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Dedicated cross cut blade for TS

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Forum topic by Mainiac Matt posted 02-18-2019 04:38 PM 686 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


02-18-2019 04:38 PM

My WW game is finally up to the point that I need more reliably accurate cross cuts than I can get on my old Milwaukee SCMS. And I’ve dialed in both miter gauges and sleds to hit dead “dead nuts” each and every time.

For some time I’ve been getting great results from a the Freud Fusion 40 tooth Hi-ATB blade, but my current Morris chair build, from extremely dense and thick White Oak, has highlighted the limitations of that blade.

So I got a 24 tooth full kerf FTG grind Frued Industrial blade (LM72010) for rips and jointery… which has proven to be a big improvement…. especially for the joinery cuts (marked improvement over both the Fusion and a 24 tooth thin kerf Diablo, which is ATB grind).

Now, after burning a couple cross cuts in 2.5” thick stock with the Fusion and getting tired of swapping the 60 tooth thin kerf Diablo from my SCMS, I’ve decided that I want a dedicated TS cross cut blade for precision cutting in challenging stock, to achieve my best buillds.

My budget and estimation of the point of diminishing returns will prohibit getting a WWII or a Ridge Carbide blade, so in an effort to keep the $ below $75, I’m looking at these two blades.

Amana 610600

and

Freud LU73R010

I was surprised the Freud is $16 more than the Amana.

The Freud has the Teflon coating …. but I’m not sure that makes as much difference in a full kerf blade where there’s more air space between the plate and the cut wall.

The Amana has the Copper plugs for vibration reduction, which (opposed to the laser cut ‘S’ patterns) seem to be the norm on higher end blades.

I’d really appreciate it if anyone (where R U KnotScott?) who has experience with either of these blades could chime in.

I’m open to other considerations, but they have to be ATB grind and full kerf, and competitively priced.

Thanks in advance for any helpful advice.

(Please don’t turn this into a brand war or thin vs. full kerf debate)

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam


18 replies so far

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HokieKen

8631 posts in 1436 days


#1 posted 02-18-2019 04:59 PM

I don’t have any experience with either of those blades but, when looking at the Freud, I did notice they have another version that lacks the coating for considerably less. The top bevel grind is different too – 15 deg on the silver one and 20 deg on the red one. Those seem to be the only differences. Just thought I’d throw it out there for you.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


#2 posted 02-18-2019 05:01 PM

Thanks for link… that blade actually does have their “silver ice” coating

I just realized that the LU73R010 is a Hi-ATB blade.

I know that’s good for panel stock like Melamine, but since I already have the Fusion, I’m not sure I want a second Hi-ATB blade, as they are more prone to chipping a tooth tip.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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JayT

6106 posts in 2509 days


#3 posted 02-18-2019 05:15 PM

Matt, you might also take a look at the Everlast LSP1060A (make sure it’s an A model, the LSP1060T is a triple chip grind) I’m using this one on my miter saw and the performance upgrade over the previous Freud Diablo is noteworthy—and the Everlast is designed more for table saw use than miter saws.

Everlast has mainly been sold through distributors to commercial businesses and just in the last year or so have started pushing more into the contractor, prosumer and hobbyist market for those people who just haven’t been happy with the readily available offerings at the big box stores. Of course, it helps that they are practically right down the road from me (less than an hour away) and I’ve had the chance to meet and talk with the owner/CEO several times. He is passionate about saw blades and making sure that Everlast’s offerings are the best he can make them.

-- In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


#4 posted 02-18-2019 06:37 PM

Thanks for the link to Everlast Jay… looks very interesting.

Although I have always asummed 60 tooth blades were the way to go for solid wood and 80 tooth blades were intened for veneered ply and melamine, I’m open to anyone’s feedback on using 80 tooth blades.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


#5 posted 02-18-2019 06:47 PM

And now I’m seeing that I can get the Amana 610600c

Which is the same thing, but with the blue coating.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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HokieKen

8631 posts in 1436 days


#6 posted 02-18-2019 06:59 PM

I think with blade diameters being equal, 60T vs 80T is a matter of stock thickness. More teeth should, in theory, give a cleaner cut but with thicker stock, that also means more teeth in the cut at a given time which means more swarf trapped in the cut at the same time. So, for the cleanest cut for thinner stock, 80T is probably the better choice. For thicker stock, 60T probably is.

All that being said, I can’t see needing any better cut than I can get with the 60T thin kerf blade I use. And FWIW, I don’t think the thin kerf improves cut quality, I just have a 1.25 hp saw so I bought it to aid with that.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


#7 posted 02-18-2019 07:18 PM

Thanks Ken…. that’s the blade I use on my SCMS and I agree that leaves a very good finish. Even on the thick stuff.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11317 posts in 3726 days


#8 posted 02-18-2019 09:17 PM

I’m sold on Tenryu blades. In my 35 years of making sawdust and kindling, I have yet to find a blade of equal quality and longevity. Take a look, Matt.
TENRYUhttp://www.tenryu.com/is.html

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Andre's profile

Andre

2499 posts in 2103 days


#9 posted 02-18-2019 09:30 PM

Picked up this one last year at a show, has impressed me so far!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


#10 posted 02-18-2019 09:36 PM

Thanks Gene… that’s definitely a contender. I hadn’t considered them, as I thought they cost much more. But the 60 tooth model is $63, which is in my price range.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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knotscott

8241 posts in 3673 days


#11 posted 02-18-2019 09:52 PM

I’m familiar with both of those blades, but unfortunately don’t recall actually using either. Both are good brands and sound designs. For low tearout, I’m a fan of the Hi-ATB, but you’re already aware there are always tradeoffs ….shorter edge life in this case.

HokieKen touched on the 80T option. Cost and chance of burning increases, but you’ll get cleanest cut. If your volumes and thickness are high frequently, and you’re looking for best edge life, a 60T ATB or even a TCG would be a good choice. If high volumes and thicker stock aren’t common in your shop, I’d go with a 60T to 80T Hi-ATB for cleanest cut…really depends on your objectives.

I think CMT Industrial makes a cabinet makers blade similar to what you posted. Tenryu, Everlast, Infinity are also very reputable brands.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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CaptainKlutz

942 posts in 1792 days


#12 posted 02-18-2019 10:37 PM

#1 – Many things can cause burning. Misalignment, Dull blade, Dirty blade can all cause burning. Number one mistake: Make sure your blade is clean. IMHO – When a clean fusion blade burns wood on perfectly aligned saw; you are either moving too slow, or it may need sharpening.

#2 – Color me not a fan of red blades. IMHO Freud red teflon coating is not worth spending extra to get. It gums with with pitch/resin 5X faster than no coating, or silver version blades. AND just like the picture above, after you cut through 100 ft of lumber, the coating rubs off, collects more resin then if it were naked, which then becomes a useless waste of money. I have to clean my ‘red’ blades much more often than silver ones.

#3 – You mentioned using SCMS blade on TS?
SCMS cuts better with different tooth geometry than TS. If look carefully, most miter saw blades have negative 10-15 degree hook angle, and TS cross cut has positive hook angle. The negative hook angle helps reduce climbing during saw stroke. About the only place I would use negative hook angle on TS would be for cutting melamine laminate to reduce chipping, even then it would be 0 to -3 degrees, not the -7 to -15 degrees used on miter saw. So if the LU88R010 blade you have works, use it on TS where it belonds, and buy proper negative hook angle blade for your SCMS.

+1 Use 60T cross cut on thick stock, 80T on thin stock.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

8844 posts in 2626 days


#13 posted 02-19-2019 03:32 AM

Thanks for all the feedback. It has helped me think through the decision.

I think Stumpy Nubs reviews of the Amana blades is going to swing my vote and I’ll try their 610600C blade.

I definitely want full kerf, 60 tooth seems smart for thicker materials and do like the Hi-ATB on my Fusion, I already have one chipped tooth on it.

And then of course there’s the pretty color :^D

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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firefighterontheside

19935 posts in 2154 days


#14 posted 02-19-2019 03:49 AM

HokieKen, I bought the “non-red” blade that you linked to from the exact same seller. When it comes it IS red and has the exact same model number. I haven’t used it yet though.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2889 posts in 3735 days


#15 posted 02-19-2019 06:09 AM

I use both combination and rip blades in the Freud Ice variety. Love them for a couple of reasons. One is that they cut well and don’t dull fast. The second is that the teeth are beefy. I can have them sharpened a few times and there is still plenty of tooth left.
Another point is that they are not as pricey as some other blades. I don’t now if they are as good as some of the expensive ones but for me they seem to be good for the price. I cut a lot of oak, maple, cherry.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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