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220V Extension Cord?

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Forum topic by gauntlet21 posted 02-19-2019 02:00 AM 818 views 1 time favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gauntlet21

67 posts in 508 days


02-19-2019 02:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: electrical 220v 220v plug electrical outlet bandsaw power plug power plug

I’ve just received my first bandsaw and I decided to go with the Laguna 14 BX in the 220V 2.5 HP version/model. I’ve recently had a 100 Amp breaker box installed in my garage (where my workshop is) which included two 220V circuits. Now that the bandsaw has finally arrived, I thought about purchasing a 220V extension cord but realized that there are many different shapes of plugs for 220V (U.S./American) outlets/plugs. I’ve included a picture of the plug that is attached to the bandsaw and understand that the extension cord needs to be not only the same shape but of adequate gauge based on the length of the cord and specifications of the band saw.

I’m wondering if there is a simple cheat sheet that discusses this topic since it probably occurs to people who do not use 220V machines regularly. What is the “nomenclature” for my plug style so that if I were to walk into a “very high end, professional extension cord store” I could ask the very intelligent salesperson where I could find the exact extension cord that would allow me to plug in my bandsaw? I know that my washing machine (electric) uses a different shape/style plug so there has to be some kind of uniformity to all of this.

I appreciate any advice/knowledge/experience you’re willing to share with me as I am a lone wolf woodworker. My 220V outlets are wired to the box with two 20A circuits (each) if that has anything to do with this inquiry. The 220V outlets that are installed in my garage are capable of receiving the bandsaw’s plug as is so there isn’t any need for an adapter. My outlets look much like a 3 pronged grounded 110V outlet but have horizontal slots in the top two prongs to allow a plug like that found on the bandsaw.

Thanks in advance,

Dan


27 replies so far

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

292 posts in 77 days


#1 posted 02-19-2019 02:12 AM

I needed an extension for my bandsaw as I have it in the middle of the room. I just went down to the local big box and got some stranded three wire cable (10 gauge – two hots and a ground 12 gauge would hold 20 amps, but I go up one size when using stranded and I may use the cable for my welder from time to time) and a male end and a female end and made up what I needed. You can’t buy one, you have to make one and they have the ends in stock at Lowes and Home Depot.

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BlueRidgeDog

292 posts in 77 days


#2 posted 02-19-2019 02:21 AM

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jonah

2035 posts in 3596 days


#3 posted 02-19-2019 03:45 AM

Here’s a handy chart:

What you have there is a 6-15.

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firefighterontheside

19935 posts in 2154 days


#4 posted 02-19-2019 03:57 AM

I don’t think you’re gonna find an extension cord with those 6-15 ends. You can either buy appropriate wire and the ends the blue ridge dog linked to or buy an extension cord and cut the ends off and install new ones. I would buy one gauge heavier than the attached cord.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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runswithscissors

2987 posts in 2322 days


#5 posted 02-19-2019 04:27 AM

12 gauge wire is ample. My guess is your BS comes with a 14 gauge cord. Just buy a female plug to fit your tool’s cord, and whatever male plug you need to fit your receptacle. This is an easy job. I made up at least 2 extension cords for 220v in several applications.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Kazooman

1284 posts in 2250 days


#6 posted 02-19-2019 04:43 AM

You might want to consider an alternative solution to your wiring issue. For an extension cord you need some wire and male and female plugs. Why not purchase a longer piece of the appropriate wire and one new male plug and replace the cord on the saw. Easy to do and the best fix (in my opinion). That was the first thing I did when I got my SawStop table saw. I needed just a few feet more length and it was an easy fix.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2889 posts in 3735 days


#7 posted 02-19-2019 06:05 AM



12 gauge wire is ample. My guess is your BS comes with a 14 gauge cord. Just buy a female plug to fit your tool s cord, and whatever male plug you need to fit your receptacle. This is an easy job. I made up at least 2 extension cords for 220v in several applications.

- runswithscissors

What he said….. Shouldn’t be a problem.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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therealSteveN

2197 posts in 872 days


#8 posted 02-19-2019 06:58 AM

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CaptainKlutz

942 posts in 1792 days


#9 posted 02-19-2019 09:21 AM


12 gauge wire is ample. My guess is your BS comes with a 14 gauge cord. Just buy a female plug to fit your tool s cord, and whatever male plug you need to fit your receptacle. This is an easy job. I made up at least 2 extension cords for 220v in several applications.

- runswithscissors

What he said….. Shouldn t be a problem.

- Craftsman on the lake

+1 What they said.

If you insist on buying one, then can be found online:
https://www.amazon.com/NEMA-6-20-Extension-Power-Cord/dp/B00H54FZWW
https://www.homedepot.com/p/AC-WORKS-10-ft-20-Amp-250-Volt-SJTW-12-3-NEMA-6-20-Extension-Cord-with-Lighted-End-S620PR-010/305439334

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Fred Hargis

5372 posts in 2791 days


#10 posted 02-19-2019 11:36 AM

Plenty of good advice above, so I’ll just add: congrats on the new saw!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

292 posts in 77 days


#11 posted 02-19-2019 12:16 PM

As other have said, 12AWG is fine. I only go thicker so the cord can serve many functions.

View gmc's profile

gmc

62 posts in 2454 days


#12 posted 02-19-2019 12:55 PM

All good advice except for the 14awg gauge wire . 20amp 220vac requires 12 gage min per code. If you are handy and can put the ends on yourself it will cost you about half of what they want for one already made. You still need to be mindful of length and there are charts for that. I make mine from 10 Awg so I can use it for my small welder as well.

-- Gary, Central Illinois

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

406 posts in 2218 days


#13 posted 02-19-2019 12:59 PM

#14AWG up to 100’ would work, but a #12AWG is what I would buy.

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Nubsnstubs

1480 posts in 2027 days


#14 posted 02-19-2019 01:26 PM

I found that cord with the SJ designation for the type of rubber insulation on the outside is not a very good cord to be getting. The insulation breaks down after a few years, and your coud would have a bunch of cracks and possibly missing pieces of the black rubber.
That was usually what came with all my Rockwell and Delta tools I got in the late 70’s and early 80’s. Someone recommended switching to SO designation on the cords. Did that, and I have a couple that are over 30 years old now and still look new with the exception of scratches, paint and other stuff on them. I have a Porter Cable 3 hp router I bought about 2008. It gets very little used. The cord is always wrapped around it. There are about cracks, and where it goes into the strain relief, I can see the 3 wires where the black insulation is gone. When I see copper is when I’m gonna change the cord to SO type. ,.............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

236 posts in 3091 days


#15 posted 02-19-2019 01:39 PM

Don’t get into the saw wiring, the boxes are usually small and crowded. Just buy cord and plugs, definitely 12 awg, never buy 14 awg for large tools. I personally use 10 awg when I install a cord on a machine. And there is no need to use larger wire when using stranded, it is actually better than solid wire.

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