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Live oak slice for table.... post storm

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Forum topic by Panhandler80 posted 01-13-2019 06:06 AM 967 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


01-13-2019 06:06 AM

Howdy, folks. I’m pretty handy with wood… have done interior staircase in my home, picture frames, some fine furniture (with help), but I’ve never gone after this…

As you will see, it’s a big piece of wood. I thought I’d just let it lay suspended for a while and then get to grading / sanding. I’m hear (and sure appreciate yall input) because some internet searches keep talking about 1 year per 1” thickness. I’m cool with that. It’ll be a decade, but, okay.

What about these wood stabilation products? Pentacryl, in particular? It’s supposed to be for wet wood.

What should I do now?

EDIT: Tyring to lear this forum.

Okay… sounds like I’m in for a learning lesson. Yes. Live oak. I had a guy cut this slice about a month ago. It’s been sitting on damp ground since then. Today I got it under my house elevated a few inches off the ground on two pecan limbs sitting on gravel. By “under house” I mean under a hbome on stilts, so tons of ventilation. I could set up a fan… I guess. Give it a year, huh? That’s fine. No rush. After just a little research I thought I might hit it with Pentacryl while it’s still good and wet. Yall think skip that entirely?

he’s already got some pretty big voids. I was thiking I”d pour some acrylic in black in there before busing out hand planer and then sanding. Also not sure what to do about bark. It’s missing about 15 degrees of it. Otherwise, I’d try and keep it. Guessing I’ll liklehy pop it all off once that stage comes.

Weloome yalls thoughts. Learning. But sounds like no rush. Just glad I actually got it. So many people talked about getting it done, but none actually did. We had organic debris trucks come by today at my house. Second time so far. I’m thinking within 2 months all these neibhgoood logs will be gone. Got me a cool piece if I can figure out how to take care of it.

EDIT: THREE…

Still cant figure out how to post pictures. Good piece to have consideing all that was lost 10/10.


13 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2814 days


#1 posted 01-13-2019 06:13 AM

Some one will correct me if I’m wrong but I don’t think you can post pictures/photos until you have made at least 5 post. This I believe is to help weed out spam and/or porno photos etc etc.

Make some small talk and try on your 6th post to picture post.

Good luck

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#2 posted 01-13-2019 01:54 PM

Thanks, man. Will do!

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#3 posted 01-13-2019 02:14 PM

Here’s what I’m working with…. Any and all suggestions are welcomed. At least I’m giving it a shot.

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#4 posted 01-13-2019 02:17 PM

Black is from three nails. Not rot or mold or anything like that.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2272 days


#5 posted 01-13-2019 03:21 PM

If you can, cut a 2” hole right around where the existing hole is and keep the core so you can reinstall it. That might prevent additional cracks to develop that will cause the slab from basically splitting in half.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#6 posted 01-13-2019 10:21 PM

Mahdee,

Good idea. I’ve done same thing on plexiglass. Makes sense.

What about wood stabilizer made for green wood? Worth tossing some on? I’d also thought about a heavy duty ratchet strap around perimeter. Eh?

If I have 10 years to wait for proper drying that’s cool. Just don’t want to not know about an easy step now that will allow for prettier / easier work on down the road.

Thanks.

PH80

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Pat

24 posts in 273 days


#7 posted 01-13-2019 11:56 PM

that’s a nice chunk I wish I had it

-- Pat Elk Ridge Wild Woods

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#8 posted 01-14-2019 01:37 AM


that s a nice chunk I wish I had it

- alleyoop

Thanks, man. It came at a hefty cost, though. ;-)

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2272 days


#9 posted 01-14-2019 01:31 PM

I’ve never tried stabilizer and they seem to be very pricy. With that being end grain, it should dry up fairly quick; especially placed in a drafty area. That is why the crack so fast. I would start flattening and sanding the surfaces which will slow down the dehydration.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10862 posts in 1643 days


#10 posted 01-15-2019 01:47 PM

1 year/inch thickness assumes lumber that is much longer than it is thick. In your case, your “cookie” is thicker than long so the drying process occurs differently. For long lumber where the majority of the stock is face and edge grain, the drying is slower because the internal moisture doesn’t escape easily through those faces the way it does the endgrain. In those cases, I seal the endgrain to retard the moisture escaping those faces so that drying occurs at a more even, although slower, rate throughout.

In your case with the endgrain, I have a feeling that puppy is going to dry out MUCH faster than a year/inch. Unfortunately, I don’t think there’s much hope of avoiding some pretty large checking no matter how you tackle it. I would go ahead and resign myself to working dyed epoxy into my design ideas.

For now, I think you have already taken the appropriate action by storing it under the house and off the ground. Keeping it out of direct sunlight and rain is a good idea. Natural ventilation should be sufficient too, I wouldn’t worry about a fan.

Good luck with it!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Snipes

432 posts in 2750 days


#11 posted 01-16-2019 03:54 PM

That there is a big slice of wood.. Drying without splitting I believe will be impossible. I’ve dabbled with a few cookies myself (none that size) one thing i’ve done is cut along a started crack with jigsaw or sawzall, then you have one big split rather than a bunch of small ones. Mahdee’s idea might help. Do you know what you are using for base? Maybe a router jig to flatten it?
I would flatten it, put anchor seal on both sides, peel off bark, and start on base.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#12 posted 06-09-2019 11:43 AM

Hey guys, it’s been a while.

I have done NOTHING with wood. Oct 10 will be one year. Tree fell in hurricane and the log layed until late Dec or early Jan. After having cut the slice, it’s been under my house on two equal dia pices of firewood. Under house means home on 8’ pilings with all the shade and all the breeze in the world.

So far…. ZERO fissures spanning more than maybe 30% of diameter from core. Still haven’t decided on next step, but she’s looking good, IMHO.

Just moved houses and for the first time in my life, I have a spot for my OWN SHOP! Looking forward to making something neat out of this booger. Not in any rush. Baby coming in two weeks and lots of house projects here at “new” house post storm.

Will probably be looking for some input in a few months. I’ll be sure to keep you all posted with good, bad and ugly… I’m sure all will occur. With any luck not with same regularity.

PH80p

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Panhandler80

11 posts in 274 days


#13 posted 06-09-2019 11:45 AM



1 year/inch thickness assumes lumber that is much longer than it is thick. In your case, your “cookie” is thicker than long so the drying process occurs differently. For long lumber where the majority of the stock is face and edge grain, the drying is slower because the internal moisture doesn t escape easily through those faces the way it does the endgrain. In those cases, I seal the endgrain to retard the moisture escaping those faces so that drying occurs at a more even, although slower, rate throughout.

In your case with the endgrain, I have a feeling that puppy is going to dry out MUCH faster than a year/inch. Unfortunately, I don t think there s much hope of avoiding some pretty large checking no matter how you tackle it. I would go ahead and resign myself to working dyed epoxy into my design ideas.

For now, I think you have already taken the appropriate action by storing it under the house and off the ground. Keeping it out of direct sunlight and rain is a good idea. Natural ventilation should be sufficient too, I wouldn t worry about a fan.

Good luck with it!

- HokieKen

Update above the post you all are reading now.

Yes…. epoxy is most definitely an integral aspect of design at this point. Cracks and splits are surprisingly minimal, but some fill will be needed. I think when it’s all said and done, it’ll be pretty neat. Was a cool tree.

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