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Forum topic by bgilb posted 12-12-2018 05:18 PM 530 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bgilb

101 posts in 3479 days


12-12-2018 05:18 PM

I have some rough polar I’m milling. It’s about an 8% moisture level in Texas. So far I jointed one edge and the ripped it in half. My cuts are 2.5” and 3/4” thick and varying length. The rough lumber is 4/4 7” by 6 feet. So right now I have a little bit to play with on the width and thickness. I was planning on jointing one face in a couple days then planing it close to the thickness. Then make sure it stays flat. Does this all sound right?


11 replies so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2883 posts in 2768 days


#1 posted 12-12-2018 05:31 PM

I plane to thickness first, then joint an edge, then cut to final widths working off the square side. That way everything is the same thickness and width. Flatness will depend on how much internal stress is released when you ripped it in half. The same goes for a straight edge. If the board twists or warps you could wind up with varying thickness caused by twist/warp as the board runs through the planer.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1906 days


#2 posted 12-12-2018 05:37 PM

Face first, since the edge references off the face.

If it’s dry, I try to dimension and glue up with it a day for panels. If not, I don’t stack them or lay them flat.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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bgilb

101 posts in 3479 days


#3 posted 12-12-2018 05:59 PM

Sorry I probably should have added I only edge jointed once so I could then ride that edge along my table saw fence. Otherwise the wood was really rough and would probably twist and stuff different ways. I also don’t have a bandsaw. So I plan to face jointer again, then edge joint, then run it in my planer. I’m more talking about the process of getting down to final dimensions. I don’t want to have any cupping or bowing or any surprises.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#4 posted 12-12-2018 06:07 PM

why are you ripping them in half?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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bgilb

101 posts in 3479 days


#5 posted 12-12-2018 06:30 PM

They’re 7” wide and my jointer is only 6”

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AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#6 posted 12-12-2018 06:44 PM

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bgilb

101 posts in 3479 days


#7 posted 12-12-2018 07:00 PM

It’s fine to rip them though right? The final pieces I need are only 2.5” so I’m not losing any material. Plus the 7” pieces were somewhat heavy and cumbersome.

I like that sled though I think I’ll make it!

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AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#8 posted 12-12-2018 07:13 PM



It s fine to rip them though right? The final pieces I need are only 2.5” so I m not losing any material. Plus the 7” pieces were somewhat heavy and cumbersome.

I like that sled though I think I ll make it!

- bgilb

Yes you can rip them. But if you ever want or need wider there are options.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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jutsFL

172 posts in 262 days


#9 posted 12-12-2018 07:17 PM

Face joint first. Rough face down to jointer.

Profile joint second, with jointed face against jointer fence. Now you have one perfect 90deg.

Plane to thickness, with face jointed side down in planer bed. Now you have top and bottom faces flat and parallel, with one side profile at a perfect 90deg to top and bottom face as well.

Finally, rip widths you need on TS, with jointed profile edge against TS fence (last remaining rough edge towards TS blade).

Squared stock.

There is more than one way to go about it, this has proven well for me.

If you have a bend in the board, always place it on the jointer first in the convex position (curve bowing up), whether its the face or profile.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5317 posts in 2729 days


#10 posted 12-12-2018 07:52 PM



Face joint first. Rough face down to jointer.

Profile joint second, with jointed face against jointer fence. Now you have one perfect 90deg.

Plane to thickness, with face jointed side down in planer bed. Now you have top and bottom faces flat and parallel, with one side profile at a perfect 90deg to top and bottom face as well.

Finally, rip widths you need on TS, with jointed profile edge against TS fence (last remaining rough edge towards TS blade).

Squared stock.

There is more than one way to go about it, this has proven well for me.

If you have a bend in the board, always place it on the jointer first in the convex position (curve bowing up), whether its the face or profile.

- jutsFL

His wood is wider than his jointer and the finished product is only 2.5 inches wide. I think he is OK ripping and then joint as normal.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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jutsFL

172 posts in 262 days


#11 posted 12-12-2018 08:39 PM


His wood is wider than his jointer and the finished product is only 2.5 inches wide. I think he is OK ripping and then joint as normal.

- AlaskaGuy

Agreed. I missed the part earlier where hes stated the board was larger than jointer bed.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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