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Forum topic by CEY posted 12-12-2018 01:43 AM 507 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CEY

11 posts in 810 days


12-12-2018 01:43 AM

I’m just getting into the woodworking hobby after retiring from DOD. I’ve been building up my shop equipment using some used items, along with new as I can afford them…. now to my question,

I got a really good deal on an older Craftsman Radial Arm Saw. FREE! The problem is the motor… once I flip the switch the motor starts rotating, but very slowly and with no power, then after several seconds, there is an audible click, and the speed comes up to full RPM’s and at full power… only then can I cut any wood.

Does that sound like a bad start capacitor? This week I plan on pulling the motor, and tearing it down, maybe it just needs a good cleaning and lub job???

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

-- CEY Boulder City NV


9 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

743 posts in 1523 days


#1 posted 12-12-2018 02:21 AM

I’m not a motor expert, but the first thing I would try is to blow out all the sawdust if you have compressed air. Also, maybe check all the connections in the junction box on the motor as well and check the power cord for a break that may be making intermittent contact. Hopefully, someone with better info will chime in.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5552 posts in 1405 days


#2 posted 12-12-2018 03:22 PM

pm LJ (MR UNIX) he’s very knowledgeable about this kind of stuff.ive got a craftsman ros but have no idea whats causing your problem,but he might.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6225 posts in 1133 days


#3 posted 12-12-2018 03:43 PM

I take it you are running the proper volts my saw was 220v :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5210 posts in 4381 days


#4 posted 12-12-2018 03:52 PM

The C’man RAS that I had did not have a capacitor (at least none that I could ever find). I think it was a repulsion/induction motor. Was an Emerson-built saw I bought in 1978. Sold it just 6 years ago for almost what I paid.
Good idea to blow it out well, and check for any stiffness in the bearings.
Mine was a good saw once set properly.
The RAS takes a lot of bad raps, but mine sure did a lot of work for me.
They do need good blades.

-- [email protected]

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5592 posts in 2914 days


#5 posted 12-12-2018 05:47 PM

Some of those Craftsman saws actually had universal motors, the parts list for some models list brushes. Not all of them, but several models.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2129 posts in 3864 days


#6 posted 12-12-2018 06:04 PM

I have been using my Craftsman saw since 1968 (they built them a little better back then….more cast iron) and the only problem I have ever had was the bearings on the motor which were easily replaced. At first i did everything on it. cross cut, rip, molding head shaping, planing and including using it as a horizontal drill press. For the last 25 years it has just been a cross cut saw.
I would clean it well and check those bearings. Also there is an overload button on the motor that might be faulty.

Shortcomings I would cite is, underpowered, and if you make any temporary changes to the saws cutting angle you have to re-square it when you return for accurate 90 degree cross cuts.

-- Les B, Oregon

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MrUnix

7407 posts in 2620 days


#7 posted 12-12-2018 06:12 PM

There were several different motors used for those over the years, so it’s hard to tell without knowing what you have. It sounds like a sticking blade brake though, which some of them did have IIRC. Only way to figure it out is to open it up and look… give it a good cleaning and check the capacitor (if present) and bearings while you have it open. Here is what one typically looks like taken out of it’s cover showing the capacitor location:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View pottz's profile

pottz

5552 posts in 1405 days


#8 posted 12-12-2018 06:14 PM


if you make any temporary changes to the saws cutting angle you have to re-square it when you return for accurate 90 degree cross cuts.

- LesB


yeah thats why i only use mine for doing 90 degree cuts all angle cuts i do on the miter saw.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 418 days


#9 posted 12-12-2018 06:30 PM

RAS’s scare the daylights out of me because any kickback is coming your way real fast. Be careful dude! That being said, it is a very useful and versatile tool. I believe some of the old Crafstman saws have a router collet on the reverse side of the motor

Any parts you may need can probably still be found on-line. There are several websites that someone on this site can suggest.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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