PM

somewhat on topic still…I was in the same predicament you are in about 6 weeks ago. I ordered a new table saw and a new dust collector. I was wondering about the ability to run two outlets off the same breaker. But, my predicament was that I would use both tools at the same time. I wound up running two new 30A breakers and two new drops. I know you said that you were maxed out, but perhaps a subpanel (as suggested above) is in your best interest. I don’t have any other 240 tools at the moment, but my next purchase is a J/P combo and I plan to use the same run as my table saw, but using the above pic, I will install a duplex or two outlets so I don’t have to unplug the saw every time, nor do I have to run a new drop.

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

3053 posts in 1683 days


#15 posted 02-20-2019 07:14 PM

May not be heavy enough for your machines but I have been using this for my 220v machines (one at a time) with no problems. It is rated up to 15 amps.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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