LumberJocks

Coffee table build questions

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by ravensrock posted 12-27-2018 06:20 PM 727 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


12-27-2018 06:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m building a large 40×40 coffee table for a client. The plan is to have about 1/3 of the top lift (like a TV tray) and the other part hinged open for storage. I’ve run into two problems.

1) The part of the top that lifts is 14 1/8” wide. When closed the lift mechanism is about 13 1/2”. However I didn’t allow for the thickness of the sides or the 3/4” overhang. So I’m getting what you see in the first picture. I’m almost 2” short. Any ideas other than ripping a piece from the larger side of the top and gluing on to the shorter side?

2) The larger part of the top was to swing up from the center via a piano hinge on the side. The problem is that the sides are inset about 5/8” and it will hit the top of the legs. I thought I could add a 5/8” thick piece along the top “rail” of the barn door sides to make it flush with the legs and attach the hinge to that. Not sure how it will look though. Any other solutions? And do you normally have to mortise for a piano hinge?

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking


16 replies so far

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

749 posts in 423 days


#1 posted 12-27-2018 08:12 PM

For piano hinges I do mine flush with the top rail. I made a depth marking jig. I set the depth jig on the top rail of my chests I build, and scroll or pencil in the line, and chisel down to the line.

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


#2 posted 12-27-2018 08:57 PM



For piano hinges I do mine flush with the top rail. I made a depth marking jig. I set the depth jig on the top rail of my chests I build, and scroll or pencil in the line, and chisel down to the line.

- WoodenDreams

Thanks WoodenDreams. So you end up with one long mortise? Any suggestions for my other issues? Thanks!

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1101 days


#3 posted 12-28-2018 01:28 AM

It looks like you’re screwed on the part that lifts. I assume you built the table before you bought the hardware. Lesson learned.

For the other part, I’d skip the piano hinge and go with an articulating chest hinge that will lift up as it opens and clear the sides.

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


#4 posted 12-28-2018 01:44 AM

Thanks for the ideas Rich. I’m thinking I’m screwed on the lift part too. I actually had the hardware but didn’t allow for the thickness of the side or the overhang when determining how wide it should be. Looks like I might need to do some careful cutting and gluing.

I was really hoping to be able to use the piano hinge. It wasn’t cheap at Rockler. I’m not familiar with an articulating chest hinge. Do you happen to have any links? Thanks in advance.


It looks like you re screwed on the part that lifts. I assume you built the table before you bought the hardware. Lesson learned.

For the other part, I d skip the piano hinge and go with an articulating chest hinge that will lift up as it opens and clear the sides.

- Rich


-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1101 days


#5 posted 12-28-2018 02:03 AM


I was really hoping to be able to use the piano hinge. It wasn t cheap at Rockler. I m not familiar with an articulating chest hinge. Do you happen to have any links? Thanks in advance.

- ravensrock

You’ll need to shop around to be sure you get the right dimensions, etc, but this is what I’m trying to describe. Since it lifts the lid as it rotates, it should clear the obstacles behind it. It’ll all come down to how much it lifts and whether it clears your frame.

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


#6 posted 12-28-2018 02:16 AM

I was just looking at something similar on the Rockler site- a cedar chest hinge. I don’t think it will lift enough to clear the overhang/edge of the top though. From what I was reading the top needs to be flush with the back for this type of hinge. I’ll keep looking. Thanks again!

I was really hoping to be able to use the piano hinge. It wasn t cheap at Rockler. I m not familiar with an articulating chest hinge. Do you happen to have any links? Thanks in advance.

- ravensrock

You ll need to shop around to be sure you get the right dimensions, etc, but this is what I m trying to describe. Since it lifts the lid as it rotates, it should clear the obstacles behind it. It ll all come down to how much it lifts and whether it clears your frame.

- Rich

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

View tblank's profile

tblank

79 posts in 3482 days


#7 posted 12-28-2018 02:46 AM

The piano hinge mortise is easily done with a router and the proper rabbeting bit. Or even a straight bit and a straight edge guide. Would a “Soss” hinge be an alternate?

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1101 days


#8 posted 12-28-2018 02:58 AM


I was just looking at something similar on the Rockler site- a cedar chest hinge. I don t think it will lift enough to clear the overhang/edge of the top though. From what I was reading the top needs to be flush with the back for this type of hinge. I ll keep looking. Thanks again!

- ravensrock

That’s what I meant about shopping for the right dimensions. The one pictured says a max 3/8” overhang on the lid. Probably not enough for you, but I’d wager there are hinges that can do the 5/8 or 3/4” you need.

Anyway, best of luck. I’m sure you’ll figure it out.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1459 posts in 3362 days


#9 posted 12-28-2018 02:58 AM

Check the specs on these Blum Hinges If they are not a solution then I’d go back to the drawing board;
>glue the top into a single panel
>determine the size of the top panel to work correctly with the hardware, and re cut top
>Partition remaining space and configure framing to turn side opposite lift top to a pull out drawer assembly.

Good luck

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


#10 posted 12-28-2018 03:06 AM

I’ll look into them. Thanks.

The piano hinge mortise is easily done with a router and the proper rabbeting bit. Or even a straight bit and a straight edge guide. Would a “Soss” hinge be an alternate?

- tblank


-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

855 posts in 1615 days


#11 posted 12-28-2018 10:27 PM

I have some thoughts regarding the lift mechanism in your first photo:
1. Could you find a smaller mechanism like it that would fit what you have?
2. From your photo, it looks like you might be able to cut off 2” from the rear of the bracket so that it would then slide to the rear enough to accommodate the lid you have. You might then have to drill some new mounting holes.
3. You haven’t done any finishing yet. Could you remove 2” from the lid portion with the piano hinge and add 2” to the portion with the lift mechanism?
4. Maybe some combination of the above.

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


#12 posted 12-28-2018 11:01 PM

Thanks bilyo. I thought about all of those options and ended up going with option 3. I cut off about 2 inches from the hinged side and glued it up to the lift side. It’s in the clamps as we speak. Still not sure what to do about the hinge though.


I have some thoughts regarding the lift mechanism in your first photo:
1. Could you find a smaller mechanism like it that would fit what you have?
2. From your photo, it looks like you might be able to cut off 2” from the rear of the bracket so that it would then slide to the rear enough to accommodate the lid you have. You might then have to drill some new mounting holes.
3. You haven t done any finishing yet. Could you remove 2” from the lid portion with the piano hinge and add 2” to the portion with the lift mechanism?
4. Maybe some combination of the above.

- bilyo

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

View tblank's profile

tblank

79 posts in 3482 days


#13 posted 12-29-2018 12:25 AM

When I mentioned Soss hinges earlier, I meant to say take a look at the Soss barrel hinges. Easy to install. They may need a restrictor chain or similar (rod-stop block) to prevent overtravel. They will allow close to 180 deg. opening and can handle the weight. Also invisible when closed.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

855 posts in 1615 days


#14 posted 12-29-2018 03:39 AM

My first thought for mounting your piano hinge is to add a narrow strip at the top of the table side wide enough so its outside surface is flush with the legs. This would allow the hinge barrel to rest on the edge of this strip and make the lid swing beyond the legs. Such a strip would be mostly inconspicuous, but you could add a similar strip all around so that it looked like an intentional design feature. Otherwise, I think the articulated hinge idea suggested above is your best answer.

View ravensrock's profile

ravensrock

507 posts in 2155 days


#15 posted 12-29-2018 03:46 AM

Great minds think alike! This was the only option I could think of for the piano hinge. I was thinking of making a strip as wide as the top “rail” of the faux barn doors but I suppose it could be narrower. It would still need to be strong enough to support the weight of this heavy 1 1/4” white oak top.


My first thought for mounting your piano hinge is to add a narrow strip at the top of the table side wide enough so its outside surface is flush with the legs. This would allow the hinge barrel to rest on the edge of this strip and make the lid swing beyond the legs. Such a strip would be mostly inconspicuous, but you could add a similar strip all around so that it looked like an intentional design feature. Otherwise, I think the articulated hinge idea suggested above is your best answer.

- bilyo


-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com