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Making 220 Dryer Splitter, looking for Help

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Forum topic by PatrickIrish posted 01-09-2019 11:25 PM 638 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PatrickIrish

143 posts in 2434 days


01-09-2019 11:25 PM

I need to splitter for my 10-30r dryer outlet. I use that for my planner, jointer, table, and dryer. I’m over having to unplug them and don’t want to wait much longer to have my dad wire in some 220s and a subpanel. Been waiting 1 year now.

I almost bought the first one shown on amazon for $70 but feel I can make one. However, I’m kind of lost how the two boxes are connected to the single plug. Any tips would be helpful.


6 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1150 posts in 1950 days


#1 posted 01-09-2019 11:44 PM

If you are having two outlet boxes, each box with a single outlet, you will need to have a junction box where the wires from the plug and two outlets will be sliced together if you want a “Y” configuration as in the first photo. The junction box is at the point of the three cords coming together. Like wires are nutted together in the box.

View EdDantes's profile

EdDantes

68 posts in 299 days


#2 posted 01-10-2019 01:25 AM

1) If you don’t have the wire and materials laying around, you probably aren’t going to save that much by DIY.

2) If you don’t know how that outlet in the picture is wired, it means this is not a great first DIY project. The safer option is to just buy the ready-made solution.

View PatrickIrish's profile

PatrickIrish

143 posts in 2434 days


#3 posted 01-10-2019 05:59 AM

Is there a wiring diagram somewhere I can follow? The 10-30 female outlets are $8 each and HD and the dryer male plug is $18. I have the 10awg wire already.

I’ve wired a vfd and 5hp motor but never essentially tied two outlets together, that’s the confusing part.

View bmerrill's profile

bmerrill

50 posts in 462 days


#4 posted 01-10-2019 02:53 PM

Rethink what you are doing.

10-30R outlets/wiring is hazardous as it has 2-120vac hots and a neutral, but no ground. Yes, the neutral bar is tied to the ground bar in the panel, but the neutral is a current carrying conductor.
A dryer uses both 120vac and 240vac. The 120vac return path is the neutral and for 240vac the return path is the opposing hot. Anytime the dryer is plugged in the neutral should be considered energized.

240vac tools are wired differently. They only use 2-120vac hots and require a ground, they do not use a neutral.

When you have been unplug the dryer to use the outlet you are using the neutral as a ground. It is against code to use a neutral as a ground. If you use a splitter and the dryer is plugged in then you will be connecting the ground of the tool to a current carrying conductor. This creates a shock hazard to the user.

-- "Do. Or do not. There is no try". Yoda

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

262 posts in 919 days


#5 posted 01-10-2019 03:07 PM



Rethink what you are doing.

10-30R outlets/wiring is hazardous as it has 2-120vac hots and a neutral, but no ground. Yes, the neutral bar is tied to the ground bar in the panel, but the neutral is a current carrying conductor.
A dryer uses both 120vac and 240vac. The 120vac return path is the neutral and for 240vac the return path is the opposing hot. Anytime the dryer is plugged in the neutral should be considered energized.

240vac tools are wired differently. They only use 2-120vac hots and require a ground, they do not use a neutral.

When you have been unplug the dryer to use the outlet you are using the neutral as a ground. It is against code to use a neutral as a ground. If you use a splitter and the dryer is plugged in then you will be connecting the ground of the tool to a current carrying conductor. This creates a shock hazard to the user.

- bmerrill

I am assuming all the tools he is using are also 220v and would also be using 2 hot legs and a ground. No code issue there provided that is how the motors are intended to be run. If the tool requires a neutral and a ground, than that is a no-no. Have not seen many tools like that, but certainly exists in the appliance world.

As far as making it yourself it is doable, but I wouldn’t do it. Even with the off the shelf cable, you are band aiding. You will do better to get proper outlets wired for each tool.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6081 posts in 1101 days


#6 posted 01-10-2019 03:13 PM

just get an electrician to come in :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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