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Quick finish over stain?

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Forum topic by chad515 posted 12-16-2018 01:38 PM 397 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chad515

7 posts in 337 days


12-16-2018 01:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have some Oak and Ash panels that I glued up. I stained them with Minwax oil-based stain, and then my wife painted some words/designs on them using acrylic paint. These will hang on the wall, so I’m not too concerned about protecting them (they won’t be touched or spilled on, etc.).

I now wonder if I need to put a finish on them. I was not planning to, but I wonder if that’s a bad idea. So my questions are:

1. Do I need to put a finish over the top? Or does the stain already provide a bit of protection against discoloring?
2. If I need a finish, what’s a quick finish that I could put on that wouldn’t change the appearance much?

Thanks for any help!


6 replies so far

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WoodshopTherapy

34 posts in 408 days


#1 posted 12-16-2018 01:58 PM

Unless you’re going for the rustic look, I would put a finish over the top so it’s easier to dust and keep clean.

I recommend a spray finish using an aerosol can. You can choose either a polyurethane or a lacquer. The lacquer dries faster, but it’s more toxic, so you need a well ventilated area and a respirator with carbon filters.

I hope that helps. Post a photo and show us your work!

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge at Home Improvement Woodworking

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Redoak49

3844 posts in 2292 days


#2 posted 12-16-2018 01:59 PM

You could try a spray can shellac and use a light coat. A couple of very light coats should minimize the acrylic from any runs.

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Rich

4157 posts in 893 days


#3 posted 12-16-2018 03:19 PM


I recommend a spray finish using an aerosol can. You can choose either a polyurethane or a lacquer. The lacquer dries faster, but it s more toxic, so you need a well ventilated area and a respirator with carbon filters.

- WoodshopTherapy

Correct to use an aerosol to reduce possible smearing. Totally wrong that you only need ventilation and a respirator for lacquer. You should use a respirator for any finish, spray, brush or wipe, that contains VOCs, and do it in a ventilated area.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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chad515

7 posts in 337 days


#4 posted 12-16-2018 08:44 PM

Thanks so much. So, I guess aerosol it is. Is there such a thing as matte finish in any of these? I see satin spray lacquer. I guess that could work.

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Rich

4157 posts in 893 days


#5 posted 12-16-2018 09:21 PM



Thanks so much. So, I guess aerosol it is. Is there such a thing as matte finish in any of these? I see satin spray lacquer. I guess that could work.

- chad515

Mohawk offers matte and flat lacquer in aerosol cans.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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dannmarks

858 posts in 885 days


#6 posted 12-16-2018 10:47 PM

Lacquer dries fast… and that keeps dust from being in the finish. I usually spray out side my self. And if I do not trust the weather or it is windy I spray in a shed with whole front open (Big doors) so that no leaves or less bugs get on it and of course rain. Rule of thumb is 50 degrees is needed for it to dry properly.

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