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Need Help... How to deal with this trim issue (trim reveal / trim proud)

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Forum topic by RickDel posted 01-27-2019 07:24 PM 1387 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RickDel

53 posts in 641 days


01-27-2019 07:24 PM

I hope I put this in the right forum.

Hello, I’m a beginner woodworker who building a window cornice box similar to this:

However, I want to use corner trim in my build. My problem is the corner trim is proud of the bottom trim it butts into by about a 1/16th of a inch”. Here’s a couple scrap pieces to see what I’m talking about:


What’s the best solution for this situation? A couple things I’ve considered were just lightly sanding the edge of the corner trim (making it flush to the bottom trim) and caulking or maybe running the corner trim across the jointer to reduce it a 1/16” but I’m not sure that would even work. Any ideas or suggestions are greatly appreciated! (BTW, I may be overthinking this too…. it might look fine with a little caulk and paint, I just don’t want to risk it without getting some experienced advise) .

Thanks – Rick


15 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

357 posts in 2320 days


#1 posted 01-27-2019 09:14 PM

It’ s bit confusing since your first picture has nothing in common with the others.

You don’t say what tools you hare , but if you want the horizontal piece in your pics to be in the plane as the vertical, you could plane some off the backside of the horizontal piece.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1378 posts in 1755 days


#2 posted 01-27-2019 09:21 PM

Agreed that the pics are confusing. Another option, and maybe a simpler one to the suggestion by gwilki, is to add a strip of wood to the back of the vertical piece to bring it in line with the other.

However, it would help to have more context to your pics and to know what tools you have available to get the job done.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

2178 posts in 2796 days


#3 posted 01-27-2019 09:30 PM

Plane it thinner? or bend in the end ( i.e. SAND , FILE) to match the piece it is butting up to.

-- Petey

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

53 posts in 641 days


#4 posted 01-27-2019 09:41 PM

My first pic is of what I’m building, in case anyone was unfimiliar with a “cornice box”. One difference in my build is I want to add corner molding to at the corners.

My pics posted sideways but they show a mock up of what I have. I took a piece of corner trim and butted it up to the bottom trim. Might be difficult to see, but the corner trim is 1/16” proud of the bottom trim. I don’t want that and I’m curious how experienced guys would deal with this? Looks like gwilki suggests planning the corner trim down and Ripper70 suggests building the bottom trim up.

Thanks

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

53 posts in 641 days


#5 posted 01-27-2019 09:43 PM


SAND , FILE to match the piece it is butting up to.

- Peteybadboy

Petey, I was wondering if I could do that. It’s a 1/16 of an inch. You think I can do that without it being noticeable? Thanks

View clin's profile

clin

1121 posts in 1842 days


#6 posted 01-27-2019 09:47 PM

You could add detail to the end of the thicker corner trim (a bead or similar) rather than just round it off as you have in the photo. What would look good depends on the overall design.

I also agree with the idea of simply thinning out the corner trim. If you have a table saw, you could run it through to make it thinner. Or as mentioned use a hand plane.

I also agree with making the main trim thicker. By that I mean the trim that is vertical in your photos. Though I believe that is in fact the horizontal trim.

It is common to build up trim by layering simpler pieces on each other. Though don’t try to align the edges of pieces flush. I.E. don’t try to make the molding look thicker. That will show. Rather, step them one to the next. Make the new piece as thick or thicker than the corner trim and step it to the piece you already have.

Below is not an example of your situation, but it illustrates how you can build up molding from several pieces to create whatever you want.

-- Clin

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

396 posts in 805 days


#7 posted 01-27-2019 09:57 PM

Your corner stock needs to be thinner, if you keep the bottom moulding upside-down.

You could just flip the bottom moulding the other way.

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

53 posts in 641 days


#8 posted 01-27-2019 10:04 PM

Thanks for all the great advice….


Your corner stock needs to be thinner, if you keep the bottom moulding upside-down.

You could just flip the bottom moulding the other way.

- Jared_S

Jared, That was a thought too, so here’s a newbie question… Isn’t that trim supposed to go with the wide part at the bottom? If I flipped it, wouldn’t that be noticeably wrong? Like when people install crown upside down.

Thanks

View Bunyon's profile

Bunyon

14 posts in 1111 days


#9 posted 01-27-2019 10:27 PM

When I run into a situation like this, I always build the bottom trim up. A small piece 1\4” thick is all you need and you can make it invisable by the time it’s painted. In this case you may have to build up your crown moulding as well

-- Paul , Strathroy,Ontario, Canada

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

2647 posts in 1009 days


#10 posted 01-28-2019 12:07 AM

Bondo is your Friend

.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1382 posts in 1341 days


#11 posted 01-28-2019 12:19 AM

You are over thinking this. Just round it over with some sandpaper and be done with it.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View squazo's profile

squazo

185 posts in 2491 days


#12 posted 01-28-2019 01:27 AM

have the moldings cut so they butt up the other way.

or install a plinth block. This is what I would do.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1378 posts in 1755 days


#13 posted 01-28-2019 02:13 AM

This makes it a bit more clear…I think…

Still, I think building the profiled trim up to make it appear thicker is the way to go.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

53 posts in 641 days


#14 posted 01-28-2019 02:31 AM

Thanks guys…. I got the answers I needed.

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

2647 posts in 1009 days


#15 posted 01-28-2019 12:35 PM

Rick – this is a similar situation on my kitchen island trim.

I just sanded the end of the trim down to fit, caulked the joint, primed and painted.
after the countertop is permanent, I will run a bead of white
caulk along the top edge and it will pass any inspection.
now, if you are going to use nice wood and a clear coat, much more
attention to detail will be required. but just for paint; caulk it and call it a day.
good luck in your projects.

.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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