LumberJocks

Need some turning tools

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by mramseyISU posted 01-03-2019 02:24 PM 1364 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

597 posts in 3006 days


01-03-2019 02:24 PM

So I went and ordered myself a lathe last night. I had been looking at the new Midi 1216 Laguna but buy the time I had it all in my cart with the stand and bed extender to do the 16” diameter turnings I was darn near the price of a full size one with the 10% discount they are running on them right now. So in 2-3 weeks I expect to see one of those on my doorstep. Now I need to decide on what I’m going to do about lathe chisels. What do you guys recommend getting? Should I buy a 6ish piece starter set or should I be looking at individual tools? The other question is carbide inserts vs HSS tools, I like the idea of not having to sharpen with the carbide inserts but I’m not scared to sharpen either.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.


24 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1819 posts in 3190 days


#1 posted 01-03-2019 02:36 PM

It doesn’t matter whether you get Carbide or Steel. They all get dull. Carbide just lasts a little longer. there has been talk about not getting sets of tools as several might not get any use, so they would just be lying around.

If you have a grinder, and think you are going to use Carbide instead of steel, I would recommend you look into diamond Lapidary plates to mount onto your grinder to sharpen carbide. I use 120, 220, 360 and 1000 grits mounted against my CBN wheels to sharpen my inserts.

Using those credit card sized hones don’t and won’t sharpen the carbide. It just makes you feel good thinking you sopent 10-20 minutes rubbing your insert against the diamond thinking it’s getting sharp. It won’t happen….......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

347 posts in 1991 days


#2 posted 01-03-2019 02:45 PM

I would learn on a cheaper set of HSS tools. You are probably going to waste some steel learning how to sharpen so don’t go high dollar out of the gate. If you are going to do resins, inlays, other non-wood items you may want to get a carbide scraper or two, but I would not do strictly carbide. Learn all the basic tools and see what suits you best.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

576 posts in 2539 days


#3 posted 01-03-2019 02:51 PM

IMO buy the one that suits the style and type of work you plan on doing. If you but small you will eventually want bigger. If you have turned before you probably know which tools you need and use most. Getting a better grade of tool (costlier) will normally have better steel, last longer and sharpen with a sturdier edge. Make your own carbide tool; an insert, bar, ferrel and home made handle will be 10% of a purchased carbide tool and be just as good. Start slow on aux. tools and get them as needed.
See Cap’n Eddies video on carbide tools; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEkkHLIbHDo

azcarbide.com for inserts

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View lew's profile

lew

13534 posts in 5216 days


#4 posted 01-03-2019 03:15 PM

Three words- Easy Wood Tools

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

597 posts in 3006 days


#5 posted 01-03-2019 03:48 PM



Three words- Easy Wood Tools

- lew

Those are definitely on the radar. If I go that route though I’m wondering what ones I could get right off the bat.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2501 posts in 5331 days


#6 posted 01-03-2019 03:56 PM

+1 on the easy wood tools, having taught alot of classes , the thing with conventional turning tools is the ability to sharpen them , which is an art unto its self. Easy Wood eliminated that , not to mention since they are basically scrapers they also safer in my opinion .

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

597 posts in 3006 days


#7 posted 01-03-2019 03:58 PM

What do you guys think of the Ultra-Shear line Woodpeckers makes? Looks pretty comparable on the surface to the Easy Wood Tools stuff and I can get a starter set for about $10 less than the Easy Wood brand. Granted that’s a pretty small difference between the two in price.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

21727 posts in 2599 days


#8 posted 01-03-2019 04:20 PM

LJ KelleyCrafts sells carbide insert tools on his site. I have a set as do several other LJs I know. I’ve been very happy with my set and would definitely recommend his.

As far as carbide vs HSS goes, I wouldn’t want to be limited to one or the other. I have the 3-piece set from KellyCrafts but I have several HSS tools in addition. If it were me, I’d start with the carbide tools because they’re easy and you can do most anything with them and start adding some HSS tools as needed.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View lew's profile

lew

13534 posts in 5216 days


#9 posted 01-03-2019 04:25 PM

EWT has superior carbide. Also their new negative rake cutters make smoother cuts in acrylics and hardwoods.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

3039 posts in 3450 days


#10 posted 01-03-2019 04:37 PM

I’ve been turning about 5 yrs, and turned hundreds of items small up to ~14”, green and dry segmented turnings, and hollowing. I only use carbide some for hollowing. I made a set of carbide tools (see my projects), but after learning how to use hss tools I rarely use them. Carbide is the path to making things quickly, as they are easy to use, but carbide tools do not teach you anything about using hss tools. They are scrapers, and only ok for that. Sharper hss scrapers need to be used to clean up the tearout from carbide. Carbide is good for roughing in and hollowing where the surface is hidden.

My recommendation is learn to sharpen and use hss, start with cheap tools that work well, like PSI Bens Best or Hurricane. It doesnt hurt much to grind up a $20-$35 tool learning and trying different grinds vs a $100 tool you are afraid to grind differently because of the cost. In additions you can try 3 to 4 times as many tools to figure out what sizes etc you like. Down the road get $100 tools when you know specifically what you want.

Sharpening – depends on what you already have and the $. Some use belt sanders, most use 8” slow speed grinder, some use hi $ CBN wheels, most use AL oxide friable wheels. I use the latter for roughing in a grind, then finish with a Grizzly wet grinder (already had it) using Tormek jigs which can be used for both the bench and wet grinder. Resharpening on the wet grinder removes very little steel, so tools last a long time. A few sharpen free hand, vast majority use jigs, at leat for gouges. Wolverine vari grind 2 is probably the best choice. I use DMT mini hones to hone skews and hss scrapers.

Some tool sets are ok. They can be reground into something else if not used. For spindle 1/4, 3/8, 1/2” gouges, ~ 1 and 2” rough gouges, parting tool, 1/2 and ~ 1” skew, smaller 1/2-3/4 wide scrapers might be used.

Bowls – 3/8 and 5/8 gouges, various scrapers can be used for sheer and negative rake techniques to clean up after gouges.

Decide how you want to mount bowls etc, faceplate, chuck, tapped glue block. Chucks arent necessary but can be helpful/quicker for bowls and spindle work. PSI Barracuda line of keyed scroll chucks and a hi value option.

Good luck. The lathe is just the start.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

31905 posts in 4144 days


#11 posted 01-03-2019 06:02 PM

Harbor Freight does have a decent “Starter Set” of lathe tools….then you can figure out what you really need to buy after that…whether a full set, or just a couple chisels. The ones in the H-F set you don’t use, would be easy enough to grind into something you do want to use.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

597 posts in 3006 days


#12 posted 01-03-2019 06:22 PM



Harbor Freight does have a decent “Starter Set” of lathe tools….then you can figure out what you really need to buy after that…whether a full set, or just a couple chisels. The ones in the H-F set you don t use, would be easy enough to grind into something you do want to use.

- bandit571

I’ve been thinking about getting a couple carbides along with that kit and slowly replacing the ones that I end up using the most.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

21727 posts in 2599 days


#13 posted 01-03-2019 06:25 PM

Warning on the cheapest HF set. They are carbon steel, not HSS and don’t hold an edge well at all. You will get LOTS of sharpening practice ;-) HF also has a more expensive set that is HSS. I’d recommend paying the extra if you go that route. There is a big difference between Cstl and HSS in terms of performance and edge retention IMO.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

597 posts in 3006 days


#14 posted 01-03-2019 06:37 PM



Warning on the cheapest HF set. They are carbon steel, not HSS and don t hold an edge well at all. You will get LOTS of sharpening practice ;-) HF also has a more expensive set that is HSS. I d recommend paying the extra if you go that route. There is a big difference between Cstl and HSS in terms of performance and edge retention IMO.

- HokieKen

This is the set from HF I was looking at.
https://www.harborfreight.com/Professional-High-Speed-Steel-Wood-Turning-Set-8-Pc-61794.html

It’s $15 more than the cheaper set. The only thing with going that route is a hate buying the same tool twice. I just want to buy the damn thing and move on.

I could get an Ashley Iles starter set for about $230 and that isn’t bad for 4 good quality tools. I’ve got a few of their regular chisels and really like them. I’m not particularly concerned about sharpening them but I know there will be a learning curve compared to a regular bench chisel or a plane iron.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

21727 posts in 2599 days


#15 posted 01-03-2019 06:43 PM

The good thing about going that route is that you’ll figure out what tools you will use and what you won’t. Some turners love their skew chisels more than their own children. Others will stab you in the eye with a skew chisel if you try to get them to use it. Same with spindle gouges and various types of scrapers. In hindsight, I would go with the HF set then buy better tools as needed/desired. Just my $.02 of course, YMMV.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

showing 1 through 15 of 24 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com