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Forum topic by BGWood posted 01-17-2019 04:01 PM 1235 views 0 times favorited 60 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


01-17-2019 04:01 PM

Hey everyone

I’m building a live edge slab black walnut dining table for my wife as an anniversary gift. (48’‘W x 76’‘L x 1.5’‘T) I decided to ensure the wood would be less likely to buckle or twist by slotting the wood and adding recessed C-channel iron to the underside to help create a rigid substructure to the body of the wood by using 4 threaded inserts per iron channel.

My question is…..I am anticipating that the wood will still move and shift and flex, but I am contemplating also using epoxy to help fill in the voids around the channels and the iron to create a strong bond to the wood to give the C channel as much “bite” as possible to the table.

What are your thoughts on using epoxy or just let it go as is?

see the pics for details.

the channel is 2’’ wide and 9/16’’ deep. it was recessed 3/16’’ to sit flush with the wood surface.

I am using steel tubing as a frame for the legs and have large steel top plates to mount to the wood slab.

any feedback and thoughts on this would be greatly helpful

thanks

-- Brian, Pennsylvania


60 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

502 posts in 918 days


#1 posted 01-17-2019 04:19 PM

The wood is still going to try to move, I would suggest skipping the epoxy and using slotted holes in the C Channel with screws into the wood to keep things flat and allow for movement. You may also want to extend your slots a little to give the slab room to shrink. No one sees the underside of a table, so give the slab some wiggle room.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

379 posts in 2543 days


#2 posted 01-17-2019 04:21 PM

the wood needs to move.. it is alive man. i don’t believe the epoxy would allow for expansion and contraction, also the metal channel should not fit to tight in length.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2736 posts in 3181 days


#3 posted 01-17-2019 04:24 PM

I agree with the above comment. You can’t (and shouldn’t try) to prevent wood movement, if you do it guarantees that the top will crack or split at some point. If the slab is properly dried and seasoned, you should get very, very little “buckle or twist” due to seasonal movement. I regularly work with large slabs and have never had anything twist out of shape once properly dried.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2055 posts in 2096 days


#4 posted 01-17-2019 04:30 PM

Is that epoxy in there yikes. It looks to be a very beautiful looking slab,certainly a presentation piece. So I would dig out that black stuff and pray for forgiveness.
Even go as far as to add wood back in orientated in the proper direction. “With the grain”.
Good luck

-- Aj

View BGWood's profile

BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


#5 posted 01-17-2019 04:31 PM

The channels have been slotted 1.25’’ in length to allow movement and the ends all have 1/4’’ to also allow movement.

the slabs were kiln dried and acclimated to the humidity and moisture in the home.

-- Brian, Pennsylvania

View BGWood's profile

BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


#6 posted 01-17-2019 04:34 PM

Appreciate the feed back so far…. i agree with all of you guy’s comments….. just am looking for additional input to support what I already thought would not be worthwhile to do and throw away money on epoxy if not needed.

i used 5/8’’ threaded brass inserts (16 total) to anchor the iron into place. (just have not anchored them down until I sand and Waterlox the underside

-- Brian, Pennsylvania

View BGWood's profile

BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


#7 posted 01-17-2019 04:35 PM

there is no epoxy in the slots at all at this point those are the painted steel channels i put in to test fit everything

-- Brian, Pennsylvania

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

379 posts in 2543 days


#8 posted 01-17-2019 04:35 PM

Sounds like your good to go. get building so we can see the finished product…

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2055 posts in 2096 days


#9 posted 01-17-2019 07:22 PM

Ok I get it now . I’ve never seen that before. Please share the show side with us .
I nothing further to add this is uncharted territory for me I bow out.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1919 days


#10 posted 01-18-2019 08:15 PM

How buckled and twisted was it before you planed it down? The initial drying is going to be the worst stress as the wood goes from 20% to 10% (or whatever). The drying then reveals the natural inclination of how the wood wants to be. The natural breathing a wood can do from season to season is going to be a much smaller moisture difference. Since the piece is a slab we don’t have to worry about joint lines. In my opinion the wood will breathe in the same manner as it did when first dried.

TL;DR: If you had a lot of planing to do on this piece due to buckle or twist, then you might need to be worried. If it wasn’t a big job, I think you will have a very stable piece of wood.

View BGWood's profile

BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


#11 posted 01-18-2019 08:36 PM

The wood was naturally pretty true and I had the moisture content down to 8-9% in it all over before moving to working with it. It only needed sanded on a wide belt sander and it took down all my epoxy fill in spots and levels any ridges in the wood. The wood has a slight cup overall but is very minimal. The bars are to help with keeping the cup from ever being an issue.

-- Brian, Pennsylvania

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1919 days


#12 posted 01-18-2019 09:39 PM

I’m not an expert (though I’ve worked with slabs, see projects), but I bet you are going to be just fine. I like the idea of using elliptical holes to allow for natural expansion like a breadboard.

View BGWood's profile

BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


#13 posted 01-19-2019 10:42 PM

Here is the underside after one coat of Waterlox and the c-channel now in place

-- Brian, Pennsylvania

View BGWood's profile

BGWood

35 posts in 63 days


#14 posted 01-26-2019 09:00 PM

Here’s after the final waterlox application for the underside

-- Brian, Pennsylvania

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

344 posts in 983 days


#15 posted 01-27-2019 12:00 AM

Man that’s some gorgeous wood you picked there

Share a pic of the other side please- if the grain on the underside is this nice I’d love to see the side you picked as the top

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