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How would you create these slats to hold jewelry?

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Forum topic by LearningAsIGo posted 02-15-2019 07:33 PM 462 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LearningAsIGo

53 posts in 2934 days


02-15-2019 07:33 PM

Do you start out with a board of regular thickness and rip smaller thicknesses with a bandsaw after you drill the holes and make the little slots?

I assume a bandsaw would be the best tool to cut out the slots? Unfortunately I don’t have one. Any other ways to do this?


13 replies so far

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JCamp

933 posts in 848 days


#1 posted 02-15-2019 07:37 PM

I’d say u could buy a board around that size. Mayb 3inchs by 1/4 inch thick. Or if u wanted it to be a bit more decorated u could use a piece of trim (like wall or baseboard)
As for the slots you could buy a very thin tablesaw blade but I’d try a jig saw first

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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HokieKen

8630 posts in 1436 days


#2 posted 02-15-2019 07:37 PM

How wide are the slots? My first thought would be to stand the board upright clamped to a miter gauge and cut the kerfs with the table saw.

I’m not sure exactly what you’re asking about ripping smaller thicknesses after drilling and cutting the slots. Not sure why you couldn’t start with a board cut to size.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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them700project

153 posts in 1316 days


#3 posted 02-15-2019 07:42 PM

I would basically make a box joint jig and run it across the tablesaw with a flat bottom blade

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bondogaposis

5255 posts in 2649 days


#4 posted 02-15-2019 07:51 PM

Hand saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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LearningAsIGo

53 posts in 2934 days


#5 posted 02-15-2019 07:53 PM



How wide are the slots? My first thought would be to stand the board upright clamped to a miter gauge and cut the kerfs with the table saw.

I m not sure exactly what you re asking about ripping smaller thicknesses after drilling and cutting the slots. Not sure why you couldn t start with a board cut to size.

- HokieKen

I assume the slots could be 1/8” wide or less. I was thinking if I used a thin board it might split when trying to cut the slots. So if you used a thicker board that might not happen.

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HokieKen

8630 posts in 1436 days


#6 posted 02-15-2019 07:58 PM

I’d use the thin board and just put a sacrificial backer behind it. I’m not a fan of resawing on a table saw, it never leaves a good finish and isn’t very safe.

Bondo’s suggestion of using a handsaw is a good one as well.

Edit: If you have a 1/8” router bit that’s a good option too.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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therealSteveN

2197 posts in 872 days


#7 posted 02-15-2019 08:05 PM

If those are earrings hanging from those cuts it was done almost positively with a thin kerf TS blade, and as already suggested either a sled or jig to back the work up, and some kind of leapfrog, like a box joint jig has to make the spacing. IOW really simple to do.

If building jigs isn’t your thing, then Rockler could make it for you for the lowly sum of 35 bux Hangs on your miter gauge, and for this a thin or regular kerf saw blade would work.

-- Think safe, be safe

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ed13

32 posts in 848 days


#8 posted 02-16-2019 02:56 AM

Plan B: Use window screen in the design in some way. The earrings hang by putting them through the holes in the screening. My daughter just made something in this way and likes it a lot.

Otherwise, my first inclination is bang ‘em out with a tenon saw. I just tried and tested with my daughters earring, and while it worked, the kerf is a bit on the narrow side. This saw has a fine set because I use it for joinery, so I tried a panel saw and it was perfect. Try to orient the wood so that it is a rip cut to avoid a jagged edge. If that doesn’t work with your design, experiment with knifing the line or making a sandwich with sacrificial material. Oh..now I understand your question about rip smaller thickness…yeah, if you must do these as crosscuts, you could cut the slots, let it be ragged on the back side, and then either resaw or take a few swipes with a plane to clean up.

I think machines will give too wide a kerf. I could do those 20 slots by hand in a few minutes, not counting layout. Add a few more minutes to zip a plane over it to clean up.

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SMP

456 posts in 203 days


#9 posted 02-16-2019 03:29 AM

I guess it kind of depends on what tools you have. I would just use a handsaw personally. Unless making more than 3 or so.

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TheFridge

10844 posts in 1783 days


#10 posted 02-16-2019 03:44 AM

7-1/4 blade with a sled

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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HokieKen

8630 posts in 1436 days


#11 posted 02-16-2019 03:51 AM



7-1/4 blade with a sled

- TheFridge

Good call. Gives 1/16 kerf

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Sylvain

804 posts in 2797 days


#12 posted 02-16-2019 01:44 PM

Plywood to avoid splitting?

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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cowboyup3371

70 posts in 495 days


#13 posted 02-16-2019 04:14 PM

I made something very similar last year using my bandsaw but I would agree with the use of a hand or back saw. I first routed out the back side of this stick of walnut to a thickness I wanted leaving a bit at each end to allow for it to be mortised in to the case sides.

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

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