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Craftsman 15 Inch Drill Press

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Forum topic by Raymer posted 02-13-2019 01:01 AM 919 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raymer

92 posts in 935 days


02-13-2019 01:01 AM

I am in the process of turning my 2 car garage into a dedicated woodworking shop. I have been doing more and more over the years. I started with building storage buildings as a side job and bought a good bit of tools.

I currently have a Rigid R4512 10” table saw and am restoring an older Delta Unisaw. My bandsaw isn’t mine…..yet….but have a Powermatic 20” 3ph bandsaw.

What I have been working to obtain was a planer, jointer and drill press. Today I came across an ad that was posted only minutes prior. A Craftsman 15in 12 spd, 1hp. He was only asking $100. I thought there must be something wrong with it and there was no pictures. I sent a text asking for pics and he got right back to me. Well, I picked it up not knowing much about drill presses and after getting home, I tested a 2 1/4 ” forstner bit at 250rpm and it was smooth and clean.

Not sure about quality or any runout yet as I need to get dial calipers?

Even if this isn’t the greatest brand etc I am very happy to get it for just $100. I may find myself upgrading eventually, but I also may find it’s all the drill press I need.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.


15 replies so far

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

344 posts in 973 days


#1 posted 02-13-2019 01:55 AM

I don’t have the exact model, but my Craftsman drill press was my Dad’s. He always said it was the first toll he bought after him and my Mom got married (would have been 52 years this fall if I’m counting right…). So the drill press is about 50 years old and still runs great. It has seen A LOT of use over the years as well (my Dad used to do professional golf club repair back in the days of persimmon woods…), and I use it at least every month on different projects. It’s one of the power tools in my shop I can’t ever really imagine needing to upgrade. I might (someday) swap out parts, but the bones are solid and I can’t think of a task too big for it that any other DP could do significantly better.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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Ripper70

1378 posts in 1761 days


#2 posted 02-13-2019 02:00 AM

A little elbow grease and you got yourself a bargain there. Nice score!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Raymer

92 posts in 935 days


#3 posted 02-13-2019 11:45 AM


A little elbow grease and you got yourself a bargain there. Nice score!

- Ripper70

Only the big column has rust on it, any ideas on best way to get it back to newish looking?

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

1173 posts in 1241 days


#4 posted 02-13-2019 11:58 AM

Looks like a good buy. I bought a RAS and cleaned the column with some 400 grit wet sandpaper and 3-n-1 oil. It looked great after I got done but it need a regular application of paste wax (every 6 months) to keep it shiny.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

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ChefHDAN

1734 posts in 3702 days


#5 posted 02-13-2019 01:23 PM

If 400 is taking a boatload of elbow grease, a wire wheel brush in a drill can take it off pretty quick, and then you can “polish” it a bit with some 400

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

934 posts in 2437 days


#6 posted 02-13-2019 02:34 PM

I am lucky to have accumulated some really nice tools, but I love my DP like that one! My Craftsman Drill Press is a 113.213850, that I purchased new in 1984/85. It has been, and is, a great machine and I have not ever felt any reason to replace it in my workshop. I’d say you scored a good one there. Mine is a 1/2-horsepower machine, as you will see in some photos I will add.

I did let the column get rusty. My renewal technique was one I use a lot to clean up any rusty items: Spraying with WD-40 Rust Release and going after it with a wire brush in a hand drill.
On one or two spots that were hard to get, I sprayed them with phosphoric acid, and brushed it off.
I used emery paper of around 100 grit where i felt it was needed.
I use the same technique to get some rust I let accumulate off the table, as well as the chrome finish handle parts. I never felt the need for 400-grit level polishing own that column.
I did wax it all up after that, and now my shop has AC and heat so it isn’t very prone to rust again anyway.

Just for fun, here are those visuals:

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 935 days


#7 posted 02-13-2019 04:05 PM

Jim, nice man, glad to hear you have had good luck with it. I am going to start cleaning this one up today, it looks just like yours and think same model, but says 1HP.

I figured for $100 even if it needed some light work it was a good deal. So far though, it all seems to work, but the belt tension handle seems to be sticking. The guy I got it from was the original owner and said he has had it for years, but only used twice. For that reason alone I need to do some maintenance I think. Surprisingly though, the belts don’t look dry rotted.


I am lucky to have accumulated some really nice tools, but I love my DP like that one! My Craftsman Drill Press is a 113.213850, that I purchased new in 1984/85. It has been, and is, a great machine and I have not ever felt any reason to replace it in my workshop. I d say you scored a good one there. Mine is a 1/2-horsepower machine, as you will see in some photos I will add.

I did let the column get rusty. My renewal technique was one I use a lot to clean up any rusty items: Spraying with WD-40 Rust Release and going after it with a wire brush in a hand drill.
On one or two spots that were hard to get, I sprayed them with phosphoric acid, and brushed it off.
I used emery paper of around 100 grit where i felt it was needed.
I use the same technique to get some rust I let accumulate off the table, as well as the chrome finish handle parts. I never felt the need for 400-grit level polishing own that column.
I did wax it all up after that, and now my shop has AC and heat so it isn t very prone to rust again anyway.

- jimintx


-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 935 days


#8 posted 02-13-2019 04:06 PM

Here is pic of the ID plate.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1378 posts in 1761 days


#9 posted 02-13-2019 04:36 PM


A little elbow grease and you got yourself a bargain there. Nice score!

- Ripper70

Only the big column has rust on it, any ideas on best way to get it back to newish looking?

- Raymer


I’ve used Krud Kutter with some pretty good results. Minimal grunt work is a plus too. A good cleaning and an application of paste wax keeps the iron in my garage shop rust free.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

934 posts in 2437 days


#10 posted 02-13-2019 06:18 PM

Raymer, I really think you will like that DP. I see that your model no. is slightly different, which would explain the different motor, I’d think.
Mine is 113.213850
Yours is 113.213151

A google search with that model number gives a lot of results, and you can find the owner’s manual, if you didn’t get the original along with the machine. I think i can see that the switch configuration in yours and mine is different, as well.

FWIW, I have mine on a mobile base. It does not effect its use at all, and and it comes in handy to either relocate it for general purposes, or just move it away from its spot if i need to do more thorough floor cleaning.

Have fun!

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 935 days


#11 posted 02-13-2019 06:46 PM

Jim,

Thanks for your response, makes me feel like I a decent drill press to see others that have them. I have pretty much taken it apart and am cleaning it up to bring it back to as new looking as possible. Also didn’t hurt to see how it assembles and how it works.

Before I took it apart a neighbor brought over a tool he had to check runout? He said it was .003 at the chuck and that it was fine. Hopefully it will last me a few years or more. I don’t think I would need anymore of a machine than this. The test holes I drilled with a 2 1/4” forstner bit were excellent. Went through red oak like butter and no tear out.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8212 posts in 3052 days


#12 posted 02-13-2019 06:59 PM

Only the big column has rust on it, any ideas on best way to get it back to newish looking?
- Raymer

That column has hardly any corrosion on it that I can see – maybe just some built up crud, but it’s not bad at all. But if you have a lathe or can rig a way to spin it, it’s a pretty easy task to shine it up like new:

That is the column from my 1937 Craftsman drill press – about 2/3 of the way done. You can see how bad the column was on the right side in that picture.

Also, if you have it apart, easiest way to de-rust is evaporust or electrolysis. Evaporust is fantastic stuff, but you need to be able to submerge the whole part for it to really work good (there are workarounds though). Electrolysis is super effective, super cheap, and can be used on really large pieces. Here is the base of that same drill press that has been half done in the electrolysis tank:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 935 days


#13 posted 02-13-2019 07:33 PM

Brad,

That sounds great man. Yeah I was taking it down and will look into electrolysis. Would one of those kiddie pools work for submerging?

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8212 posts in 3052 days


#14 posted 02-13-2019 08:00 PM

That sounds great man. Yeah I was taking it down and will look into electrolysis. Would one of those kiddie pools work for submerging?
- Raymer
Kiddie pools, Rubbermaid containers, old 5 gallon paint buckets, wood frame covered in plastic sheet, etc… as long as it’s plastic (ie: non-conductive), you are good. The only downside to electrolysis, IMO, is the nasty mess it creates when using metal electrodes:

Pretty much anything you use as a container will be relegated to that task from then on. However, you can reduce the mess significantly by using carbon (aka: graphite) electrodes instead of metal ones. The water will remain clear (all the particulates will settle on the bottom) and it won’t mess up the container, so you can re-use it for other stuff after you are done. For that DP base, I actually just used a Rubbermaid bucket and carbon/graphite rods out of some old 6 volt lantern batteries:

For smaller stuff, I prefer Evaporust though – it’s less messy and can be re-used over and over again. I have an old 1 gallon paint bucket with a wire basket in it – which is great for dunking and de-rusting fasteners (nuts, washer, bolts, etc…) and other small parts.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2834 posts in 1456 days


#15 posted 02-13-2019 08:07 PM

Raymer, welcome to lj’s. Nice score! Someone else just posted about that same press a few weeks ago.

If you are using a phone to take pictures hold it sideways (horizontally) and they will orient properly.

+1 on the reusable Evaporust.

Again, welcome.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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