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Stanley No 5C are these parts correct?

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Forum topic by Im_no_expert posted 01-09-2019 11:54 PM 764 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


01-09-2019 11:54 PM

I recently purchased a Stanley hand plane from an antique store. I did a reasonable amount of research online to see what I was looking for before I ventured out.

I ended up buying a No 5C, I was fairly confident with the selection at the time, however once I got it home I started to notice somethings that seemed off.

I am posting all the pictures I took and asking for any input on what might not be correct, here are my assumptions.
I don’t believe the iron stamped Lakeside or the cap is the original for this plane, I also am not sure about the knob height since it is the tall knob but the body and the frog base suggest to me it should be the shorter knob.

My guess is this is a model from 1910-1918, but I do not feel that all the pieces match the model or the era.

I hope the pictures help, and help me understand if this was a good purchase. I will with hold the price I paid until all the beatings are complete, LOL.

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.


20 replies so far

View Beats85's profile

Beats85

31 posts in 158 days


#1 posted 01-10-2019 12:01 AM

From my studying that looks to be a mostly type 11, though I’d guess with maybe some replaced parts. From what I understand type 11s didn’t have Stanley embossed on the lever cap, but it still has the keyhole screw slot so my guess is it might be a replacement from a type 12/13? The knob is likely a replacement from a later plane date – my understanding is that high knobs were introduced roughly around type 13s (maybe 12s)? It’s also certainly not unreasonable to expect that, for whatever reason, the iron was replaced with a new one…maybe the original was used up, or damaged in some way.

A friend of mine just gave me a no. 4 and no. 5 he picked up, both of type 12ish vintage, and neither iron had the sweetheart logo but every other part of each plane pointed pretty clearly towards sweetheart era.

A few replaced parts doesn’t mean it was a bad deal – if it cleans up and works well then it was worth it!

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BlasterStumps

1298 posts in 804 days


#2 posted 01-10-2019 12:20 AM

Im_no, could you post a close up of the mouth of the plane seen from the bottom side?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


#3 posted 01-10-2019 01:06 AM

Here are two pictures of the mouth.

I’m not entirely sure I get the type vs model correlation, I also found this to be type 11 from my web research but it’s a No 5c? Is there a comparison for the comparison. Lol

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.

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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


#4 posted 01-10-2019 01:08 PM

There is also a stamped V6 under the tote, I didn’t see this until I cleaned up some of the grime.

Also noticed a 66 on the lever cap.

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

701 posts in 1341 days


#5 posted 01-10-2019 11:38 PM

Have you read this yet? https://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/27/stanley-bench-plane-typing/ Montgomery ward sold lakeside planes. As long as the iron takes an edge put it to work.

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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


#6 posted 01-11-2019 01:40 PM

Thanks corelz, I did read this good information there. I think where I am hung up is I believe the lever cap to be way off, and the Lakeside iron makes me think this was a replacement from the original. Reason being I looked at the Montgomery wards catalog from 1920’s and they list Stanley-Bailey planes separately from the Lakeside planes. and with the patent numbers most of what I have read this is probably pre 1920. It is tough to tell what is accurate when it seems like everyone on the internet has a comparison or a different type study.

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16109 posts in 2983 days


#7 posted 01-11-2019 04:41 PM

I’d say the cutter / blade / iron is clearly a replacement. And I agree the lever cap is inconsistent with the three patent date main body. The adjuster knob is bigger, pointing to T12/T13 at the earliest, but the orange background in said cap points more to T14/T15. Tall knob with straight base says T13 as well.

Entirely possible all but the iron shipped as one unit originally, as Stanley is know to have used whatever came out of the parts bins to assemble for-sale units.

Looks like a great user, and that’s what (I hope) you intended. I say congrats, clean it up a bit, and enjoy!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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corelz125

701 posts in 1341 days


#8 posted 01-11-2019 09:21 PM

Being passed around for almost 100 years the original parts might of been broke or misplaced. With a lot of these old planes you come across things that have you scratching your head. If you really want it to be as close to the type studies you can buy the parts. As smitty said it looks like it will be a great user as is.

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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


#9 posted 01-14-2019 01:04 PM

Smitty, that is my plan making it a nice user. I was wondering how to best clean out the grooves in the bottom? Any thoughts? sandpaper with a light scrub was my first thought, I don’t want to have a negative affect around the grooves too much so I was planning on using my silicone contour sanding grips to stay in the grooves.

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6163 posts in 2576 days


#10 posted 01-14-2019 01:18 PM

Base points to being type 12, which was a tall knob. Other parts could have been added/swapped later or as Smitty said, just happened to be stuck in a parts bin and put together that way at the factory, other than the Lakeside iron.

For cleaning out the corrugations, I use a bench grinder and wire wheel. A wire brush on a Dremel works, too, just a lot slower. It’s a user, so I wouldn’t worry over much about getting the corrugations down to bright metal, just get the dirt and crud out of them and leave the black oxidation—it’ll actually help prevent those areas from rusting.

-- In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2258 posts in 2354 days


#11 posted 01-14-2019 01:20 PM

For the grooves use some scotchbrite, ms or wd-40, and rub away, pick or awl to get the stubborn stuff. I’d check and flatten the sole first if needed so you dont have to clean the grooves again. Looks like it will make a nice user.

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KYtoolsmith

76 posts in 225 days


#12 posted 01-14-2019 01:49 PM

Yep, don’t over think cleaning the corrugations. Hand wire brush is usually enough. Mixed plane irons and lever caps are common on planes that come from old shops or schools that had several No. 5s or 4s. Replacement irons from a different maker are not at all unusual. Original iron gets worn and the owner could get a different iron at the local hardware store… Should be a great user!
Regards, the Kentucky Toolsmith.

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


#13 posted 01-14-2019 02:03 PM

Thanks everyone, I just wanted to make sure whatever grim is in the grooves doesn’t end up sloping up the wood, not super worried about some discoloration as long as it doesn’t affect the work piece. Next question would be, how do you all sand off the bottom and what I mean is what do you use for a flat surface under? I watched Paul Sellers video with the special block he uses, I don’t think that is necessary looking for a more economical solution.

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6163 posts in 2576 days


#14 posted 01-14-2019 02:44 PM

For flattening, I use a piece of granite. Find a place that makes countertops and ask if you can look through their cutoff. I did that at a local place, asking how much they would charge me for a small piece and they laughed and said “Take all you want out of that scrap pile, we have to pay to dispose of it.” Sink cutouts are a nice size, if they have some.

A couple things I learned later—the darker the granite, the denser and more stable it is and if you can find a piece that has been ground but not yet polished, it will be flatter than a polished piece. Not a huge deal if they are all polished, as it will still be flat enough for doing planes.

-- In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Im_no_expert

13 posts in 199 days


#15 posted 01-14-2019 07:04 PM

Thanks Jay, free99 is the best price everytime.

-- I cut this board twice, and it's still too short.

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