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Triton height adjustment issues

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Forum topic by Robert posted 01-07-2019 03:49 PM 830 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Robert

3512 posts in 1956 days


01-07-2019 03:49 PM

Have the 3HP TRA001 router about a year. No problems till a couple months ago I noticed the bit dropping when lock released. Someone suggested did I remove the spring, as per the manual. I had not, so I removed the spring.

Since then the situation has gotten worse. If the last adjustment was downward, no issue, but if the last adjustment was upward, when the lock is released the bit will drop. It is a lot, almost 1/8” I estimate.

Triton tech support reply was “its the nature of the beast”. Not very reassuring. I can send it to them to “adjust the armature”.

Suffice to say, I’m not too confident about this. I bought the router thinking I could avoid the expense of a lift.

I’ve got a pretty big kitchen reface project coming up and I’m not really looking forward to shelling out the money for a router and a lift.

If anyone has experienced this and has a way to deal with it, TIA.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


27 replies so far

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scribble

215 posts in 2676 days


#1 posted 01-07-2019 04:30 PM

I have recently acquired the same router and experienced what you are describing. I was a little worried about this same issue when I first started using but then it stopped doing it for a few cuts then did it again. I will pay close attention tonight when I am trying to take 1/16” of the excessive laminate for my router cabinet build to see if it is doing it again.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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Tony1212

341 posts in 2210 days


#2 posted 01-08-2019 02:58 PM

Mine has always done this (I’ve had it for a few years). I just assumed it was due to the rattling and shaking moving the internals. I believe it’s called “backlash” where the teeth of the screws and/or gears have tolerances that allow for a bit of movement.

It was never that big of an issue for me since, when I release the lock, I’m changing the bit height anyway. And as for using the dial on the crank handle for repeatability, I’ve never trusted any machine to measure for me. I always use a ruler to measure. But I tend to buy inexpensive tools that usually have tolerances that can be overcome with doing direct measurements.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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Robert

3512 posts in 1956 days


#3 posted 01-08-2019 03:52 PM

How can it not be an issue when you release the lock and the bit drops, you’ve lost your reference point!!

I took the router out of the table yesterday and found the problem.

You are right there is too much backlash or slop in the gears. I think this is from use as the router did not do it when I first got it. I’m guessing it has plastic gears. I don’t think there is any use sending it back, but I’ll do it anyway.

Already started looking at router lifts & routers…....sheesh.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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builtinbkyn

2942 posts in 1416 days


#4 posted 01-08-2019 04:00 PM

I have the same router in my table. I’m not sure I understand the issue you are having. Maybe I’m using the router incorrectly as I do not engage anything when raising or lowering the bit. I used the provided tool to turn the spindle and adjust as necessary and then perform the task. Are you saying there’s a lock that needs to be engaged after height adjustment? If so, I have never done that but also never had issue with the height of the cut changing durning the operation. At least none that I have detected. Overall, it’s worked as expected. I’m going to take a look when I get to the shop to see if there’s a “lock” as you describe.

Edit: OK I looked at the router in the table. Is the “plunge lock lever” what you’re referring to? I don’t believe that’s required to use when the router is in the table. I could be wrong, but I’ve never engaged it and have never had issue with the height settings. The weight of the router seems to be sufficient to holed the router down during operation.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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josephf

217 posts in 2572 days


#5 posted 01-08-2019 11:41 PM

Well I had to install a router raizer http://routertechnologies.com/routerraizer.htm on mine due to the plastic part kept breaking .i did it twice then gave up and got the above .Really not sure it is going to fix that problem your having .I know bit still moves when i tighten the leverloc ,but dought it does like the issue being discribed . All I can say is ,the router is made up of alot of plastic ,what can we expect . Anyhow maybe the router raizer will help with your issue also.

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builtinbkyn

2942 posts in 1416 days


#6 posted 01-09-2019 12:42 AM



Well I had to install a router raizer http://routertechnologies.com/routerraizer.htm on mine due to the plastic part kept breaking .i did it twice then gave up and got the above .Really not sure it is going to fix that problem your having .I know bit still moves when i tighten the leverloc ,but dought it does like the issue being discribed . All I can say is ,the router is made up of alot of plastic ,what can we expect . Anyhow maybe the router raizer will help with your issue also.

- josephf


As far as I’m concerned there’s no reason to tighten the lever lock. It’s required when used above table and for plunge routing. There isn’t even mention of it in the manual for use in table. I have none of the issues that are described here because I don’t engage the “plunge lock lever”, which is what it’s called.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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scribble

215 posts in 2676 days


#7 posted 01-09-2019 12:45 AM

Yes the plunge lever lock is never used in a table mounted situation with the Triton. It is just back lash that is needed with this style of router, that I’m sure with some tighter tolerances in the rack and pinion assembly for raising and lowering the bit would eliminate this concern but then might make it very difficult to operate.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

20507 posts in 2332 days


#8 posted 01-09-2019 04:07 AM

I lock mine every time. Yes the bit can fall down when you unlock it. This has never bothered me. When I unlock it, I’m gonna move it anyway. I’ve had the router in my table for about 4 years. I’m pretty happy.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Craftsman on the lake

2994 posts in 3913 days


#9 posted 01-09-2019 04:26 AM

I’ve always locked mine. And I usually adjust it without the crank. It goes to the right point and i lock it in place. Sometimes I use the crank but not often. I think it’s a router with a built in adjustment crank but i don’t think it was ever made to be like one of those universal router lifts that are dedicated just to doing that.

That being said, I get it in the right place manually. Then again, I eyeball it and the cut comes out right. Doing repeat, identical cuts aren’t an issue for me as my cuts are usually one-offs.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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firefighterontheside

20507 posts in 2332 days


#10 posted 01-09-2019 12:42 PM

There is a worm gear in there. The original ones were plastic. Newer ones have a metal gear and they did a recall where they sent new gears to people. I guess make sure you don’t have the old one with a plastic gear.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3512 posts in 1956 days


#11 posted 01-09-2019 02:04 PM


As far as I m concerned there s no reason to tighten the lever lock. It s required when used above table and for plunge routing. There isn t even mention of it in the manual for use in table. I have none of the issues that are described here because I don t engage the “plunge lock lever”, which is what it s called.

Yes the plunge lever lock is never used in a table mounted situation with the Triton. It is just back lash that is needed with this style of router, that I’m sure with some tighter tolerances in the rack and pinion assembly for raising and lowering the bit would eliminate this concern but then might make it very difficult to operate.

The manual does not mention no using the lock lever. If you don’t lock it, what prevents the bit from gradually dropping when the motor is running?

Will give a try and let you all know.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

341 posts in 2210 days


#12 posted 01-09-2019 02:19 PM


How can it not be an issue when you release the lock and the bit drops, you ve lost your reference point!!

- rwe2156

I’m not sure what you mean by this. I’ve always used the table top as my reference point, i.e. one face and one edge of the piece I’m routing. I measure all my joinery form that face or edge and set my router bit to that measurement. When I move to the next cut of a different depth, I re-measure from the table top.

Have I been doing it wrong this whole time? Not being facetious. I’m actually a bit concerned. What I do now seems to work, but if there’s a better way, I’m all for that.

And I always lock my bit height with the cam lock. I figure modern table saws have a height lock (mine doesn’t because it’s 70 years old, thus why I mainly use my router for rabbets and dadoes) so I should use it on my router. I’ll have to experiment to see if I can leave it unlocked – not that it’s all that big of a deal to me.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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Robert

3512 posts in 1956 days


#13 posted 01-09-2019 02:42 PM

Tony, no I just work in a different way. No doubt if you are using measurements then the issue is moot.

I have different methods. When I make a fine adjustment I hold the test piece to the bit, eyeball the previous profile, and make the micro adjustment. So I need the reference point to do that.

That said, the router still shouldn’t do that, and mine didn’t in the beginning. So I think its a wear related issue. IMO its poor design and/or inferior materials. It is specifically designed to be used upside down in a table. But, its a known issue, even Triton tech support said, “its the nature of the beast.”.

BTW I’ve never used the height lock on either of my table saws, but the mechanism is totally different to a router.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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builtinbkyn

2942 posts in 1416 days


#14 posted 01-09-2019 03:47 PM

Raising the bit is how incremental cuts are performed. I really don’t understand how backlash can be an issue when raising the bit. At that point, the gear is fully engaged with the rack. But even when lowering the router/bit, the weight of the router keeps the gear against the rack. If the gear is stripped, that’s a different issue.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Robert

3512 posts in 1956 days


#15 posted 01-09-2019 06:01 PM

Whatever the reason, its happening and its not good. I think its a design flaw.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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