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Forum topic by Klausmadsen posted 02-17-2019 03:48 PM 687 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Klausmadsen

9 posts in 37 days


02-17-2019 03:48 PM

Hi all I am new here and this is my first post.

I just a 14” Bandsaw for diverse woodwork including Bandsaw boxes :)

I have been reading and seen some of the charts about the radius the different size blades should be able to cut.

I have a 6mm (1/4”) blade which should be able to cut a radius on around 16mm (5/8”).

I made some test cut and I can get it to cut that radius at all not even close! Maybe double that radius.

So are those charts correct or do I do something wrong here?

Thanks for any help.

Klaus


17 replies so far

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John Smith

1700 posts in 466 days


#1 posted 02-17-2019 06:11 PM

there are many variables in cutting circles and curves with a bandsaw.
type of wood, thickness of wood, sharpness of blade, properly tuned blade,
proper tension, and the list goes on and on.
just practice with the wood and thickness that you use the most while you are adjusting
the saw to correct or enhance anything that is needed for the most favorable results.
I really never paid any attention to guides or charts.

if this is your first bandsaw, and you are totally new to bandsaw work and its operation in general,
you need to read and research how to accurately adjust everything on the saw that you have.
is your saw new or used ? if the rubber tires look old, cracked and worn, it is time to replace them.
if it is totally out of whack, you will struggle with every project you cut on it.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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MrUnix

7250 posts in 2502 days


#2 posted 02-17-2019 06:18 PM

Make sure your blade guides and blade tension are set properly. If you haven’t already, here is the obligatory bandsaw tune up video – watch it, do it, make sawdust:

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Jim Finn

2691 posts in 3225 days


#3 posted 02-17-2019 09:59 PM

A quality sharp blade is necessary. Also, wIth the saw running apply a stone to the backside of the blade to round it over a bit. This helps in making sharp turns.

-- No PHD just a DD214

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bondogaposis

5266 posts in 2654 days


#4 posted 02-17-2019 11:15 PM

I’d say that a 5/8” radius is extremely optimistic for a 1/4” blade. Stoning the back of your blades does help. Your best guide will be experience. If you can’t cut the radius you want, get a smaller blade. You can get blades down to 1/8”, after that you need a scroll saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Klausmadsen

9 posts in 37 days


#5 posted 02-17-2019 11:31 PM

Great thanks all for your answer.

Yes, it is a brand new machine but before I bought it I was reading all that I could find here on the net and seen many videos on how to set it up properly, so that part should be ok.
The machine is cutting straight with no sliding (sorry can’t remember the correct word – English is not my first language) I guess you know what I mean.

I think that as Bondo Gaposis are writing, that it is extremely optimistic to think that a 1/4” blade should be able to cut a 5/8” radius. But I have seen it done in some of the videos on Youtube.
I will try, as some of you have suggested grinding the back edges of the blade with a stone.

Thanks all for your help, much appreciated.
Klaus

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Rich

4157 posts in 892 days


#6 posted 02-18-2019 12:57 AM

A Carter Stabilizer will replace your stock guides and is designed for extremely tight curves. Below is a link to Alex Snodgrass doing the classic reindeer cut from a block of wood. You can see the small radius he can get from what appears to be a 1/4” blade. Definitely 5/8” or smaller.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7gmzra_5_c

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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poospleasures

827 posts in 2787 days


#7 posted 02-18-2019 01:01 AM

I know this is not what you want to hear but what I finally did. Found an old Craftsman 12” band saw and put a Carter single bearing guide roller on it. With a 3/16” blade can cut almost any radius. Paid 60.00 for saw and like 89.00 for the roller guide. Pm if you have questions.

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

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Klausmadsen

9 posts in 37 days


#8 posted 02-18-2019 09:48 PM



A Carter Stabilizer will replace your stock guides and is designed for extremely tight curves. Below is a link to Alex Snodgrass doing the classic reindeer cut from a block of wood. You can see the small radius he can get from what appears to be a 1/4” blade. Definitely 5/8” or smaller.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7gmzra_5_c

- Rich

Wow thanks for that link.

I just watch the video and wow that is amazing and he is doing it with a 1/4” blade!

I have to find out if they fit on my new machine.
And yes I can see on their website that they have so many different models so I should be able to find one.

Thanks again, much appreciated.

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Klausmadsen

9 posts in 37 days


#9 posted 02-18-2019 09:53 PM



I know this is not what you want to hear but what I finally did. Found an old Craftsman 12” band saw and put a Carter single bearing guide roller on it. With a 3/16” blade can cut almost any radius. Paid 60.00 for saw and like 89.00 for the roller guide. Pm if you have questions.

- poospleasures

Yes it is what I want to hear, that you have one of those stabilizers and you are happy with it :)

So that must be the way to go.

When I watch the video it looks like it is only touching the blade on the back is that correct?
If yes, can’t I just take the front roller bearing off?

Cheers

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Rich

4157 posts in 892 days


#10 posted 02-18-2019 11:10 PM


When I watch the video it looks like it is only touching the blade on the back is that correct?
If yes, can t I just take the front roller bearing off?

- Klausmadsen

No, if you look closely, there is a groove in the bearing that keeps the blade from slipping side-to-side.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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poospleasures

827 posts in 2787 days


#11 posted 02-19-2019 12:33 AM

The only reason for the old used (I redid it) band saw was to not have to readjust my 14” saw. Good luck.

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

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Klausmadsen

9 posts in 37 days


#12 posted 02-19-2019 01:02 AM



The only reason for the old used (I redid it) band saw was to not have to readjust my 14” saw. Good luck.

- poospleasures

Ahhh ok so you have two band saws, one for cutting curves and one for resawing?

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poospleasures

827 posts in 2787 days


#13 posted 02-19-2019 02:07 AM

sorry I should have told you I ordered the roller for the Shop Fox 14” then filed down just a little to fit the old 12”. PM if I can help more

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

326 posts in 482 days


#14 posted 02-19-2019 02:46 AM



A Carter Stabilizer will replace your stock guides and is designed for extremely tight curves. Below is a link to Alex Snodgrass doing the classic reindeer cut from a block of wood. You can see the small radius he can get from what appears to be a 1/4” blade. Definitely 5/8” or smaller.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7gmzra_5_c

- Rich

OP, Take Rich’s advice. I use roughly $1000/ worth of 3/16” blades per year. Mainly on material 1.5-3.25”. Have no problem cutting .25” or less. Carter makes an excellent product. My saw aint nuttin fancy either. 20 year old Grizzly.

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Klausmadsen

9 posts in 37 days


#15 posted 02-19-2019 03:02 AM


OP, Take Rich s advice. I use roughly $1000/ worth of 3/16” blades per year. Mainly on material 1.5-3.25”. Have no problem cutting .25” or less. Carter makes an excellent product. My saw aint nuttin fancy either. 20 year old Grizzly.

- CWWoodworking

Yes, I will thanks, I just have to find out if they make one which fits my machine.

Thanks

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