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Marquetry shading with woodburning tool

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Forum topic by George Seifert posted 01-24-2019 12:03 AM 691 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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George Seifert

18 posts in 895 days


01-24-2019 12:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Has anyone tried shade with a woodburning tool instead of sand? I’ve made a feeble attempt (I’m new to woodburning) and haven’t had much luck. However, it seems like there could be a place for using a woodburner -especially for places where a fine line is required. Also it’d be nice to not have to heat up a big pan full of sand when just a small heat source would do.

George


8 replies so far

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shipwright

8453 posts in 3410 days


#1 posted 01-24-2019 04:38 AM

Yes, I have used it but it is not IMHO a substitute for sand. As you mention, for a fine line it can be useful. You could not achieve a sand shaded effect with one. The fine lines in the lattice behind the flowers here are burned with pyrography.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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George Seifert

18 posts in 895 days


#2 posted 01-24-2019 05:12 PM

Thanks.

As a followup I’d be curious to see other peoples sand shading setups. In particular, smaller versions that don’t require so long to heat up.

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Richard

11309 posts in 3645 days


#3 posted 01-25-2019 12:11 AM

Very Nice & Well Done George!

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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shipwright

8453 posts in 3410 days


#4 posted 01-25-2019 03:27 AM

This is what I use, an eight inch cake pan on a hot plate. It takes about a half hour to reach shading temperature.
I don’t find that a long time to wait. Shading is not something to be in a hurry about anyway. Use reptile sand from the pet store (natural colour, not dyed). It is the finest you will find.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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George Seifert

18 posts in 895 days


#5 posted 01-25-2019 05:02 PM

That’s basically the same setup I have except that I used Hermit Crab sand. It was the finest I could find at the time. Your reptile sand appears to be finer.

I’ve seen a picture of a setup where there was a small rectangular pan somehow attached to something like a soldering iron. Something like that might be nice for at least 50% of what I shade.

George

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shipwright

8453 posts in 3410 days


#6 posted 01-25-2019 08:19 PM

I use the pan in the photo but do most of my shading with a spoon. If that’s what you mean by smaller it works very well especially on small pieces. Here’s a video of shading some very small ones. You can disregard the music … it’s just for fun. :-)

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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George Seifert

18 posts in 895 days


#7 posted 01-26-2019 02:11 AM

Whew, those are some small pieces!

Here’s the small rig I was talking about. Turns out it was from Peter White. Looks like it would work good for your tiny pieces.

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shipwright

8453 posts in 3410 days


#8 posted 01-26-2019 03:26 AM

It’s OK I suppose but a spoon is really versatile. You can select the heat you want by taking from the centre or the side, the bottom or the top and you can move it around to suit your angle of attack with the piece. Try whatever you like and find what works for you.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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