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Forum topic by Nuvigil posted 02-13-2019 01:39 PM 633 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nuvigil

5 posts in 35 days


02-13-2019 01:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw refurbishing

Back in November, I was browsing Habitat for Humanity (re-store for donated unwanteds), and surprisingly came across a table saw and a jointer. I’ve been in the process of restoring the machines, and identified both as old Craftsman 113.? models. Using the respective manuals online I’ve spent several months disassembling and restoring them to working order, because due diligence needs to be paid for safety.

On the saw, the previous owner had wired the saw to a simple toggle light switch and mounted it to the front under the table using a corner bracket.

I wasn’t confident with this setup—I was scared at thought of how easy it was to accidentally turn on the saw, or fumble for the switch in case I needed to stop the saw for a number of reasons. So I bought a bigger machine switch, you know one of those with the big STOP button on it.

I’ve always had trouble with those pesky screw terminals, especially because I rewired the motor with 14 awg stranded cable. Obviously I can attach the wires to the terminals and turn the screw, but I’m always left with wires sticking out; it doesn’t look elegant. I’ve read up on all the tips on how to get a good connection, but after like 15 attempts I was wondering,

here’s the TL;DR: Can I solder the terminals to the switch? Is that a dumb question?

edit: To be clear, my goal isn’t elegance, I want a solid connection for the motor that draws 1HP


9 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3089 posts in 2470 days


#1 posted 02-13-2019 01:45 PM

Don’t salder the wire to the terminals. You can tin the wire with salder then attach it to the terminal with the screws provided. Tinning is just putting a light coat of solder on the bare wire ends. The solder when it cools makes the wire into one solid piece that you can bend around the screw before tightening and leaves you with a better connection.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View mnguy's profile

mnguy

226 posts in 3696 days


#2 posted 02-13-2019 01:55 PM

Soldering / tinning the exposed wires before screwing to the terminal is the best approach. I also find that twisting the strands together tightly can greatly reduce the stray strands that stick out from under the screw on the terminal.

If a wire strand is sticking out a bit, and it isn’t close to another terminal, it’s not really a danger. If it’s long and wandering over toward another terminal, then I would consider that a problem.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3315 posts in 1778 days


#3 posted 02-13-2019 02:00 PM

Not normally a problem. Twist the wire tightly and maintain the twist while forming the hook.

Alternately, you may be able to use a crimp on tab.

What kind of fence does the saw have? If it has a single handle sticking out the front that you screw to tighten, get rid of it IMMEDIATELY. They will not hold their settings and are extremely unsafe, especially for a newbie.

The best way to go is build your own fence. Aftermarket fences will cost way more than the saw is worth.

John Heisz has a good DIY table saw fence check it out.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Nuvigil's profile

Nuvigil

5 posts in 35 days


#4 posted 02-13-2019 07:52 PM

Thank you all for the advice. I ended up using the screws themselves to wrap the wire, tinned them, then screwed them in. I’m very happy with the solid connection.


Not normally a problem. Twist the wire tightly and maintain the twist while forming the hook.

Alternately, you may be able to use a crimp on tab.

What kind of fence does the saw have? If it has a single handle sticking out the front that you screw to tighten, get rid of it IMMEDIATELY. They will not hold their settings and are extremely unsafe, especially for a newbie.

The best way to go is build your own fence. Aftermarket fences will cost way more than the saw is worth.

John Heisz has a good DIY table saw fence check it out.

- rwe2156

The saw came with a fence and the prev. owner had attached wood to both sides of the fence. The knob on the front is to engage the gear for adjusting the fence position. To tighten there is a lever with some sort of rod spring mechanism attached to the other end. What do you think about this? I don’t like the fence, it doesn’t seem to have aged well to be square.

As I mentioned, I am trying to pay as much due diligence as possible when it comes to safety. The saw does not have a blade guard, anti-kickback knives, or a riving knife. Online parts from Sears (I guess they owned craftsman) returned unavailability for the blade guard mechanism for this machine, and when I look for knives on Amazon, all I see are results for zero clearance inserts, or riving knives that look specific to newer machines.

Some of the experienced woodworkers I see online are not using these mechanisms. Is that because they are experienced and know how to avoid accidents that these safeguards prevent?

View SMP's profile

SMP

456 posts in 203 days


#5 posted 02-13-2019 08:01 PM


Some of the experienced woodworkers I see online are not using these mechanisms. Is that because they are experienced and know how to avoid accidents that these safeguards prevent?

- Nuvigil

Sometimes when people are filming, they remove the guards etc for a clear shot to what is happening for the video. They usually will mention this somewhere, or in writing. Other times there may be times where a certain technique requires the guard not be in place. I would highly recommend using the guards whenever possible.

View Nuvigil's profile

Nuvigil

5 posts in 35 days


#6 posted 02-13-2019 09:55 PM


Some of the experienced woodworkers I see online are not using these mechanisms. Is that because they are experienced and know how to avoid accidents that these safeguards prevent?

- Nuvigil

Sometimes when people are filming, they remove the guards etc for a clear shot to what is happening for the video. They usually will mention this somewhere, or in writing. Other times there may be times where a certain technique requires the guard not be in place. I would highly recommend using the guards whenever possible.

- SMP

Just trying to get an idea here, can you give me an example of a procedure where an anti-kickback knife or riving is absolutely necessary?

View BalsaWood's profile

BalsaWood

110 posts in 1456 days


#7 posted 02-13-2019 10:30 PM



Thank you all for the advice. I ended up using the screws themselves to wrap the wire, tinned them, then screwed them in. I’m very happy with the solid connection.

Not normally a problem. Twist the wire tightly and maintain the twist while forming the hook.

Alternately, you may be able to use a crimp on tab.

What kind of fence does the saw have? If it has a single handle sticking out the front that you screw to tighten, get rid of it IMMEDIATELY. They will not hold their settings and are extremely unsafe, especially for a newbie.

The best way to go is build your own fence. Aftermarket fences will cost way more than the saw is worth.

John Heisz has a good DIY table saw fence check it out.

- rwe2156

The saw came with a fence and the prev. owner had attached wood to both sides of the fence. The knob on the front is to engage the gear for adjusting the fence position. To tighten there is a lever with some sort of rod spring mechanism attached to the other end. What do you think about this? I don’t like the fence, it doesn’t seem to have aged well to be square.

As I mentioned, I am trying to pay as much due diligence as possible when it comes to safety. The saw does not have a blade guard, anti-kickback knives, or a riving knife. Online parts from Sears (I guess they owned craftsman) returned unavailability for the blade guard mechanism for this machine, and when I look for knives on Amazon, all I see are results for zero clearance inserts, or riving knives that look specific to newer machines.

Some of the experienced woodworkers I see online are not using these mechanisms. Is that because they are experienced and know how to avoid accidents that these safeguards prevent?

- Nuvigil

Some of the older table saws have really crappy bladeguards and splitters that got in the way at times times so a lot of people end up removing them. Modern saws do a better job with the safety features. You can use the saw without the guards and riving knife \ splitter safely as well as long as you do things properly- use push sticks or push blocks, don’t try ripping any wood that is really stressed or badly warped, avoid standing in some award position, do not stand directly behind the blade, don’t do freehand cuts, etc…..

You can also use magnetic featherboards, jigs, etc… to help make things safer as well. If I were to purchase another table saw, I’d get one with a riving knife as I think those are the best thing to prevent kickback.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5364 posts in 3541 days


#8 posted 02-14-2019 04:19 PM

Best way is to use a terminal lug that you either solder or crimp on. I prefer the “U” shaped terminals.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2987 posts in 2323 days


#9 posted 02-16-2019 11:13 PM

The type of fence that uses a gripping finger on the far end is a poor design in my experience. No matter how firmly you tighten it, it cannot hold the fence solidly against a sideways force. Unfortunately, many older saws came with such a fence—Rockwell-Delta, Sears, and I think Powermatic.

A T-square fence is much better, assuming it’s well designed and solidly built. They also have the advantage (compared to fences with pipe rails) that you can simply pluck the fence off the table for crosscutting; with the pipe rails, you have to slide the fence all the way to the end to remove it. My first real TS was a Rockwell with that fence, and I hated it. Built myself a T square fence and used it for many years.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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