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Bath Caddy? What wood/finish you recommend.

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Forum topic by Kilo19 posted 02-13-2019 03:34 PM 434 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kilo19

104 posts in 705 days


02-13-2019 03:34 PM

So going along with remodeling our masterbathroom, I’ll be putting in a clawfoot tub. My wife has hinted to me about making a bathcaddy. I’ve looked up several ideas, and have a few of my own, (place for a glass of , phone, food/snacks etc…).

My dad at one time had teak left over from a job, but it ended up being used elsewhere. Was thinking teak would be a good material?? (correct me if I’m wrong) I’m not dead set on any particular type of wood, just a wood that can withstand high humidity and not fall apart. I plan on using oldschool joinery instead of fasteners, if possible.

But also what type of protectant would you recommend?
several coats of poly? water or oil? prefer oil, but if water is better then so be it
stain and sealer? like for outdoor porches?

Let me know your thoughts. Thanks in advance.

Also this won’t have to be ready till probably the end of march early april, as that is my personal goal to have the bathroom done.

-- Justin


11 replies so far

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John Smith

1971 posts in 642 days


#1 posted 02-13-2019 03:47 PM

mahogany is a used on boats all over the world and hold up well
with proper maintenance.
that may be an option for you to consider.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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Kilo19

104 posts in 705 days


#2 posted 02-13-2019 03:50 PM



mahogany is a used on boats all over the world and hold up well
with proper maintenance.
that may be an option for you to consider.
- John Smith

Would’ve never thought of that kind, hmm, I should’ve added this bit also. Budget, lol

Not looking for the cheapest option, but not the most expensive. What would be a good higher middle ground choice?
Like at discount tires website, haha,

good, better, BEST!!!

-- Justin

View DS's profile

DS

3265 posts in 2899 days


#3 posted 02-13-2019 04:00 PM

Teak – on the best boats… IMHO

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#4 posted 02-13-2019 04:29 PM

I’ve never tried it for a wet location but the old warship Old Iron Side was made from Live Oak. Any time my live oak tree is pruned, I save the logs for projects. I’ve been thinking about making a shower caddy so maybe I will give that a try. Teak is used for lots of spa related stuff. Bald Cypress might be another option. Just make sure that you don’t use an non-stainless hardware as high tannin woods will blacken where there is contact and moisture. Oil finishes are probably best. You can always refresh them as needed. Anything that seals with a film, like poly, will eventually develop some small cracks, especially around joints, and any moisture that seep in won’t be able to leave and you may get mildew underneath the finish.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Kilo19

104 posts in 705 days


#5 posted 02-13-2019 05:18 PM



I ve never tried it for a wet location but the old warship Old Iron Side was made from Live Oak. Any time my live oak tree is pruned, I save the logs for projects. I ve been thinking about making a shower caddy so maybe I will give that a try. Teak is used for lots of spa related stuff. Bald Cypress might be another option. Just make sure that you don t use an non-stainless hardware as high tannin woods will blacken where there is contact and moisture. Oil finishes are probably best. You can always refresh them as needed. Anything that seals with a film, like poly, will eventually develop some small cracks, especially around joints, and any moisture that seep in won t be able to leave and you may get mildew underneath the finish.

- Lazyman

Ok, so an oil finish, Like tung oil, BLO, or just plain mineral spirits?

-- Justin

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Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#6 posted 02-13-2019 07:00 PM

Correct, make sure they don’t have any resins added. Some of them have varnish in them so they only need one or two coats. I assume you meant mineral oil versus mineral spirits. Mineral oil is not a polymerizing oil and never really dries, or will feel oily until it finally does anyway, so I would not recommend that for this application. I really like Tried and True brand finishes. I usually use their varnish oil but their Original finish which is basically BLO with wax would be my choice for this. Of course you can always add the wax separately for a little extra water resistance. There may be other oil finishes that are better for this application but I have not used them.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Kilo19

104 posts in 705 days


#7 posted 02-13-2019 07:20 PM



Correct, make sure they don’t have any resins added. Some of them have varnish in them so they only need one or two coats. I assume you meant mineral oil versus mineral spirits. Mineral oil is not a polymerizing oil and never really dries, or will feel oily until it finally does anyway, so I would not recommend that for this application. I really like Tried and True brand finishes. I usually use their varnish oil but their Original finish which is basically BLO with wax would be my choice for this. Of course you can always add the wax separately for a little extra water resistance. There may be other oil finishes that are better for this application but I have not used them.

- Lazyman

Haha, yea mineral oil, sorry bout that.
Yea I do remember reading about people mixing BLO and wax. Come to think of it, that sounds good to me. Its just that furniture, plain wax right? and like a 50/50 mix of BLO? Or was it bees wax shavings and the oil?

-- Justin

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Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#8 posted 02-13-2019 09:18 PM

I’ve never mixed my own so I am not sure of the proportions for that. Not really worth the trouble for me. I think that the mixes usually use carnuba and/or beeswax. Some of the paste waxes have the same thing but they may have other additives or solvents to soften them? Personally, I usually just apply paste wax on top of the oil finishes when I want to give them a little more protection.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Kilo19

104 posts in 705 days


#9 posted 02-13-2019 09:20 PM



I ve never mixed my own so I am not sure of the proportions for that. Not really worth the trouble for me. I think that the mixes usually use carnuba and/or beeswax. Some of the paste waxes have the same thing but they may have other additives or solvents to soften them? Personally, I usually just apply paste wax on top of the oil finishes when I want to give them a little more protection.

- Lazyman

:thumbsup:

-- Justin

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runswithscissors

3060 posts in 2504 days


#10 posted 02-16-2019 11:18 PM

Ipe, which is often used for decks and porches, seems to perform well under wet conditions. Haven’t used it myself. You might be able to find some offcuts from a deck project.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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GR8HUNTER

6369 posts in 1191 days


#11 posted 02-17-2019 12:10 AM

Paul used Purpleheart in his boat : http://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/390009 :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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