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Outfeed Support

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Forum topic by liveoutdoors9 posted 01-26-2019 11:18 PM 577 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


01-26-2019 11:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw outfeed

I finally have my hand me down Delta 10” contractor saw up and running. The one thing I’m concerned about is an outfeed. I’m on limited space in my garage so a full on outfeed table isn’t going to work. I was looking at one of the single stand roller outfeed, but the more I read, the more I see it as a hazard than a help. I came to find this Rigid Flip Top Portable Work Support. Looks more like a table style and i can put it away when done. My intent is a more long stock rather than sheets of plywood. Any thoughts on the possible effectiveness? It would fit my space needs and would be a cost effective option.


14 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

20177 posts in 2219 days


#1 posted 01-26-2019 11:27 PM

Whatever you use for outfeed support needs to be close enough to the saw that your material doesn’t sag before it reaches it. Then it needs to be long enough to support whatever it is that you’re cutting. My outfeed table is my workbench. When I used to work in my garage, I had them both on wheels and would wheel them out to the middle.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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therealSteveN

2614 posts in 936 days


#2 posted 01-27-2019 02:40 AM

I agree here. The purpose is to support the stock fully as it leaves the table. Allowing it to go a distance, and then support just a portion makes the stock change shape, and possibly direction. Maybe nothing happens, worst case is it binds to the blade because of change of course, and you get kickback.

Plenty of folding tables that attach per hinge to the saw, and have a drop leg to hold up the far end. Look online for outfeed tables for table saw, you will see a lot of options. Lotta guys like you with scant space. Rockler and a few others also sell them premade, with locking hardware.

-- Think safe, be safe

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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


#3 posted 01-27-2019 03:24 AM

When I say longer stock, I don’t mean 8 foot boards either. As I’m just starting out with the shop, most of the work I’ll be doing are table legs and joints.

Completely separate, there’s a furniture maker I’ve run into where I moved that charges $20/hour to mentor/use his full shop. Said he also has a candlebox project he offers to use each of the tools in the shop. Seem like a fair price to learn? I cannot find any type of wood working clubs in my area other than a wood turning club.

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olegrump

97 posts in 584 days


#4 posted 02-07-2019 09:37 PM

If you can’t put your workbench to dual purpose as an outfeed table, you have a couple of other easy (and CHEAP) options. I recently saw an “outfeed table” that was simply a plastic topped folding table like the kind one sets up for serving or extra seating at parties. (about 30” X 72”). There were short lengths of PVC pipe slipped on the legs to raise them to table saw height. (The legs had a bend in them part way up which kept the pipes in the right position)

If that type of table is still too big, try this little trick. Pick up an old ironing board, either from the curb on bulk trash day, yard sale or wherever. Make blocks to raise raise the board to table saw height. (Some have adjustable legs on them, so you’re home free with this kind) You can even replace the board with a rectangle of plywood topped with masonite.

Both of these fold up and out in seconds when needed, fold and store away quickly when done. Bonus for the first option, you can tell the wife that a bunch of her relatives CAN’T come to dinner because you don’t have a place for them to sit….. then DUCK

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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


#5 posted 02-07-2019 09:57 PM

Interesting thoughts. The more I’ve looked around my shop and have rearranged to find my best setup, the more I think I may turn my table saw 180 degrees. My saw currently feeds out to the garage door so the space was limited. I have an old closet door (probably 4×8ish) that I use as an extra bench for assembly and such that sits in saw horses. It would run perpendicular to the saw. If I spin my saw around, I could probably use it as an outfeed. It sits about 6 or 8 inches below the table saw height. I would assume I’d have to raise it up to the saw height somehow? Thoughts on ways to do it since my horses are not adjustable. This setup would essentially keep my shop as is so there’s no lost space. Added bonus is if god forbid a kickback happens it’s going through the garage door instead if the drywall and into the family room with the wife and kids.

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pottz

5030 posts in 1346 days


#6 posted 02-07-2019 11:19 PM

this is what i use,works great and folds up to save space.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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ChefHDAN

1379 posts in 3212 days


#7 posted 02-08-2019 02:08 PM

Welcome to LJ’s

I worked for years with 2 of the flip stops, and I think they are much better than roller stands. I need to fold up/roll away all of my tools to still be able to get the cars into the garage in the winter so I need good portability, and have found the 80’s era B&D workmates to be extremely useful, I generally see them on Craig’s List for around $20. I built a raised top for a WM here .. There’s also lots of other LJ’s with great uses for the WM in this thread

Having the table instead of the flip-tops, was a great change from continually hassling with adjusting the stands and a table is great for shorter 20” or so work where stands are useless. If you can build a stand for your closet door to get to about 1/4” or less below your saw height that could be a great solution. If you’ve bought the flip stops though I put a door on top of my two flip tops when I need an extra table,

This could be a portable thought for your outfeed too.

As for learning there are some great people on YouTube to gain some knowledge from, but there are also some real hacks, at my age my greatest inspiration and virtual teacher was Norm on TNYW. Rob Cosman is a woodworker and business man that does a lot of teaching and someone I’d be comfortable recommending to watch, his current Candle Box project is here on YouTube.

Overall Practice is the best teacher, good luck!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


#8 posted 02-08-2019 04:02 PM

Thanks for the comment. I worked on it last night and was able to spin my saw around and measure the distance that the saw horses were below. Bolting two 2×4 to the saw horses and laying the door on top puts me right at that 1/4 inch or so with enough clearance for the motor.

As the door was an assembly table, it still functions as that. The whole setup opened up a ton of space on top of it all.

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ChefHDAN

1379 posts in 3212 days


#9 posted 02-08-2019 04:07 PM

Awesome, that 1/4” should keep you from needing dado’s in the outfeed table too.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


#10 posted 02-08-2019 05:02 PM

It’s funny looking, but it’s the right height and it was all scrap. 2×6 base, half inch plywood on that, 2×4 on that. I’ll countersink the bolt in to attach them to the saw horses. The closet door will sit on top. I put the miter gauge through and it runs over the door with about a half inch or so clearance. As an added bonus, I don’t have to hunch down to the assembly table now either and the saw horses still fold up to store away.

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ChefHDAN

1379 posts in 3212 days


#11 posted 02-08-2019 05:11 PM

I saw a T-shirt that said it’s not stupid if it works, save the $$$ for stock and tools, it’s a long journey in this hobby, I’m amazed I started with just a drill and a circ saw some 25 years ago. Enjoy the sawdust, it’s very satisfying to put the finish coat onto a project.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


#12 posted 02-08-2019 06:03 PM

It’s enjoyable so far partially because my two year old has taken a considerable liking to being in the shop too. It’s also been a great start getting a bunch of well taken care of Delta and Dewalt tools from a friends father who bought a house fully furnished with a dream shop. It’s allowed me to splurge on a few other luxury items that probably weren’t needed, but wanted.

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olegrump

97 posts in 584 days


#13 posted 02-08-2019 07:16 PM

Great idea using the old closet door as an outfeed/assembly table. There are a lot of good ideas on YouTube for making your existing sawhorses adjustable so you could get the height right.

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liveoutdoors9

14 posts in 132 days


#14 posted 02-09-2019 02:00 AM

Pictures of the outfeed and just the shop in general. I ended up using a couple of carriage bolts and let it sit on the 2 bys. Bored through the door sonthe bolt heads sit inside the door keeping stationary. Was having to clamp the door when using it as a work table. They alleviates that issue entirely. Now I need to figure out what to do with all that space lol.

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