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Old Machinery still pulls its weight

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Forum topic by JustplaneJeff posted 12-17-2018 01:32 AM 697 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JustplaneJeff

277 posts in 2322 days


12-17-2018 01:32 AM

SO I have a J.D. Wallace mortise that’s been in my shop for 15 years. I think its from the Late 50s or 60s, but still stood tall today when I had to mortise 40 white oak table legs. Didn’t miss a beat and almost outlasted my right leg, as its foot powered. Any one else enjoy using vintage machines out there.

-- JustplaneJeff


9 replies so far

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AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2728 days


#1 posted 12-17-2018 01:36 AM



SO I have a J.D. Wallace mortise that s been in my shop for 15 years. I think its from the Late 50s or 60s, but still stood tall today when I had to mortise 40 white oak table legs. Didn t miss a beat and almost outlasted my right leg, as its foot powered. Any one else enjoy using vintage machines out there.

- JustplaneJeff

Yep, they used to make machines that worked. Now they make machines you work on. Why? I think because so many what HF prices.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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JustplaneJeff

277 posts in 2322 days


#2 posted 12-17-2018 01:49 AM

Something about the feel of an old machine that has been taken care of, or even refurbished, makes me wonder about the history of it and what projects it has been involved with. That’s something a new machine don’t offer.

-- JustplaneJeff

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Aj2

2321 posts in 2217 days


#3 posted 12-17-2018 03:20 AM

That’s a nice mortiser Jeff.
I too like the Older machines made in the US. I found my work improved and my attitude.

-- Aj

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Planeman40

1420 posts in 3180 days


#4 posted 12-17-2018 06:59 PM

Almost all of the machines in my shop are “vintage”. 1940s Delta wood lathe and 6” belt sander, 1940s Walker Turner 16” bandsaw, 1950s Sears drill press, 1970’s Delta 6” jointer, 1970s Belsaw 12” planer, etc. I’m sorta “vintage” myself and bought many of the above NEW!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#5 posted 12-17-2018 07:17 PM

I have a 40’s era Atlas jointer and a Boice Crane drill press from the same vintage. Both were project tools I restored and both are rock solid users. I recently acquired a 1936 South Bend metal lathe. I love old, American made ‘arn!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5210 posts in 4379 days


#6 posted 12-17-2018 07:32 PM

I am the proud owner of an old King Seely/Craftsman drill press. Probably 1952. Still ALL original, and working like a champ. Next is a Dayton/Craftsman 7” grinder that is complete and original (except for the wheels). Then, a Craftsman compressor I bought in the late ‘70s.
Shure don’t make ‘em today like those were made. That’s a shame.

-- [email protected]

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Phil32

579 posts in 322 days


#7 posted 12-17-2018 09:02 PM

In my junior high school wood shop we had an even older mortising machine. (BTW it’s foot operated, but not foot powered. We had electric motors even then.) We also had a tenoning machine that cut both sides and length of a tenon in one pass. The cabinet model table saw had a double arbor, so you could bring up a cross-cut blade or ripping blade. All of those machines are gone, along with what was taught.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Kazooman

1325 posts in 2371 days


#8 posted 12-17-2018 10:25 PM

Any idea what your Wallace mortiser cost new back in the “late 50s or 60s”? It would be interesting to see how that translates into 2018 dollars and what you could get for that amount of money these days. I am certain that you could do much better than the aforementioned HF machines, but probably nothing as massively built as your mortiser.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1420 posts in 3180 days


#9 posted 12-18-2018 03:06 AM

One MAJOR difference between the old machines and the new machines is the old machines usually came without the electric motor. You bought that separately. Many of today’s machine come with the motor and it is often built into the machine making it difficult, if not impossible, to find a replacement at a much late date.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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