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How do you deal with West Systems Squeeze out?

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Forum topic by newwoodbutcher posted 02-01-2019 04:38 AM 1261 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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newwoodbutcher

787 posts in 3148 days


02-01-2019 04:38 AM

I’m building a set of nightstands and headboard for a friend with Baltic Birch plywood and mahogany. I’ve veneered Mahogany onto Baltic Birch plywood the the joinery being tounge and grooved into solid Mahogany trim. It’s kind of an engineering project for me. I’ve never worked with BB before except a few jigs and shop furniture. and my experience with epoxy is very limited. FYI, here’s the plans and photos of the project.


Turns out BB is really strong material, so I’m planning to epoxy reinforcing 3/4” BB strips along all the joints on the inside, which are mostly a 1/4” groove about 30” long, BB to mahogany trim.. My question is: how do you apply epoxy? I don’t mind a bit of squeeze out as it’s all on the inside but I want to limit it. I applied the first attempt with a chip brush and the results are a bit sloppy. I’m thinking a squeeze bottle with a neck like the Tire Bond bottles would work really well but cleaning the bottle afterwards?????
So what do you use to apply and spread epoxy and what do you do with squeeze out?
Thank you all in advance for your responses.

-- Ken


14 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

2499 posts in 2104 days


#1 posted 02-01-2019 06:22 AM

Why Epoxy? Titebond I or II more than enough.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1680 posts in 460 days


#2 posted 02-01-2019 01:53 PM

totally agree with Andre.
that much squeeze out could be a nightmare to control in large areas.
especially if you are not familiar with epoxy and all its idiosyncrasies.
look at the TiteBond products and see which one would suit your project the best.
TiteBond III will give you a longer open time.
my experience with putting catalyzed epoxy in a bottle or syringe for application,
that applicator is a “one time ‘n done” tool.
when my daughter worked in a hair salon, she saved a lot of the plastic hair color bottles
for me that had a long skinny neck and was perfect for adhesive applications in tight places.

.
.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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bondogaposis

5255 posts in 2649 days


#3 posted 02-01-2019 02:09 PM

I agree that epoxy is way overkill and not worth the expense and mess. However if you are determined to use it and want to apply it with a squeeze bottle, you can get cheap ones from Harbor Freight. You’ll be throwing them out after every use. Usually when I apply glue, epoxy or any other kind, I use tongue depressor style sticks that I make in my shop whenever I have a length of thin rip scrap. I just chop them into suitable lengths and keep them on hand as disposable glue spreaders.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8248 posts in 3096 days


#4 posted 02-01-2019 05:25 PM

The previous posters are right about not needing epoxy for this but handling epoxy need not be as hard as many people make it.
You could do it very easily and cleanly with minimal squeeze out and almost no mess.
Here’s how: http://lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/series/4499

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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LesB

2004 posts in 3741 days


#5 posted 02-01-2019 06:27 PM

I agree with everyone else on the need for epoxy.
You could use masking tape along the joints where the squeeze out will occur to prevent the epoxy from making contact outside the joint and then pull it off as it starts to set up. Still going to be messy. This tape method helps with the other glues too but you can let them cure before removing the tape.

-- Les B, Oregon

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CaptainKlutz

942 posts in 1792 days


#6 posted 02-01-2019 09:49 PM

+1 do not need epoxy

To answer the original question:
You can use acetone or MEK to clean up excess epoxy. MEK is absorbed into skin very easily and recommend Acetone.
Also note that just like when using water soaked rag to clean conventional wood working PVA adhesives; This will leave a slight ‘water’ ring around the area wiped off with diluted adhesive soaked into wood. You can minimize and make the ‘water’ ring disappear to naked eye with 2nd application of solvent on clean rag. But you will not be able to completely remove ALL epoxy. The area with diluted epoxy disappears under clear finish, but any dye or stain will likely be a shade lighter color in the area with diluted epoxy soaked into wood (just like any other adhesive)

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

787 posts in 3148 days


#7 posted 02-02-2019 04:05 AM

Once again, thank you all for a great education and practical advice. As you can see from the photos there is a lot of stress potential on some of these joints. I thought epoxy would make them stronger. Thank you Shipwright for the link, very helpful. I’ve decided to use Titebond Ultimate “clamping” the braces with brads. Much neater, easier clean up and overall easier to work with.
Thank you all again

-- Ken

View wingless's profile

wingless

26 posts in 40 days


#8 posted 02-15-2019 01:36 AM

The West System epoxy is one of my favorite go-to products.

It has very stable and predictable characteristics. There are many additives available so this may be tailored to the application.

Here is an example using fiberglass matting and color tint. Here is an example using smooth sanding filler.

My usage is w/ a small mixing cup and a digital scale. I can easily attain perfect mix ratios in very small or much larger batches (5 parts resin to 1 part hardener).

Their 206 Slow Hardener has terrific hardening characteristics, permitting “clean up” after about an hour, to remove / relocate material that is no longer liquid, prior to becoming hard.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3838 posts in 2286 days


#9 posted 02-15-2019 01:51 AM

I use blue masking tape around a joint when using epoxy. It makes for easy cleanup.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11213 posts in 3330 days


#10 posted 02-16-2019 02:32 AM



Why Epoxy? Titebond I or II more than enough.

- Andre

I also agree with Andre. Epoxy is overkill and not worth the Effort and Cost.

Richard

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View MikeNolan's profile

MikeNolan

8 posts in 409 days


#11 posted 02-17-2019 01:06 AM

I sometimes use epoxy on plywood for the long open time. Epoxy can be cleaned up with alcohol (DNA). If necessary I mix the epoxy with microballoons to reduce running.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8248 posts in 3096 days


#12 posted 02-17-2019 06:42 AM


I sometimes use epoxy on plywood for the long open time. Epoxy can be cleaned up with alcohol (DNA). If necessary I mix the epoxy with microballoons to reduce running.

- MikeNolan


Micro-balloons are a filler. They won’t reduce running much at all. You will have much better luck with a thickener like minifibres (my favourite but there are lots). https://www.fibertek.ca/shop/fiberglass-materials/mini-fibers/

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View wingless's profile

wingless

26 posts in 40 days


#13 posted 02-17-2019 09:47 AM

The West System epoxy and hardener mixes up as a liquid consistency. It is very runny when mixed w/o filler additives.

They offer six fillers to change the characteristics. The fillers offer increased adhesion, increased strength, improved lamination or sanding smoothness. West System Filler Selection Guide

The filler consistency can be adjusted from ketchup to peanut butter. (hungry now?)

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2200 posts in 872 days


#14 posted 02-17-2019 10:47 AM

TB II or III is plenty strong enough for the job at hand.

-- Think safe, be safe

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