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Forum topic by NeophyteGrant posted 01-24-2019 11:52 PM 1866 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NeophyteGrant

147 posts in 1751 days


01-24-2019 11:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: burglary security tool chests tool boxes

Well. It happened. My shop was burglarized. Luckily, the thieves only made off with hand power tools and my Dewalt planer (read: things that can, in the same token, be replaced). I have some tips on securing your doors and windows if you want them (cameras are affordable and darn are they smart these days) but even the best laid plans to prevent entry often only slow or deter a thief—if they want in, they will get in. So I’ve thought about how to lock down the most important stuff if someone does get in.

That said: If a thief makes it into your shop, how do you secure the most valuable items? Do you? What lockboxes, jobsite boxes, secure, minimal space tool chests do you use?


25 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

5390 posts in 3231 days


#1 posted 01-25-2019 01:17 AM

I have not secured tools but my shop has no windows. I also have a monitored alarm system with motion detectors.

The alarm system also is for temperature in the shop to detect fires.

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Desert_Woodworker

8173 posts in 2457 days


#2 posted 01-25-2019 02:07 AM

Trust in God’s Blessings

-- Desert_Woodworker

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htl

5576 posts in 2402 days


#3 posted 01-25-2019 02:20 AM

“if they want in, they will get in”
That being said you don’t have to make it easy for them, and I would think for many trying to stop the one’s where it’s a prank or just to easy, leaving a door unlocked or a sledge hammer sitting by the door for an easy entry, can be fixed.
Slowing them down and having motion censers on some lights, may get them to looking for an easier target.
Just my $.02

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

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Kelly

3797 posts in 4186 days


#4 posted 01-25-2019 05:00 AM

Mindful of that if a fire breaks out, you need to be able to escape, hog wire over windows can be a big deal.

I agree with the cameras – critical ones difficult to get to and empty ones visible (hey, if someone points a gun at me, I’m not going to argue was to if it’s loaded).

Think in terms of “inside and out.” That is, if they do get past the door security, and exterior cameras, hidden interior cameras could be gold.

I second on the interior, motion activated lights. That’s a great second defense. It wouldn’t be too hard to use motion activation to trigger an alarm inside.

I am fortunate in that my shop looks like a house, which helps (everyone thinks it is my house). Making things hard to steal, once in, is a no go. WAY to many things and I wouldn’t play well with shop which requires me to pull things out of locked cabinets and drawers.

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CaptainKlutz

4896 posts in 2737 days


#5 posted 01-25-2019 06:34 AM

Sorry for your loss.

Besides insurance, recording serial numbers for police, making it hard with decent locks/deadbolts, and maybe a camera in high risk location; Can’t stop professional thief.

Amateurs break-in can sometimes be prevented with FEAR.
Some folks like to use ‘Owner only carries $50 worth of ammunition’ sticker in some obvious places.
But this leads to professional criminals stealing your guns.

I prefer to use this little sign:
———————————————————————————————————————
Removal of property from this premises will
result in detonation of many explosive devices.
Things here go BOOM, and you will die.
For your own safety, turn around and leave now;
while you still have legs that work.

I can find anyone, anywhere, and never stop looking.

Signed, Military ordinance specialist that lives here.
———————————————————————————————————————-
Put this message in a side window, garage door window, or one time put it on side door to shop; of every garage shop I occupy. Have never had a break in? So have no idea if it really works?

Also:
One key to amateur loss prevention is do not leave tools out in open/plain site when not in use, even inside cabinet doors can make difference; If they can’t see it, they don’t know to steal it.

Amateurs in search of fast & easy score, will hit your premises more than once after being successful.
Have a friend with small fab shop out building at his home, that has been burglarized many times; due easy back access not seen from house. To stop repeat visits, all you can do is; change locks, post some “Protected by ADT surveillance’ signs, add motion lights, visible and hidden cameras, and hope they leave you alone. Challenge is that help is always 3-5 minutes away, amateur smash & grab theft is less than 60 seconds. But if you get some decent video of them smashing your lights, and finger print or two; karma will swing your direction. :)

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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WoodenDreams

1433 posts in 1153 days


#6 posted 01-25-2019 06:43 AM

One may consider fake security cameras with motion sensors. A motion sensor that actives the green and red power light. and follows the motion of activation. Two of my windows have these in them facing the driveway and sidewalk. I also have two of these in my work area, facing inward to the shop. I do realize that this type of camera setup “only keeps the honest person honest”. I do keep a ledger of tools & equipment, with pictures and reciepts to back this up. Comes in handy for the insurance company. I do have some tools bolted or screwed to a workbench. Some of my equipment won’t fit through the door or window. If someone wants your stuff bad enough, you won’t stop them. Making it difficult for someone, also makes accessibility inconvenient for yourself also. Last fall one weekend, the shop of one of my friends was burglarized, They loaded a lot a tools into his truck that was in his shop, and stole his truck also. Only the truck was found a week later. There are many things you can do to deter a thief (cameras, sensors, alarms, security companies, etc.), but, don’t live in fear and paranoia.

View NeophyteGrant's profile

NeophyteGrant

147 posts in 1751 days


#7 posted 01-25-2019 05:08 PM

Thanks for everyone’s feedback. I’ve gone full bore and the door is now not getting forced in without some of the framing coming with it. I’ve also put cameras and motion detectors in, sensor lights, etc. I might be driving myself a little paranoid to want to lock up certain things INSIDE too, but I view it as maybe adding another chest for storage that also just locks as well. It’d be mainly for hand jigsaw, drills, etc. Burglaries screw with your brain. It’s not so much the theft but the violation of a space you spend so much time setting up.

What motion detector brands do you guys like? That’s also been a stumbling block for me.

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xeddog

360 posts in 4250 days


#8 posted 01-25-2019 05:23 PM


I prefer to use this little sign:
———————————————————————————————————————
Removal of property from this premises will
result in detonation of many explosive devices.
Things here go BOOM, and you will die.
For your own safety, turn around and leave now;
while you still have legs that work.

I can find anyone, anywhere, and never stop looking.

Signed, Military ordinance specialist that lives here.

I wonder what firefighters would say if they had to respond to a fire alarm/report???

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6184 posts in 4486 days


#9 posted 01-25-2019 05:47 PM

It would seem to me that a very loud fire alarm would be a good defense; one with a 120 decibel sound level combined with flashing lights.

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PPK

1872 posts in 2052 days


#10 posted 01-25-2019 06:08 PM


Trust in God s Blessings

- Desert_Woodworker

+1

-- Pete

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14359 posts in 5340 days


#11 posted 01-25-2019 06:16 PM

I have ring cameras in my shop and on the exterior. I like them a lot. They are tied to power which would be a weakness. Another option would be a PoE camera system with a battery backup.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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corelz125

3729 posts in 2218 days


#12 posted 01-25-2019 06:26 PM

Put one of these up

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3797 posts in 4186 days


#13 posted 01-25-2019 06:40 PM

On one of my shops, I installed the door backwards. Attempting to kick it in just made it more closed. Pulling the pins from the hinges would do no good because each of the three hinges had a screw removed and a nail or large screw (head removed) in a hole of each of the hinges.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4896 posts in 2737 days


#14 posted 01-25-2019 07:34 PM

I prefer to use this little sign:
———————————————————————————————————————
Removal of property from this premises will
result in detonation of many explosive devices.
Things here go BOOM, and you will die.
For your own safety, turn around and leave now;
while you still have legs that work.

I can find anyone, anywhere, and never stop looking.

Signed, Military ordinance specialist that lives here.

I wonder what firefighters would say if they had to respond to a fire alarm/report???

- xeddog

Makes no difference for me. Local fire AHJ is part of DHS permitting process for storing restricted materials. They stop by about once a year to say hello, training newbies on product recognition/familiarization during fire safety inspection. If actually called for fire, pretty sure they know in advance to bring marshmallows and lawn chairs. :-0)

——

I am really liking corels125 wind chime. Need to find/make me one of those!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

331 posts in 1659 days


#15 posted 01-25-2019 07:36 PM

I would think a large steel cabinet (second hand is fine) locked with padlock behind a bracket that makes swinging a hammer, etc difficult would help with easily transported tools.

Iain

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

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