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How to cut this on the job site?

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Forum topic by laterthanuthink posted 02-17-2019 07:30 PM 648 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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laterthanuthink

32 posts in 433 days


02-17-2019 07:30 PM

Greetings sawdust makers. If I could, I would cut these in my shop on my table saw with a sled. I would cut to size on each side, eventually going all the way through, using a stop to keep all the cuts lined up. However, I need to cut these on the job site with only a standard skilsaw. Any ideas? I don’t want to butcher the cut end.

https://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/fencing/wood-fencing/6-x-6-2-critical-structural-ac2-reg-green-pressure-treated-pine-timber/1112816/p-1444422021391.htm


13 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1700 posts in 466 days


#1 posted 02-17-2019 07:43 PM

how many do you have to cut ??
if you have several, line them all up and clamp tightly together.
use a piece of 1/2” plywood for the guide and screw that to the posts.
unclamp, reposition, reclamp, cut again – 4 times. (measure twice = cut once).
and the ends of those mass produced timbers are not always square !!!!
so use a good carpenters square along the sides to ensure a square cut.

for just one or two, make a 8 inch collar with three sides perfectly square that will
fit snugly over the post – and screw it into place with a few drywall screws. that will be
the guide for your skilsaw foot plate. after three cuts, remove the collar and either
finish the cut with a hand saw or reposition the collar for the final cut.

what are you making ??

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

303 posts in 424 days


#2 posted 02-17-2019 08:35 PM

I was going to suggest a collar as well. Use a square to ensure you attach the collar square on 3 sides and you should be fine.

Though I like John’s idea of clamping the whole set together and using 1/2” plywood as a guide if you need to cut a bunch.

PS. I’ve used a chain saw in the past. Mark your line with some chalk and just make certain you are lined up well do you can get it in one cut.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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Rich

4157 posts in 892 days


#3 posted 02-17-2019 08:41 PM

Those are 5 1/2” square. Depth of cut on my Skil Mag 77 worm drive is 2 1/4”, so better bring along a Saws All or something else to cut through the plug. Or use this as a perfect excuse to buy a 10” circular saw.

Even better, get one of these and do it in one pass (6 1/4” depth of cut).

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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laterthanuthink

32 posts in 433 days


#4 posted 02-17-2019 09:32 PM

I have 6, holding my deck up. End grain at the top of the existing timbers is punky. Each one is a different length. Great idea, collar would work just fine. I like the big saw, maybe I can rent it?

I wonder if there is a copper flashing I can use on the end grain tops so they last longer than 20 years this time?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1700 posts in 466 days


#5 posted 02-17-2019 09:39 PM

you can cut six timbers with a hand saw or sawzall quicker than you can
go the rental store (twice) and much cheaper. (or even a chainsaw if you have one).
don’t overthink it – - – are the top ends going to be seen ????

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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BFamous

303 posts in 424 days


#6 posted 02-17-2019 09:48 PM

You could do copper flashing if you want – it’s just a sheet of copper. Though I’d probably out for a sticky rubber like they use around windows and then dress it up with something trim work.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

5722 posts in 1015 days


#7 posted 02-17-2019 10:15 PM

20 second cut with THESE :<))))))))))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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dhazelton

2837 posts in 2600 days


#8 posted 02-17-2019 10:33 PM

I use a metal speed square. Make one cut, rotate the post a quarter turn and insert the saw blade and reset the square, so on and so on.

View laterthanuthink's profile

laterthanuthink

32 posts in 433 days


#9 posted 02-17-2019 10:37 PM

Oh man those 12 inch reciprocating pruning blades look like just the ticket for my cabin in the woods rotten deck project. And since every plan needs a plan B I will have a good handsaw waiting in the back of the truck. Thanks guys!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2234 posts in 877 days


#10 posted 02-17-2019 10:52 PM



I have 6, holding my deck up. End grain at the top of the existing timbers is punky. Each one is a different length. Great idea, collar would work just fine. I like the big saw, maybe I can rent it?

I wonder if there is a copper flashing I can use on the end grain tops so they last longer than 20 years this time?

- laterthanuthink

For cutting at the site I would use a miter chop saw, 10” saws have a 90* cross of around 5 1/2” 12” saws usually are closer to 7 1/2” What you need is a flat level spot for it, and good support to set your timbers on so as to have a straight line off the saw, going on to the saw and it needs to be able to rest flat at the blade, and fit squarely to the deck, and the fence of the saw. All of the support is important for good cuts, and safety. If the 10” saw is used, and the cut is shy of what you need, most will flip the stock, and cut from the other side to get through. Obviously care needs to be used for alignment for both results, and safety. Know if you don’t own one, you can rent one. I’m betting you either have one, or know someone who does.

That is just cutting the wood, but I think you may have more to think about. Are the current timbers in contact with the ground? Or are they in the ground?

If you have rot on the ends up where the timbers are out of the ground, and there is ground contact of any kind, I’d be shocked to learn the bottoms were all Ok….

Forrest Products long ago sold America on a dream of 40 years in ground with “Treated Lumber” There are many many articles online about horrors people have gone through believing this. Here is an article that covers a lot of ground.
Item 3 starts with the treated wood myth.

Just know deck builders today install concrete piers for anything in ground, and don’t start using any “decking product” until it’s no longer touching the ground. If you look at most of the decks being made they are an engineered wood, or plastic product. Treated wood is still used but no where near where it was, and a lot of builders will not touch the products offered as “treated lumber” because of all the variability in them.

I quit doing tradework over 10 years ago, and I had switched entirely to plastics/engineered wood for the last dozen years before that. Trex was out in 98, and it was an overnight sensation after years of builders woes due to treated wood. Before that there were a few off brands still much better than wood, but compared to today, just junk. Plastics were also learning, and now are a good alternative. All I am sure of is we knew treated wood was not our future, much too inconsistent, way too many problems after as few as 3 years.

Not trying to sell you anything here, just saying look at the internet carefully about going back to treated lumber. I think you will find it a passive sale at the Big Boxes, it’s laying there. The seeds that it’s what decks are made of, are already sown, so like we are trained, we buy… I imagine if you asked the sales people at the lumber desk, “what is the best product to use for an outdoor deck,” they will direct your eyes to something else.

-- Think safe, be safe

View pontic's profile

pontic

674 posts in 912 days


#11 posted 02-17-2019 11:14 PM

Sawsall with the “Beam blade or 7.1/2” circular with the cut rotate toward you and cut and then repeat till it’s all cut then take a hand saw nd cut the middle or just wack it with a himmer if you are not looking for furnature grade cuts.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

407 posts in 2224 days


#12 posted 02-18-2019 12:35 PM

Anything you have that cuts wood, me a chainsaw.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7449 posts in 3671 days


#13 posted 02-18-2019 06:32 PM

Remember, the sawdust that you make cutting these is hazardous to health!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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