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Cutting 45 degree miter in counter top

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Forum topic by dfox52 posted 12-12-2018 04:38 PM 550 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dfox52

29 posts in 2116 days


12-12-2018 04:38 PM

I’m making a small counter area for a kitchen alcove. My counter top will be made of 1 1/2 thick glued up cherry, 18 inches wide. I’m planning an “L” shaped corner for the cabinets along with this cherry counter top. What is the best way to accurately cut 45 degree miters in the ends of my 18 inch plank? It needs to be a tight, accurate miter so as to minimize seam visibility in the counter top. I Bought a set of these to pull the joint tight. https://www.rockler.com/tite-joint-fastener

Thanks!


6 replies so far

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Bob5103

138 posts in 1256 days


#1 posted 12-12-2018 05:43 PM

For me trying to cut a counter top to a “perfect” miter is one of the more miserable jobs in life. Having to deal with walls that are out of square, set up for the miter cut etc.. just makes me irritated. Creating a mason’s miter with a jig makes it easy. This is the one I use: https://www.amazon.com/Trend-COMBI66-Kitchen-Countertop-Jig/dp/B001UQ5PBW/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1544636010&sr=8-5&keywords=trend+jig
The jig even has the templates for cutting the recesses for the tite-joint fasteners.
It wont make an invisible joint but its not bad looking either. Here is a close up of one I did for our last house. The counter is 1 3/4” maple butcher block.

There are several online videos showing how to use the jig.

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1908 days


#2 posted 12-12-2018 05:47 PM

I’d probably cut one side with a reliable straightedge and skilsaw. scribe the other side and trim to fit.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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LesB

2131 posts in 3865 days


#3 posted 12-12-2018 06:20 PM

That hardware will work to pull the joint tight and using biscuits or splines in the joint would help keep the two sections aligned.

I can think of several ways to work on this. Not knowing what tools you have or your skill level, laying out the lines for the cut and carefully cutting with a circular skill saw and a straight edge guide is the most basic. Remember the saw cuts upward and could splinter the top surface so make the cut from the bottom side and use the appropriate blade for smooth cuts. Any miss match of the two edges would have to be corrected with a hand plane.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Lee

135 posts in 1300 days


#4 posted 12-12-2018 11:48 PM

The Fridge has the easiest way IMHO, it’s worked for me a few times with decent results. Cut a 45 in the end of one piece with straight edge, put tape down on the cut line and make a shallow scoring cut about 1/8” deep, then full cut. Then cut the other piece to fit square on both ends. put the first piece over the top of the second, pushing both pieces into the wall and the corner, put tape down on the second piece at the cut line, use the 45 on the first piece as a scribe and mark the second cut, do a shallow score cut, then full cut. now you have a perfect match for the probably out of square corner.

-- Colombia Custom Woodworking

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dfox52

29 posts in 2116 days


#5 posted 12-13-2018 10:55 AM

Thanks everyone! Great ideas! I’ll post pictures when finished.

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maxyedor

24 posts in 747 days


#6 posted 12-19-2018 10:58 PM

Grab a big, reasonably high quality speed square, and use that to set a fence or a DIY track for your circular saw, make the cuts. Once they’re cut, test-fit and if required, tune up the fit with either a block-plane or a sander, but the block plane will be far easier.

I’ve done a few this way and it’s really fast and really easy to get a perfect glue joint.

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