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Looking for advice on finishing a shed with fascia board

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Forum topic by peter2396 posted 02-05-2019 12:24 AM 1330 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


02-05-2019 12:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shed joinery table saw wood help question

Hello, I recently built a shed (i guess?) with 3 walls to store firewood. The roof is just a bit unfinished

I want to cover all of the bare 2×4 with fascia board(material isn’t relevant to my question, unless you have advice for better material to use), but i want to cut the edge of the boards on the table saw with a 45 degree angle across the entire length to join the corners with a 45/45 joint rather than a butt joint (Because as you can see in the pic, both faces of the 2×4 are exposed and i want to cover all of them).

My issue is these cuts seem to get more complicated now that there is also the top piece to factor in, and I’d like all joints to be angled with the table saw so you don’t see any joinery. Any advice would be much appreciated, and the rood pitch is 3:12 or 14 degrees if that matters. Thank you!


14 replies so far

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John Smith

2780 posts in 1084 days


#1 posted 02-05-2019 03:47 AM

nice work on the shed.
I’m just wondering why you want to scab over the 2×4s ??
for aesthetic reasons or to protect the bare wood from the weather ?

.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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Snipes

459 posts in 3166 days


#2 posted 02-05-2019 03:09 PM

John i’m guessing cause it looks a bit like umm unfinished.
do you have room behind your d edge to get 1X material in there? If not you could use steel fascia cover, which is the way i would do it anyway.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#3 posted 02-05-2019 07:33 PM


nice work on the shed.
I m just wondering why you want to scab over the 2×4s ??
for aesthetic reasons or to protect the bare wood from the weather ?

.

.

- John Smith


Thank you very much, just for aesthetic reasons, I’m imagining a white modern look, almost as if it were a house to fit the finished look of the charcoal shingles on the roof and the barnwood sides. Cutting the angles for the material I use whatever it may be is really my main concern though

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#4 posted 02-05-2019 07:42 PM



John i m guessing cause it looks a bit like umm unfinished.
do you have room behind your d edge to get 1X material in there? If not you could use steel fascia cover, which is the way i would do it anyway.

- Snipes


Yes, it was because it looked unfinished. Also; yes I left room for that. The steel would be so much cheaper though now that you mention it, I’m only 16 so thank you for that suggestion I wouldn’t have thought of it. With the steel, is there a way to do corners? I can send another pic, but on the front of the shed there’s another 2×4 that I wanted to cover with the same material. Like I said I’m young with not much experience with exterior finishing techniques, so thanks again

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Snipes

459 posts in 3166 days


#5 posted 02-05-2019 08:36 PM

well it’s a bit hard to explain, but you start on the back by cutting a piece approx 3” longer than sub fascia -then hold piece up there put pencil mark on back of fascia -this is where you will cut bottom off and bend sides around -nail it up -then cut one side 1.5” longer than sub fascia cut bottom to fit (it will not get bent around) -then mark top cut and bend around -nail it up -now your ready for top piece you will cut it flush on both ends – nail it up.
You may want to put some soffit up first though?
for 16 you did a nice job on this shed!!

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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SMP

2916 posts in 827 days


#6 posted 02-05-2019 08:39 PM

I always grab cardboard and scissors and make templates out of cardboard against angles like that, once close with scissors can even refine the cardboard with a razor/utility knife once cardboard is in place, then use the templates to mark the material I am cutting.

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#7 posted 02-05-2019 09:51 PM



I always grab cardboard and scissors and make templates out of cardboard against angles like that, once close with scissors can even refine the cardboard with a razor/utility knife once cardboard is in place, then use the templates to mark the material I am cutting.

- SMP


Ahh okay thank you I’m going to try that

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#8 posted 02-05-2019 09:54 PM



well it s a bit hard to explain, but you start on the back by cutting a piece approx 3” longer than sub fascia -then hold piece up there put pencil mark on back of fascia -this is where you will cut bottom off and bend sides around -nail it up -then cut one side 1.5” longer than sub fascia cut bottom to fit (it will not get bent around) -then mark top cut and bend around -nail it up -now your ready for top piece you will cut it flush on both ends – nail it up.
You may want to put some soffit up first though?
for 16 you did a nice job on this shed!!

- Snipes


That makes a lot of sense thank you! I’ll see what I can afford when I’m off from school and I’ll definitely follow this if I go with the steel. And thanks for the compliment! I’m super into it so any free time I have goes to projects like this

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#9 posted 02-05-2019 10:02 PM

Here’s another picture, don’t mind the dip in the roof I ran out of wood and have to bolster it tomorrow

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#10 posted 02-05-2019 10:08 PM

While I’m on here, does anyone have advice on finishing the shingles? Does the last row go before or after the fascia is up? And do I just slice the extra off with a razor? I’ve never done a roof like this with only one section before so once again any tips are appreciated

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tomsteve

1095 posts in 2141 days


#11 posted 02-05-2019 11:38 PM

i’d leave that top/last row of shingles hanging over so water cant get in between the drip edge and shingles,run down under, and wreak havoc.
however, if youd like a clean look, peel the drip edge off along the top edge, lay the shingles, cut em flush, then put the dripedge on top of the shingle. might want to get some polyurethane caulk to seal the nail heads on the drip edge.

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Snipes

459 posts in 3166 days


#12 posted 02-06-2019 03:17 AM

cut that row off right now, fit your d edge and nail it on then cut and apply your last row using few nails as possible as they will be exposed (put a little black jack on them, or don’t they will never leak). doing it this way gives you finished look but still returns any water on top of shingles. hope that makes sense?
if you use steel fascia you slide that under d edge.
the same method applies if you use wood fascia but make sure you have it on before cutting top shingle.
If you want to use wood and 45 corners go ahead, use small pieces on each corner to test fit. you can even tack them in place to help measure outside corner. however i would start at back as i described earlier and just but them all, then end up front with piece that goes through..
If you were close I have plenty of fascia scraps

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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peter2396

9 posts in 668 days


#13 posted 02-06-2019 04:19 AM


cut that row off right now, fit your d edge and nail it on then cut and apply your last row using few nails as possible as they will be exposed (put a little black jack on them, or don t they will never leak). doing it this way gives you finished look but still returns any water on top of shingles. hope that makes sense?
if you use steel fascia you slide that under d edge.
the same method applies if you use wood fascia but make sure you have it on before cutting top shingle.
If you want to use wood and 45 corners go ahead, use small pieces on each corner to test fit. you can even tack them in place to help measure outside corner. however i would start at back as i described earlier and just but them all, then end up front with piece that goes through..
If you were close I have plenty of fascia scraps

- Snipes


Thank you for the fascia offer, but sadly I’m in New York and I see your profile says your in Minnesota. I’ll probably go with the steel anyway. I’ll put the d edge across the front sub fascia, I wasn’t sure if one went there since normally the roof would slant down their with a shingle cap on top; not just end. But if I read your response correct I assume I do need a piece along that edge. After putting the last row of shingles back on, do I fold the plain black part (top half that nails go into) over the sub fascia and nail it like I have in the picture, but this time over the new d edge? And how would I add shingles to that bare area toward the high part of the roof where I just stopped and folded it over in the picture because there wasn’t enough room for another row? I was confused and stopped temporarily. Sorry if I’m not understanding the roofing right away, I just want to get the procedure down so I don’t make mistakes down the road. Thanks for the ongoing advice!

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Snipes

459 posts in 3166 days


#14 posted 02-06-2019 01:32 PM

no you don’t want to bend shingle around, it will gat in way of fascia. so cut it off flush now, then put your d edge on, (now all water that hits d edge will return to top of shingles and down roof), now put your last row of shingles on. this gives you finished look, no exposed metal on top of roof.

actually it appears u may need 2 more rows, hard to tell from pic. but depending on exposure i would maybe put one more row on before d edge. just so no metal is showing on top of roof

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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