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Forum topic by Mcpowell posted 12-04-2018 07:31 PM 1094 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mcpowell

60 posts in 1340 days


12-04-2018 07:31 PM

These 2 boards have been re-sawed from a 4” x 4” x 36” piece. I believe these are 2 different types of wood. The one on the right has the weight/heft of red oak, but I’m not sure that is what it is.

The piece on the left is less dense, and I do not know what it is.

I have an almost unlimited supply of these boards. The 4×4’s arrive at a nearby company as runner’s for steel coil (they are placed under the flat coil so the forks of a forklift have space to pick up the coil).

I want to make 3 “Big Green Egg” type tables that will sit outside, on a deck, but will be under an overhang.

What type of wood are these boards?

And will that wood work okay for BGE tables?

Thanks in advance,
Mark

-- I want to be good


22 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10276 posts in 1589 days


#1 posted 12-04-2018 08:12 PM

The one on the right looks like Oak to me for sure. Can’t tell if it’s red or white though. White Oak is excellent for outdoor applications. Red, is not. Can’t tell at all about the one on the left. Maybe Maple? Need some closer pics showing grain and pics of end grain on both pieces to help you nail it down.

After re-reading, you say it will be under an overhang. So I assume not directly exposed to rain? If that’s the case, finish is more important than the type of wood.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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therealSteveN

3378 posts in 1025 days


#2 posted 12-04-2018 08:19 PM

I’d call the other one pine. If the one on the right is Red Oak, neither of them would be very good outdoor woods, unless they were completely and permanently covered in paint.

The areas most problematic will be the end grain, where moisture will wick up into the boards at ground contact. Some folks have pretty good luck preventing this by using something to either cap off, or raise up the leg so it’s not down where it is wet. Being under a covered porch can greatly increase life expectancy as well.

My list of woods where I don’t give a lot of thought to constant repainting, or covering with some form of coating to keep them from rotting, and just falling apart is:

Acacia
Black Locust
Cedar
Cypress
Douglas-Fir
Ipe
Redwood
Teak
White Oak

All WILL weather, and to keep them looking bright, and in some folks opinion CLEAN, you need to do some application of a product to retard that accumulation of mold, dirt, and whatever, to do so. Depending on which species you choose it could be as much work as painting the pine. For something like your BGE tables I would tend to favor Cedar, simply because it’s widely available, has the lowest normal price point, and if it isn’t expected to move (as in a chair, where it flexes a lot when you lean back) it will last a long time. On moving pieces cedar can/will yaw out where you have placed through bolts, and other fixtures of assembly. This can shorten it’s life a bit. Most of the harder woods won’t yaw out like cedar can.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Mcpowell

60 posts in 1340 days


#3 posted 12-04-2018 08:25 PM

Didn’t think about providing end grain pics, so here you go:

The tables would be under an overhang, but would still likely get wet from rain, if not directly then via blowing rain. However, the bottoms of the tables will have casters, so nothing will be touching the floor. I don’t think any of them would be exposed to much direct sun.

I don’t mind passing on the free material if it’s not worth the trouble to build. But since I’m building one for me and one for a couple of friends, “free” would be really nice.

-- I want to be good

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10276 posts in 1589 days


#4 posted 12-04-2018 08:36 PM

One on the left could be Poplar. The right does look like Red Oak to me. Like Steven said, they’ll work fine if you paint them. Otherwise I’d skip them and go with Cedar or White Oak. Both are pretty commonly available in most locations.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

996 posts in 3533 days


#5 posted 12-05-2018 12:04 AM

Poplar and White Oak

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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pottz

5766 posts in 1435 days


#6 posted 12-05-2018 12:13 AM



One on the left could be Poplar. The right does look like Red Oak to me. Like Steven said, they ll work fine if you paint them. Otherwise I d skip them and go with Cedar or White Oak. Both are pretty commonly available in most locations.

- HokieKen


+1

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1936 days


#7 posted 12-05-2018 02:28 AM

Poplar. White oak. Alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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000

2859 posts in 1350 days


#8 posted 12-05-2018 02:53 AM

I agree with the others that were right.
Poplar and White Oak

If you stare at them for 60 seconds they merge into each other and then look like Alder.

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

60 posts in 1340 days


#9 posted 12-05-2018 03:08 AM

Okay, I’m trying not to get too excited about the votes for white oak, but I’m also starting to agree with those thoughts.

I just read an article here: https://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/distinguishing-red-oak-from-white-oak/

I don’t have a 10X magnifier, but I do have a 30X and when I look at the endgrain under magnification it more closely matches the white oak description of clogged pores (tyloses). I wish I could get a magnified picture for you. I’ll try to think of a way to get one tomorrow.

-- I want to be good

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1936 days


#10 posted 12-05-2018 03:13 AM



I agree with the others that were right.
Poplar and White Oak

If you stare at them for 60 seconds they merge into each other and then look like Alder.

- jbay

That got a belly laugh

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10276 posts in 1589 days


#11 posted 12-05-2018 12:47 PM

Like I said, it’s definitely White Oak, not red ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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WDHLT15

1819 posts in 2926 days


#12 posted 12-05-2018 01:43 PM

I am with Tony on the poplar and white oak.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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firefighterontheside

20444 posts in 2307 days


#13 posted 12-05-2018 01:54 PM

Those 2 pieces are poplar and white oak. The next two may be red oak and walnut or some other combination. You’ll have closely ID each piece to make sure you make your whole project out of the same wood. I would think you want to do the whole thing out of white oak.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Mcpowell

60 posts in 1340 days


#14 posted 12-05-2018 03:28 PM

Okay, so now I’m having a bit of fun with this. And I think I’ve gotten a good enough picture for all to confirm. By the way, your iPhone has a “magnifier” setting which is really there so those of us that need to read a menu with small font can manage. But it also works as a magnifier of end grain and then you can take a screenshot of it and post it to your buddies on lumberjocks.

-- I want to be good

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10276 posts in 1589 days


#15 posted 12-05-2018 03:41 PM

Nice. Looks like White Oak to me. Although to be perfectly honest, even with magnified end grain, I still have a hard time distinguishing between red and white oak.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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