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Looking for slot cutter for 1/4" MDF

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Forum topic by Robert posted 01-23-2019 09:39 PM 569 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Robert

3315 posts in 1778 days


01-23-2019 09:39 PM

I need to build a bunch of flat panel cabinet doors with 1/4” MDF panels. The MDF I’m using measures ~ 5.25mm.

The slot cutter that comes with the profile set measures 5.5mm. It seems like it should work, but there is too much slop and a noticeable gap, and a rattle.

I have not been able to find a slot cutter that will work. I’m using a CMT shaker set that has a a 5/16” arbor, 1 3/4” diameter.

Looking for help on this, as well as other options. I’ve thought about removing the slot cutter and plowing the grooves with a dado blade. Or buying an adjustable slot cutter set and shimming it up.

CMT has since replaced the set I’m using with a adjustable slot cutter, but I don’t want to buy a whole ‘nother bit set.

I’ve never used 1/4” MDF in the past I’ve always used 1/2” and the panel raiser set flush. I’m thinking maybe this is the simplest solution.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


14 replies so far

View mnguy's profile

mnguy

226 posts in 3696 days


#1 posted 01-23-2019 09:57 PM

Can you have the 5.5 mm cutters ground down to 5.25 mm by a sharpening shop? Alternatively, a lot of minutes with a diamond paddle?

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

133 posts in 257 days


#2 posted 01-23-2019 11:40 PM

Source different mdf?

1/4” sheets I get measure .010” heavy at .260”

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

5115 posts in 2607 days


#3 posted 01-24-2019 12:06 AM

I have done this before but my MDF fit my groves.

If it were me I wouldn’t change my stile and rail set up. I modify the the panel. Like in this drawing but you you would be taking off very little.

If you do have access to 3/8 thick material the extra weight would make you door feel more substantial.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2197 posts in 872 days


#4 posted 01-24-2019 12:39 AM

Faced with rattle, and a difference of .25mm I would be looking at a much cheaper fix. Space balls or more likely a good quality of caulk, squeezed out into very thin lines on a sheet of waxed paper. Freeze them. Insert them, and forget, your slop, wiggle, rattle it’s gone. Just make sure to inset the cutter enough to not get squeeze out. 3/8 should do. On MDF it’s like magic. Do a trial test on a few pieces of scrap.

I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand

-- Think safe, be safe

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1864 posts in 2614 days


#5 posted 01-24-2019 03:18 AM

If you pre-finish the panels then extra thickness of the added finish might take out some of the rattle.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

585 posts in 1759 days


#6 posted 01-24-2019 03:27 AM

Why not cut the slots on a table saw?

-- John

View Robert's profile

Robert

3315 posts in 1778 days


#7 posted 01-24-2019 02:39 PM


If it were me I wouldn’t change my stile and rail set up. I modify the the panel. Like in this drawing but you you would be taking off very little.

If you do have access to 3/8 thick material the extra weight would make you door feel more substantial.

I agree I changed the bit setup one time—not something I would look forward to.

Checked with my supplier they do carry 3/8” MDF. Problem solved, Thx AKGuy !!

FYI to everyone CMT now carries an adjustable rail/stile bit set.


If you pre-finish the panels then extra thickness of the added finish might take out some of the rattle.

- JAAune

Good point, but the main point of using MDF is to shoot the doors after assembly.

Faced with rattle, and a difference of .25mm I would be looking at a much cheaper fix. Space balls or more likely a good quality of caulk, squeezed out into very thin lines on a sheet of waxed paper. Freeze them. Insert them, and forget, your slop, wiggle, rattle it’s gone. Just make sure to inset the cutter enough to not get squeeze out. 3/8 should do. On MDF it’s like magic. Do a trial test on a few pieces of scrap.

I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand

The rattling is from panel/groove gap. Spacers won’t help that. In the past I have used caulk, but for me its a cheesy fix.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

397 posts in 1376 days


#8 posted 01-24-2019 03:22 PM


I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand The rattling is from panel/groove gap. Spacers won t help that. In the past I have used caulk, but for me its a cheesy fix.
- rwe2156

“Cheesy fix” It’s MDF for gawd sake!

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2197 posts in 872 days


#9 posted 01-25-2019 06:49 AM

I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand The rattling is from panel/groove gap. Spacers won t help that. In the past I have used caulk, but for me its a cheesy fix.
- rwe2156

“Cheesy fix” It s MDF for gawd sake!

- Jack Lewis

It makes a LOT more sense if you drag the rest of the thought along with it. Or are you just trying to pick a fight??

I wrote

“Faced with rattle, and a difference of .25mm I would be looking at a much cheaper fix. Space balls or more likely a good quality of caulk, squeezed out into very thin lines on a sheet of waxed paper. Freeze them. Insert them, and forget, your slop, wiggle, rattle it’s gone. Just make sure to inset the cutter enough to not get squeeze out. 3/8 should do. On MDF it’s like magic. Do a trial test on a few pieces of scrap.

I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand”

The link was to WC syringes, which is where I get mine now that I am no longer working as an RN. I use them to inject the caulk, much more efficient than a caulking gun, and you can make very fine lines.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Robert's profile

Robert

3315 posts in 1778 days


#10 posted 01-25-2019 02:12 PM

Didn’t mean to offend I’ve done the caulk thing before just not for me. Maybe cheesy was the wrong word.

I’ve got about 25 doors to make.

Rather use the 3/8 mdf than futz around with caulking.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

397 posts in 1376 days


#11 posted 01-25-2019 03:00 PM


I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand The rattling is from panel/groove gap. Spacers won t help that. In the past I have used caulk, but for me its a cheesy fix.
- rwe2156

“Cheesy fix” It s MDF for gawd sake!

- Jack Lewis

It makes a LOT more sense if you drag the rest of the thought along with it. Or are you just trying to pick a fight??

I wrote

“Faced with rattle, and a difference of .25mm I would be looking at a much cheaper fix. Space balls or more likely a good quality of caulk, squeezed out into very thin lines on a sheet of waxed paper. Freeze them. Insert them, and forget, your slop, wiggle, rattle it’s gone. Just make sure to inset the cutter enough to not get squeeze out. 3/8 should do. On MDF it’s like magic. Do a trial test on a few pieces of scrap.

I use a syringe, NO needle. I keep both 60 MM and the 10 MM in the shop. As useful as that third hand”

The link was to WC syringes, which is where I get mine now that I am no longer working as an RN. I use them to inject the caulk, much more efficient than a caulking gun, and you can make very fine lines.

- therealSteveN

And I wrote “Cheesy fix” It s MDF for gawd sake! ” How does MDF even satisfy the “do it perfect attitude” of some people. He is not going to put a French Polish on the cabinets! There is only so much you can do to “MDF” . Now my so called “trying to pick a fight” is put into perspective. MDF the choice of fine wood workers everywhere.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

133 posts in 257 days


#12 posted 01-25-2019 08:21 PM

And I wrote “Cheesy fix” It s MDF for gawd sake! ” How does MDF even satisfy the “do it perfect attitude” of some people. He is not going to put a French Polish on the cabinets! There is only so much you can do to “MDF” . Now my so called “trying to pick a fight” is put into perspective. MDF the choice of fine wood workers everywhere.

- Jack Lewis

Actually your explanation of the comment seems worse than the original comment…

Saying the craftsmanship is irrelevant because it’s MDF is ridiculous.

There are lots of custom $100,000+ kitchens with mdf door / drawer panels.. you may not like it, but it doesn’t make it any less true.

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

5115 posts in 2607 days


#13 posted 01-26-2019 12:26 AM


And I wrote “Cheesy fix” It s MDF for gawd sake! ” How does MDF even satisfy the “do it perfect attitude” of some people. He is not going to put a French Polish on the cabinets! There is only so much you can do to “MDF” . Now my so called “trying to pick a fight” is put into perspective. MDF the choice of fine wood workers everywhere.

- Jack Lewis

Actually your explanation of the comment seems worse than the original comment…

Saying the craftsmanship is irrelevant because it s MDF is ridiculous.

There are lots of custom $100,000+ kitchens with mdf door / drawer panels.. you may not like it, but it doesn t make it any less true.

- Jared_S


Exactly. A lot of hobbyist have no clue of the benefits of MDF, Melamine etc. in certain applications. Many badmouth those product and have never used them. They really no very little about them. They just read somewhere it’s bad and keep repeating. Tell a lie long enough and people will start to believe it just on hearsay.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View pottz's profile

pottz

4462 posts in 1282 days


#14 posted 01-27-2019 04:06 AM


And I wrote “Cheesy fix” It s MDF for gawd sake! ” How does MDF even satisfy the “do it perfect attitude” of some people. He is not going to put a French Polish on the cabinets! There is only so much you can do to “MDF” . Now my so called “trying to pick a fight” is put into perspective. MDF the choice of fine wood workers everywhere.

- Jack Lewis

Actually your explanation of the comment seems worse than the original comment…

Saying the craftsmanship is irrelevant because it s MDF is ridiculous.

There are lots of custom $100,000+ kitchens with mdf door / drawer panels.. you may not like it, but it doesn t make it any less true.

- Jared_S


sorry jared but im with jack on this one,im not payin no 100k for a mdf kitchen!. if you can sell that good luck,and soory for the fool that buys it!

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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