LumberJocks

Stain on Poly - Will it Stick?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by wilschroter posted 02-11-2019 01:03 PM 245 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

47 posts in 796 days


02-11-2019 01:03 PM

I’m finishing a project now where I have some boards that have a 2-Poly coat and others that have none.

I’m curious if I were to get some stain on the Poly’d boards – and leave it there (by accident) whether the stain would adhere at any point or just wipe away even days after.

I have a few more projects coming up where the construction will include both pre-finished and raw boards so this problem will come up in the future.


13 replies so far

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

264 posts in 391 days


#1 posted 02-11-2019 01:14 PM

It might depend on the type of stain. I believe a gel stain might dry on there due to its nature of more or less sitting on top of the finished surface.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

47 posts in 796 days


#2 posted 02-11-2019 01:26 PM

It’s an Oil-Based stain

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

170 posts in 50 days


#3 posted 02-11-2019 02:13 PM

Best to test so you know how long you have to get it off. I would think you have a window for removal with thinner, but not “days”.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2805 posts in 1211 days


#4 posted 02-11-2019 03:14 PM

The stain you apply will more than likely just sit on top of the poly and not actually stain the wood. In effect it may act as a glaze coat of sorts or simply wipe off. You need to sand the poly off of the components that have poly or do a glaze in an attempt to have the components match, once you stain the raw wood components. The other option is to apply 2 coats of poly to the raw components and then glaze the whole project to a tone/color you desire.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

47 posts in 796 days


#5 posted 02-11-2019 03:18 PM

@builtinbkyn – That was my next question. I really want to spray the poly on to get an even coat, but it would be tough in this application to mask the existing poly’d work entirely without some overspray.

In this case – if I poly spray and some of the spray gets on the existing poly’d wood – is that likely to show? I’ve never done it before so I’m curious your thoughts.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2805 posts in 1211 days


#6 posted 02-11-2019 03:32 PM

Overspray is going to happen when you spray. Masking off what you don’t want overspray on is the only way to prevent it. Any incidental overspray can be rubbed out, but any that is excessive will show and will take more work to remove. Research a glaze finish. I’ve done it in some restorative work where I needed to match an older stain/finish or had different species of wood adjacent to each other that would not take stain the same way or had vastly different grain patterns. Basically you’re putting color on top of the wood and not in it as a stain would do.

Is there a reason why you assembled something with wood that already had a finish and didn’t remove it prior to assembly?

Also, some pics of what you’re trying to do would help people give you advice.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

47 posts in 796 days


#7 posted 02-11-2019 03:37 PM

I have two projects – one that is almost done and one that is yet to assembled.

The one yet to be assembled is going to be a small master closet in poplar. I’ve ordered the materials to be stained/poly’d from the mill so that 90% of that work is done. Then I’m going to attach the face frames with non-stained/poly’d wood so that I can do a fill/sand on the joints for an even finish. All the rest of the joints will be hidden, so having factory-stained wood will be great.

The final step is to stain/poly the face frame. I could always do wthat with a brush (which I may do) but the sprayer just seems to leave me with such a better final product.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

407 posts in 174 days


#8 posted 02-11-2019 03:43 PM

I often use a gel stain over water-based polyacrylic because it can be easily wiped off the smooth finish, selectively staying on incised lines and undercuts, as in this relief carving:

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2805 posts in 1211 days


#9 posted 02-11-2019 04:11 PM


I have two projects – one that is almost done and one that is yet to assembled.

The one yet to be assembled is going to be a small master closet in poplar. I ve ordered the materials to be stained/poly d from the mill so that 90% of that work is done. Then I m going to attach the face frames with non-stained/poly d wood so that I can do a fill/sand on the joints for an even finish. All the rest of the joints will be hidden, so having factory-stained wood will be great.

The final step is to stain/poly the face frame. I could always do wthat with a brush (which I may do) but the sprayer just seems to leave me with such a better final product.

- wilschroter


A few thoughts and questions. So basically you have some pre-finished wood/shelving/cabinet carcasses/doors? arriving and then you’re making face frames for built-ins? Will the mill sell you a can of the same finish they’re using on your order? Most will do that. How do you plan on fastening the face frames to the carcass? Why not finish the face frames prior to installation? Or masking off the opening of the carcass would not be terribly difficult. It would take some newspaper/builders paper and masking tape. It was my impression your project was a chair/table or some other furnishing. Also, why be so concerned about matching what sounds like the interior of cabinets, unless you also purchased the doors and had them pre-finished as well? Just get the mill to send you some of the finish they’re using. If the species of woods are different, you’ll have to get creative in matching if that’s important.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

47 posts in 796 days


#10 posted 02-11-2019 04:17 PM

Bill that’s really helpful to know.

In this case I think I can get away with having the carcass and shelves, as well as some fixed supports for the shelves (I won’t be doing adjustable shelves) all done in pre-finished wood. For the face frames I’m planning on driving some finish nails directly into the face frame material (2.5”w by 3/4” thick) for solid support with some glue behind them. I’d like to then fill/sand those nail holes so that when I drop the stain/poly on it they can go away almost entirely.

Here’s a sketchup view of what I’m doing. My first closet job (my own house) so hoping it’s not too tough.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2805 posts in 1211 days


#11 posted 02-11-2019 04:41 PM

Pre-finish the frames before you install them. That will obviously take some accurate measuring and sound construction. Then some glue and a few brad nails to hold things together until the glue dries, and you’re good to go. Realistically, unless you picked some really unique finish, getting a close match to the inside of the carcass, which will mostly be hidden by clothing, shouldn’t be difficult. And as I suggested, ask the mill for some of the finish.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

47 posts in 796 days


#12 posted 02-11-2019 04:44 PM

Yeah I’m getting the same stain from the mill so matching it 1:1 won’t be that hard.

You wouldn’t attach them first so you can fill/sand the joints and fastener holes? I feel like if I want the cleanest finish, I’m always going to have some issue where the butt joints sit and the fasteners are just covered with a Mohawk product.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2805 posts in 1211 days


#13 posted 02-11-2019 04:58 PM

You may not be happy with simple butt joints that aren’t connected to the cross member mechanically. My opinion is they need to be mechanically connected – pocket hole screws or half-lap joint. If you want to do it the way you seem to be suggesting, use half-lap and glue and brad nail thru them. You shouldn’t have to fill the cross joints to hide them. That probably wouldn’t look very good unless they were painted. You can still pre-finish the wood you’re using for the frames. Brad nails are almost invisible. If they need to be, use some matching wax stick from Minwax to fill any brad nail holes.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com