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Best way to fix proud joint

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Forum topic by Travis posted 01-30-2019 05:23 AM 1160 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Travis

477 posts in 650 days


01-30-2019 05:23 AM

Topic tags/keywords: joint joinery rabbett question

Hello all,

Total novice question here. I am working on my first piece of furniture for my wife. It is a side table with ambrosia maple base and walnut top. I have finished assembling the base and some of my joints are a little proud. I’m wondering what the best way to trim them flush would be. I have a basic chisel, loads of sandpaper (hand and ROS), and some power saws (mitre, table, and circular). Any recommendations?

Please don’t pay too much attention to the joinery, like I said, I’m a beginner and this is my first piece of furniture. First time trying that joint. I made the mistake of cutting the joint before sanding, so what used to fit snug became a bit loose after sanding.

Thanks!

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.


29 replies so far

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Rich

5984 posts in 1472 days


#1 posted 01-30-2019 05:45 AM

For me, sandpaper.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Aj2

3414 posts in 2681 days


#2 posted 01-30-2019 06:21 AM

Ya sandpaper. You could even glue some sand paper to a piece of wood and use it like a file. Or just use a file and then sandpaper to smooth it.

-- Aj

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Travis

477 posts in 650 days


#3 posted 01-30-2019 06:45 AM

Perfect, that’s what I’ll do! Thanks!

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

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WoodenDreams

1161 posts in 794 days


#4 posted 01-30-2019 08:07 AM

I would use a detail sander, this would help to sand to a straight edge.

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EarlS

4009 posts in 3231 days


#5 posted 01-30-2019 12:40 PM

I sand the joints after I glue them up using a ROS. That way I can sand everything flush and get rid of any glue drips that might be on the boards before finish is applied. Use 180 or 220 grit.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16938 posts in 3501 days


#6 posted 01-30-2019 01:22 PM

If hand tools are something you’d like to explore someday, a block plane is the ideal tool for dressing that joint. Swiping the end grain with mineral spirits before planing softens it up a bit and makes it easier to plane. And sharp is everything with that operation. Short of that, a sanding block or rasp.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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BlueRidgeDog

712 posts in 662 days


#7 posted 01-30-2019 01:24 PM

This is common and in fact often planned as if you can’t hit it dead on, you want the end grain portion to be proud (especially say with dovetail drawer construction) so you can level the joint. Typically you use a plane, but sandpaper will do the job.

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Robert

4051 posts in 2364 days


#8 posted 01-30-2019 02:07 PM

A plane is going to do a better job than sandpaper, although sandpaper will work.

BTW, if you plan on using hand tools, one of the first purchases should be a block plane and a #4 smoother.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Sylvain

1083 posts in 3382 days


#9 posted 01-30-2019 02:28 PM

To avoid nasty surprises (blow off), follow the advice given in this video, starting at 30’.

Although, if you are a newbie, I can not recommend enough looking at all the Paul Sellers videos.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Travis's profile

Travis

477 posts in 650 days


#10 posted 01-30-2019 03:38 PM



I would use a detail sander, this would help to sand to a straight edge.

- WoodenDreams

That is a new term for me. I will check that out as I definitely appreciate the help sanding a straight edge.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View Travis's profile

Travis

477 posts in 650 days


#11 posted 01-30-2019 03:40 PM



If hand tools are something you d like to explore someday, a block plane is the ideal tool for dressing that joint. Swiping the end grain with mineral spirits before planing softens it up a bit and makes it easier to plane. And sharp is everything with that operation. Short of that, a sanding block or rasp.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

I would like to get some skills and experience with hand tools. I’ll have a look at block planes. Will a cheap big box store version do for something like this, or is it worth investing in higher quality as a beginner?

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

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Travis

477 posts in 650 days


#12 posted 01-30-2019 03:41 PM



A plane is going to do a better job than sandpaper, although sandpaper will work.

BTW, if you plan on using hand tools, one of the first purchases should be a block plane and a #4 smoother.

- rwe2156

Block plane and #4, got it. The hand planes are a bit intimidating as I haven’t figured out their numbering system yet. They look mostly the same to me, though I know there are important differences.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

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Travis

477 posts in 650 days


#13 posted 01-30-2019 03:44 PM


To avoid nasty surprises (blow off), follow the advice given in this video, starting at 30 .

Although, if you are a newbie, I can not recommend enough looking at all the Paul Sellers videos.

- Sylvain

I’ll check that video out. I love the Paul Sellers videos! Before attempting any actual construction, I watched mesmerized for hours as he took a rough log and turned it into a straight and square workpiece all by hand. I didn’t realize people still did that and it made me envious of the satisfaction he must get doing that by hand.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

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Travis

477 posts in 650 days


#14 posted 01-30-2019 03:44 PM



This is common and in fact often planned as if you can t hit it dead on, you want the end grain portion to be proud (especially say with dovetail drawer construction) so you can level the joint. Typically you use a plane, but sandpaper will do the job.

- BlueRidgeDog

Right…that’s exactly what I was going for. It was all planned….

Thanks for making me feel better ;)

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

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WoodenDreams

1161 posts in 794 days


#15 posted 01-30-2019 05:04 PM

I have seen the Paul Sellers u-tube videos before. I will say he demonstrates and explains the use of a chisel, cutting dovetails and the use of a plane on small boxes better than any of what I’ve seen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=722CaYczml4

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