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Craftsman 113.xxxxx table saw Alignment

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Forum topic by coniferous posted 02-04-2019 12:11 AM 696 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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coniferous

6 posts in 224 days


02-04-2019 12:11 AM

Hello,

I am bran new to this forum so I apologize for posting for assistance. However; I have a huge dilemma. I own a Craftsman 113.xxxxx table saw and noticed three things I cannot seem to resolve:

1. the rear side of the blade is out of alignment by 1/32”

2. There is play in the arbor post.

3. The miter slots do not align to the table. Placing a square flush with the front of the table’s edge, the alignment of the edge and the slots are off about 1/16”.

My question is: Is this normal? Do I need to post pictures of these issues to bring clarity to what I am saying? Can any accuracy be obtained despite the misalignment?

Note: I purchased a Vega Pro 50” fence, and when I tried aligning it to the miter slot (required in the setup directions) it would NEVER stay! This is when I first noticed the issue. The fence SEEMS to be square to the blade when it is NOT aligned to the miter slots.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!


17 replies so far

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

83 posts in 336 days


#1 posted 02-04-2019 01:15 AM

Wow! Yep, got one of those beasts also! Your first two issues are probably just one… Loose arbor mounting bolts. From the back, near the motor, look underneath the top. There are three bolts on the front trunnion and three on the rear trunnion that must be loosened to adjust the arbor so that the blade is parallel to the miter slots. Remove drive belt and insert plate. From the back, loosen all six bolts. (The blade will have to be tilted to access the left front bolt.) use wood block thru insert opening and gently tap the REAR trunnion left or right until blade is aligned with miter slots. Re tighten all bolts and re check alignment…
As to the miter slots not square to front of table, I’m not understanding what you mean by 1/16 off…

Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View coniferous's profile

coniferous

6 posts in 224 days


#2 posted 02-04-2019 01:52 AM

What I mean is that when there is a square flush against the table edge it doesn’t square up with the miter slot.

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

83 posts in 336 days


#3 posted 02-04-2019 02:53 AM

Wow! I’ve never checked that! You made me go out to the shop and check mine… Same thing! It has never been a problem, and I bought this saw new in 1993! What is important is that the fence rails are at 90 degrees to the miter slots & blade, or if not, that the fence can be adjusted to be parallel to the blade at all points along the rails.
Regards, the Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1390 posts in 916 days


#4 posted 02-04-2019 02:59 AM

Your square might be out of square some. I would check it first. Draw a line, then flip the square over and draw a second line and all that.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5513 posts in 2827 days


#5 posted 02-04-2019 04:15 AM

The front of the table is immaterial. Adjust the blade to the the miter slot then adjust the fence to the miter slot, that is all you need.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View coniferous's profile

coniferous

6 posts in 224 days


#6 posted 02-04-2019 02:24 PM

Hello,

Made my adjustments this morning…

1. Adjusted the fence to the Miter slot.

2. Verified the “blade” was square to the miter slot.

Ran a test cut and it was Way Off!!!!

I am noticing the when the fence is square to the miter slot, the back teeth touch before the front teeth.
Perhaps the blade is bent??? Any input would be helppful.

Than k you all.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

341 posts in 2211 days


#7 posted 02-04-2019 02:25 PM

I have a 113 from the 1950’s. I tuned mine up a while ago, but if the arbor is moving, that is probably the reason for points 1 and 2.

I replaced the bearings in the arbor of my saw, and that cleared up a lot of issues. Then you need to make sure your trunion is parallel to your miter slots. I used PALS, but I’m not sure if it made that much of a difference.

Take a look at the thread I created for it.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View EeerWoodworker's profile

EeerWoodworker

24 posts in 238 days


#8 posted 02-04-2019 02:30 PM

Mark a tooth to index off of in the front, measure from the miter slot to this tooth, rotate the blade so that tooth is a the rear now, check the measurement there.

Now take a different tooth, its good to go 90 degrees out, see if the measurement is the same as with the first tooth, repeat the process from above with this tooth.

This lets you know if the problem is the blade or the arbor.

Some blades offset their teeth so you have to be careful there.

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

455 posts in 2446 days


#9 posted 02-04-2019 06:06 PM

I have a 113.xxxx table saw also. I set the front trunnion in the middle of its adjustment range and tightened it down. Next I loosened the three bolts on the rear trunnion. I then used clamps the move the trunnion until the blade was parallel with the miter slot. I used a dial indicator, but you don’t have to. Always measure the front and back distance using the same spot on the blade. You will have to rotate the blade. I leave the belt on. Once the blade is set, tighten the trunnion bolts.

Next set your rip fence to be parallel to the miter slot. Again on mine I use a dial indicator. The fence must be set fairly accurately. Last up is adjusting your miter gauge so that the fence is square to the miter slot.

Hope this helps.

View coniferous's profile

coniferous

6 posts in 224 days


#10 posted 02-04-2019 09:33 PM

Hello dschlic1,

Sorry to bother you with this question, but I would love to know how you use “Clamps” to move the trunnion. Let me know if you can.

Thank you,

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1464 posts in 2112 days


#11 posted 02-04-2019 11:40 PM

You might consider this: http://www.in-lineindustries.com/products/contractor-saw-pals/

I added this to my Powermatic 64A last year. I should have done it long ago. It made adjusting the blade to miter slot much easier.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View coniferous's profile

coniferous

6 posts in 224 days


#12 posted 02-05-2019 04:38 AM

Blade Front

Blade rear

Test cut

Cut not aligned/square.

Not sure where it’s not coming square. Please let me know if I’m doing something incorrect

Thank you

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

83 posts in 336 days


#13 posted 02-05-2019 12:08 PM

In my view, .003 front to back for miter slot parallelism is not bad at all. What is the runout of the blade? Wobble? Set the dial indicator as in either photo 1 or 2 with the indicator riding below the tooth gullets and rotate the blade by turning the motor pulley. Try this with different blades. Also check for debris on the arbor shaft and flange where the blade ts mounted. Your photo 3 looks like a crosscut. Now you have to ensure your miter gage has minimal free play in the slot and is set at 90 to the blade using a machinist square.

$.02

The Kentucky Toolsmith

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View coniferous's profile

coniferous

6 posts in 224 days


#14 posted 02-06-2019 04:57 AM

I wonder if the blade had anything to do with it.

Although I can’t find any bend in the blade I’m wondering if it is what is causing it to be out of square.

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

83 posts in 336 days


#15 posted 02-06-2019 01:55 PM

If you didn’t find a warp in the blade, did you have any significant runout when mounted?
More than .001 would be excessive. Examine the arbor flange and shaft closely for burrs or rough surface. A very small burr on the flange can magnify to a relatively large “wobble” at the tooth line. Similarly, a burr on the blade around the arbor opening will also cause wobble. I’ve seen this on cheaper blades. Another possibility is worn arbor bearings. Your first post mentioned play in the arbor post (shaft?). Did that play disappear after aligning the trunnions? Basically, you need to separately determine if it is a blade and arbor problem or an alignment problem.

$.02 more…
The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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