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Epoxy vs liquid nails/no more nails

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Forum topic by Jimothy posted 12-11-2018 12:33 AM 2070 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jimothy

33 posts in 1359 days


12-11-2018 12:33 AM

So as far as I understand they have similar properties. Can bond non similar materials like metal to wood for example, can fill gaps, longer open time than pva. But epoxy is much more expensive. An I missing something? Seems alot easier to squeeze liquid nails out of a tube than to mix epoxy


17 replies so far

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corelz125

752 posts in 1396 days


#1 posted 12-11-2018 12:42 AM

One advantage for epoxy it’s better for detailed work. Liquid nails could get messy.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

737 posts in 1522 days


#2 posted 12-11-2018 01:24 AM

In my experience, epoxy has worked for me better than liquid nails. I don’t even think of them as interchangeable. I’ve had failures with liquid nails. Never with epoxy unless I screwed up the mix or something like that. If I want/need something in a caulking gun tube, I go to Loctite PL Premium.

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jonah

2075 posts in 3718 days


#3 posted 12-11-2018 01:51 AM

Liquid nails is a polyurethane-based adhesive. It has completely different properties than epoxy, which is a resin-based adhesive.

They each have their uses.

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shipwright

8320 posts in 3217 days


#4 posted 12-11-2018 03:41 AM

Apples and oranges.
Epoxies are high quality versatile adhesives capable of massive holding power over long periods under extreme conditions.

Liquid nails is a construction adhesive.

I wouldn’t go to sea in a boat held together with liquid nails.

I don’t mean to be rude here but there is a huge difference.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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therealSteveN

3101 posts in 994 days


#5 posted 12-11-2018 04:11 AM

New kid on the block for construction bonding agent.

“This 100% waterproof, low odor formula is designed for both interior and exterior projects, and is water, frost and heat resistant from temperatures of 0-120°F. It is solvent free, has a quick cure time, and can even be used on damp or wet surfaces. Initial Grab So Powerful It Quickly Holds Heavy Items – Even On Vertical Surfaces”

Guys are using it to direct bond pink foam board to concrete, or block basement walls, no studs needed, then another layer with electrical, and plumbing chases cut into it, then drywall directly to the foam. Passes code without a second look. If Granny can lift a piece of foam board, and cut it, she can do her own basement flip.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#6 posted 12-11-2018 04:58 AM

I don’t think of epoxy so much as an adhesive as a mechanical bonding agent. Take something like E6000 and put it on pretty much any surface and it’s stuck. Put epoxy on smooth steel, glass, etc, and it pops right off. But when it’s got something to grip to, epoxy holds fast.

Am I off base?

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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shipwright

8320 posts in 3217 days


#7 posted 12-11-2018 02:51 PM



I don t think of epoxy so much as an adhesive as a mechanical bonding agent. Take something like E6000 and put it on pretty much any surface and it s stuck. Put epoxy on smooth steel, glass, etc, and it pops right off. But when it s got something to grip to, epoxy holds fast.

Am I off base?

- Rich


I believe you are Rich. Have a look at this article.
Construction adhesives and epoxies are so different that they should hardly be spoken of in the same sentence (IMHO). They both have their place but very different.

....... I have used a lot of epoxy in my time building boats.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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RobHannon

276 posts in 950 days


#8 posted 12-11-2018 03:03 PM

If you are going to just base it on sticking one thing to another, construction adhesive is probably the best choice in situations where it will work. The difference is there are tons of things Epoxy is good for and construction adhesives would not even remotely work for. Like others have said Epoxy is a resin and poly construction adhesive is just an adhesive.

What are you trying to bond?

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ArtMann

1396 posts in 1235 days


#9 posted 12-11-2018 03:11 PM

I couldn’t imagine trying to edge glue two planks together with construction adhesive. The thick goo would leave an ugly crack.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

452 posts in 1498 days


#10 posted 12-11-2018 03:26 PM



One advantage for epoxy it s better for detailed work. Liquid nails could get messy.

- corelz125


In wood turning epoxy is the perfect vehicle to carry either wood dust, shavings or color pigment into a void because it does not add a color of it’s own. I can’t speak either way for construction work or basement conversions.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Jimothy's profile

Jimothy

33 posts in 1359 days


#11 posted 06-21-2019 01:16 AM

Hey guys bringing back an old threat here. In terms of having a sloppy joint that nobody would see, is one really better than the other for filling the gap due to my sloppy joinery? Keep in mind the Aesthetics are irrelevant in this example.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1420 posts in 3180 days


#12 posted 06-21-2019 01:28 AM

Here we go again!

If this is a wood to wood bond, the adhesive bonding strength needs to be no stronger than the bond strength of the wood fibers themselves as the wood will break before the joint. Think about it!!! The use of epoxy on a wood to wood bond is overkill and a waste of money. And if your joint is so bad that it needs massive filling, you need to re-do the joint properly. Most wood glues are formulated to have a bonding strength stronger than the wood.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

680 posts in 3213 days


#13 posted 06-21-2019 03:07 AM

Most liquid nails type is filler, some type of clay base I believe.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5552 posts in 1404 days


#14 posted 06-21-2019 05:21 PM



Here we go again!

If this is a wood to wood bond, the adhesive bonding strength needs to be no stronger than the bond strength of the wood fibers themselves as the wood will break before the joint. Think about it!!! The use of epoxy on a wood to wood bond is overkill and a waste of money. And if your joint is so bad that it needs massive filling, you need to re-do the joint properly. Most wood glues are formulated to have a bonding strength stronger than the wood.

- Planeman40


ditto,if it’s that bad it’s gonna most likely fail.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Jimothy's profile

Jimothy

33 posts in 1359 days


#15 posted 06-22-2019 12:47 AM

The miters did not hold at all! For some reason the no more nails didnt bond at all even though the joints were completely filled with the adhesive. I let it dry for 3 days..i was able to pull the miters apart with my fingers and basically pull the layer of glue off with my finger effortlessly, didnt seem to bond at all. It was a spruce frame i was painting heavily so didnt care as long as it wouldnt fall apart. The gaps were about 1/8th inch at their biggest point. I had used a belt sander to flatten out the surface..is it possiblr the heat generated messed up the glues integrity? Really not sure. Personally ive had good experiences with no more nails until now

Any ideas?

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