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Where to buy a small scale kiln

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Forum topic by BFamous posted 02-10-2019 03:32 PM 450 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BFamous

263 posts in 391 days


02-10-2019 03:32 PM

Let me start by saying, yes, I know I could build my own… But I already have too many projects, and this is just one thing I don’t feel putting brain power or much effort into…

That said, does anyone know of a source for buying a finished kiln for small scale home use? I’m looking at basically one tree’s worth of boards at a time (mostly old oak trees, sometimes hickory or cedar and other random varieties here in NC). I’m fine even splitting them up into batches because I can’t use all of that much lumber at once and I’m not looking to sell the lumber. But I have access to trees and can get them milled, just need a better way of drying on an occasional basis…

Any leads would be appreciated.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com


13 replies so far

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Lazyman

2874 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 02-10-2019 03:41 PM

How big are you looking for (longest board)? Do you want it in your shop, or outside?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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BFamous

263 posts in 391 days


#2 posted 02-10-2019 03:50 PM

Good clarifying questions lazyman. I need it to be outside, no room in my shop. And up to 8’ long X 16” wide boards.

I guess I’d also be willing to “build” one if someone could point me to a kit that includes all of the important parts (fans, heaters, dehumidifiers, whatever is supposed to be in one). I’m fine with building a large box, it’s the technical aspects I am trying to avoid…lol

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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4wood

8 posts in 224 days


#3 posted 02-10-2019 05:06 PM

Do a search on this website. There is an amazing amount of information here. It is a website for professionals, but anyone can read it. You can spend days here reading about wood. There is a special section for kiln drying or just enter you search word and find what you want.

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/_hot_threads.pl

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BFamous

263 posts in 391 days


#4 posted 02-10-2019 10:42 PM



Do a search on this website. There is an amazing amount of information here. It is a website for professionals, but anyone can read it. You can spend days here reading about wood. There is a special section for kiln drying or just enter you search word and find what you want.

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/_hot_threads.pl

- 4wood

Thanks. I’ll check out that site. I’d really prefer to buy a kit/complete unit, but I guess I’ll draw up and build if I have to… It’ll just have to move to the back of the line after the shed and greenhouse…

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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WDHLT15

1803 posts in 2746 days


#5 posted 02-11-2019 01:13 PM

I run the Nyle L53 dehumidification kiln.

https://www.nyle.com/lumber-drying-systems/units/l53/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA14TjBRD_ARIsAOCmO9YmPaG470KSzp-kXL21-ciYfY1mh4ebB8rlkm2Ya1VzuqktzyW_6SQaAveVEALw_wcB

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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BFamous

263 posts in 391 days


#6 posted 02-11-2019 01:19 PM



I run the Nyle L53 dehumidification kiln.

https://www.nyle.com/lumber-drying-systems/units/l53/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA14TjBRD_ARIsAOCmO9YmPaG470KSzp-kXL21-ciYfY1mh4ebB8rlkm2Ya1VzuqktzyW_6SQaAveVEALw_wcB

- WDHLT15

Thanks. Do you use the L53 chamber with it, or did you build your own?

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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Wildwood

2556 posts in 2405 days


#7 posted 02-11-2019 02:19 PM

These free books little long in the tooth but really nice references to have whether buy or build your own kiln. Might help you prevent many drying defects or ruining the woods trying to dry.

Drying lumber
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/fpl_pdfs/fplgtr118.pdf

Air drying lumber
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/fpl_pdfs/fplgtr117.pdf

-- Bill

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builtinbkyn

2805 posts in 1211 days


#8 posted 02-11-2019 03:06 PM

A friend built a kiln last year. There’s much more to kiln drying wood than simply tossing it in and hoping for the best. There’s real science to it – that is if you want usable results. Also “a trees worth of wood” requires a pretty large kiln. It’s not something you’ll get out of a box.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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WDHLT15

1803 posts in 2746 days


#9 posted 02-13-2019 12:57 PM

I built my own chamber. It measures 11.25’ wide x 10’ deep x 8’ high. Can hold up to 1000 bf at a time. Here is a pic with the dehumidification unit shown on the back wall. Nyle has plans for how to build the chamber.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Lazyman

2874 posts in 1658 days


#10 posted 02-13-2019 02:36 PM

Danny, So is that basically an air drying chamber—no added heat? As our resident practicing forrester, any thoughts about how this compares to a DIY solar kiln or one with a heating unit? I am also curious what you think about how much faster or better this sort of setup is than just stacking it somewhere out of the weather and waiting for it to try naturally.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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WDHLT15

1803 posts in 2746 days


#11 posted 02-14-2019 01:09 PM

This unit has a heater. It has a dry bulb temperature probe and a wet bulb temperature probe. There is a computer controller that lets you set the dry bulb and wet bulb temp set points to control the temp and humidity for controlled drying (located in a control box outside of the kiln).

This is not an air drying chamber. The unit has a compressor and evaporator coils like an air conditioner. The heater heats the kiln, the heat evaporates the water from the wood, the water vapor is condensed back into a liquid, and the water runs out of a hose to outside the kiln. I monitor the amount of water that is being removed to get a sense of the drying conditions.

As to a comparison to a DIY solar kiln, this set-up dries wood much faster. It runs 24-7 while a solar kiln only dries wood when the sun is shining. Plus, at the end of drying when I reach my target of 8% moisture content, I can turn off the compressor and set the dry bulb temp to 150 degrees. Once that temp is reached, I hold it for 24 hours to sterilize the load so there is no possibility of any active or live insects, larvae or eggs. You cannot do this with a solar kiln.

I generally pre-air-dry my lumber outside under drying sheds to get the moisture content of the wood to 20% or below. Then, into the kiln. Air dried lumber (from 15 to 20% moisture content) going into the kiln will take about 6 days to reach the target moisture content of 8%, then another day for sterilization. The kiln can remove about 8 gallons of water a day from the wood, so you have to size the load going in to the wood’s moisture content to not over-load the water removal capacity of the kiln.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Lazyman

2874 posts in 1658 days


#12 posted 02-14-2019 01:43 PM

Great explanation. Thanks.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1362 posts in 2381 days


#13 posted 02-14-2019 03:04 PM

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-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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