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Rounding out the Workshop - Question about Next Purchase

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Forum topic by kyngfish posted 02-18-2019 07:57 PM 1280 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kyngfish

35 posts in 392 days


02-18-2019 07:57 PM

So over the past year and a half I’ve been getting the big pieces together for a pretty solid workshop.

I bought a Festool Track Saw for long cuts, long angles and long bezels – Bosch job site table saw for repetitive cuts – Makita sliding miter for the other stuff. All of these work great, especially in my limited space. The Bosch with the gravity rise stand, and the same thing for the miter are really a godsend, they fold up and sit on one side of the garage, naturally I’d want a barn, with no space constraints, but this really meets my needs. For planing, jointing and smoothing I use hand tools.

I’ve been thinking about adding a bandsaw in – and honestly I’d love something with a table on it to be able to make long cuts at strange angles, but I really don’t have the space.

The other thing I realized is that a smaller bench top saw will have limitations when it comes to cutting odd shapes for larger pieces, like table tops, and etc. For now, I really don’t need something that will resaw any boards or cut down my own lumber.

So my question is, for the stuff I want to do, cut odd shapes, sharp bevels, etc, am I looking at the wrong tool? What should I be looking for? Is there a band saw solution with a big table that lets me angle things but can also be put away to save space?


20 replies so far

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2234 posts in 877 days


#1 posted 02-19-2019 04:22 PM

Everyone has different approaches to doing the same thing. I call it a lot of ways to skin a cat…

Much of what will drive your answer though is what are you making?

I do boxes, and casework for the most part, in both of those areas I “could” do all of the cuts on a TS, with nothing more than a jigsaw for curves. A BS would help on larger pieces. But my work wouldn’t get very far without a jointer, and a thickness planer, neither of which do you have a mention of.

What I am saying is this isn’t a list that someone could tell you a specific buying order, because all of us want help with different aspects. I’d suggest rather than thinking in terms of what do I need to buy next, think in terms of what am I going to make today. When you consistently are NOT able to get the result you hoped for, then look at what tool might be able to help you the most, and if I do get a BS, will it be mostly to cuts curves, or will it be to dimension stock (IE: resaw,) thinking like that will get you onto which BS do I want. And so forth.

-- Think safe, be safe

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kyngfish

35 posts in 392 days


#2 posted 02-19-2019 05:15 PM

Thanks for the response! So I’m building mostly home furniture, tables, credenzas, cabinets. I simply don’t have space for a thickness planer and a jointer, and since my projects tend to be multi-week affairs, I’ve done OK with hand planes for that type of work, so far, and then a random orbital sander for finishing. The downside is that I can’t use rough cut lumber to make my own boards, and I get stuff at pre-cut thickness, but that’s OK for now.

The work I can’t do right now, and I want to do, is cutting acute angles, (I used a jointer plane to cut a 12 degree bevel for a set of back-loaded horns I built, it was good enough, but not great), and I can’t cut curves, say in a tabletop for oddly shaped side tables or rounded corners. Another pain point is stronger joints for things like table legs (mortise and tenon).

Based on this, I was thinking bandsaw, and drill press, but maybe a good jig saw instead of the band saw, and a bench top drill press would do it? I’d love to have space for a legit cabinet saw and a router table and etc, but as my car needs to also be in the garage, I’m trying to get by with what I can – plus hand tools when I can.

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WoodenDreams

511 posts in 214 days


#3 posted 02-19-2019 06:27 PM

+1 on therealSteveN. A jig saw works well till you cut the wider thicknesses. Last night it was cutting 2” wide legs with my BS, to follow the contour of a barrel coffee table. it a breeze vs. a jig saw. Buy tools to what you plan on building. Have you gave much thought on a bench planer. Planning down a wider scrape board to match a project thickness. Order a catalog from Rocker, Grizzly, or another tool source, Browse thru for ideas you may like and check out the options that work for your space. Most of my equipment is benchtop models, this allows for wood storage under the benches.

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SMP

486 posts in 209 days


#4 posted 02-19-2019 07:34 PM

A jigsaw is very nice to have. But don’t forget how versatile a router can be, especially a plunge router once you figure out what jigs can do what particular job you need to do. You can cut curves in tabletops with a straight bit, for bevels you may find a bit that does what you want etc. I’ve even seen people flatten rough laminated tabletops with a router. And once you add a router table, its adds even more versatility.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5266 posts in 2654 days


#5 posted 02-19-2019 08:32 PM

I’d love to have space for a legit cabinet saw and a router table and etc, but as my car needs to also be in the garage

I wonder how long it will take you to conclude otherwise.

Any power tool can be put on wheels, so a band saw can be moved around as well. For making mortise and tenons I think you will find a drill press to be indispensable.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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kyngfish

35 posts in 392 days


#6 posted 02-19-2019 09:13 PM



I wonder how long it will take you to conclude otherwise

Lol. If you mean get rid of the car or let it live outside – that’s a categorical -never. As much as I love hobby woodworking, that 1986 Carrera has been a dream of mine since a poster I had as a kid.

View kyngfish's profile

kyngfish

35 posts in 392 days


#7 posted 02-19-2019 09:28 PM



A jigsaw is very nice to have. But don t forget how versatile a router can be, especially a plunge router once you figure out what jigs can do what particular job you need to do. You can cut curves in tabletops with a straight bit, for bevels you may find a bit that does what you want etc. I ve even seen people flatten rough laminated tabletops with a router. And once you add a router table, its adds even more versatility.

- SMP

Have a plunger router especially for that reason. Have a really hard time going freehand or keeping it in a straight line. Touché on the curve though. I have a circle cutting jig. I guess if I needed an ellipsis I could do three partial circles? I’d be interested in any reading for jigs for plunge routers

View MSquared's profile

MSquared

270 posts in 217 days


#8 posted 02-20-2019 04:10 AM

Dude! You have an ‘86 Carrera?! Screw the garage, park it in the living room!! Use the workshop to build ramps if needed!

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

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kyngfish

35 posts in 392 days


#9 posted 02-20-2019 01:34 PM



Dude! You have an 86 Carrera?! Screw the garage, park it in the living room!! Use the workshop to build ramps if needed!

- MSquared

Lol. Not sure if you’re familiar with the term “Florida House”. My garage is probably bigger than my living room and dining room combined.

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jonah

2039 posts in 3602 days


#10 posted 02-20-2019 03:38 PM

The correct answer to this question (which comes up all the time) is “whatever tool you need to do the next project.”

Buying tools without a defined use for them is a waste of money and time.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1336 posts in 3153 days


#11 posted 02-20-2019 03:40 PM

In this picture is a 2 car garage with a 12’ ceiling, aside from the visible 2 cars and the dust collector, there is/are…

Contractors Table Saw with 12” to the left of blade and 40” to the right with a router wing installed
14” Band saw
6” Jointer
13” planer
Drill press floor mount
12” miter saw on stand with dust enclosure
20 gallon 2 stage air compressor
sanding station table with oscillating spindle sander, and 4×26 belt & 6” disc combo
2 30”x 5’ workbenches
5’ tall x 42” wide tool chest
Veritable boatload of hand tools human and electric powered
And of course almost every available inch of wall and ceiling space stores something else.

What I hate about it is that to go out and play with my tools it takes about an hour or so to set it all up. If your Florida House is that large and you’re motivated to make it work than you can do it. Jonah makes a good point however that you should let your work drive the purchase, unless it’s a tool that you know you’ll eventually be buying and you fall into a silly deal. There are often stories here where an LJ will go to look a tool and discover someone that is clearing their shop…. a quality tool in good well cared for shape that is 50% + off of new pricing is hard to walk past.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ChefHDAN

1336 posts in 3153 days


#12 posted 02-20-2019 03:53 PM

deleted double post

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View kyngfish's profile

kyngfish

35 posts in 392 days


#13 posted 02-20-2019 03:55 PM



If your Florida House is that large and you re motivated to make it work than you can do it…

Other way around. Florida houses are expensive and small – we also don’t have basement. But, point taken. Unfortunately my wife also needs the garage so I have to play nice.

RE: work driving tools – that was my original question. If what I want to do is cut curves and long bevels, is the bandsaw the way to go? If it’s a plunge router, I already have one, but how do I keep things straight? I’m terrible free handing that thing.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1336 posts in 3153 days


#14 posted 02-20-2019 04:03 PM

Looks like you should head out to Boyton Beach, lots to look at, and you can generally get $20 or so knocked off the prices
https://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/tls/d/boynton-beach-drill-press/6823412505.html

https://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/tls/d/boynton-beach-band-saw/6823411674.html

https://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/tls/d/boynton-beach-woodshop-dust-collector/6823343426.html

https://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/tls/d/lake-worth-delta-table-saw/6823210205.html

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View SMP's profile

SMP

486 posts in 209 days


#15 posted 02-20-2019 04:03 PM


If your Florida House is that large and you re motivated to make it work than you can do it…

Other way around. Florida houses are expensive and small – we also don t have basement. But, point taken. Unfortunately my wife also needs the garage so I have to play nice.

RE: work driving tools – that was my original question. If what I want to do is cut curves and long bevels, is the bandsaw the way to go? If it s a plunge router, I already have one, but how do I keep things straight? I m terrible free handing that thing.

- kyngfish

I’m pretty good freehand at stuff. But I will still use router bits with bearings, or build a jig and use bushings. You can find really good books on Router Jigs and it will open your mind to all the crazy stuff that you can do with a router that you never thought of. Well actually I have mostly been using my router table more than handheld routing. I am actually currently in the process of cutting my router table top to put on my table saw top as the right side.

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