LumberJocks

Tell me this is a bad idea - shortening too long router bit

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by WorksInTheory posted 12-03-2018 07:28 PM 1061 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View WorksInTheory's profile

WorksInTheory

177 posts in 2023 days


12-03-2018 07:28 PM

Hi,

Getting into upgrading my bits to solid carbide. I bought a 1/2” solid carbide router bit that was 4” overall, thinking wanted to maximize flexibility with total cut length. But… of course, ran into an issue. The bit is too long for all my routers. In my Triton under the table fully extended below table, the bit sticks above the table 1/4”. Might not be a problem as I typically will not do plunge operations on a table.

My other router is a Bosch 1617 and I haven’t tried officially but from the manual it’s too long as well.

So… was thinking of cutting/griding off a little bit off the end. Couldn’t return it or exchange as I bought it online and would have to pay shipping back and shipping ont he exchange, etc.

What am I not considering?

Thanks.


20 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2730 posts in 1643 days


#1 posted 12-03-2018 07:39 PM

You can cut it off (at the collet end) if you leave enough material to still get a good grip on the shaft and actually have a way to cut carbide cleanly. Using a diamond cut off disc comes to mind, but keep the metal cool if you use some kind of abrasive cutter.

View WorksInTheory's profile

WorksInTheory

177 posts in 2023 days


#2 posted 12-03-2018 07:45 PM

i was going to use a grinder w/ cut off disc. My other options would be jig saw with metal cutting blade.


You can cut it off (at the collet end) if you leave enough material to still get a good grip on the shaft and actually have a way to cut carbide cleanly. Using a diamond cut off disc comes to mind, but keep the metal cool if you use some kind of abrasive cutter.

- splintergroup


View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2730 posts in 1643 days


#3 posted 12-03-2018 07:50 PM

The grinder/CO disk should work, but the disk is also carbide so cutting may go slow depending on which object is softer. Have a cup of water handy to quench as you would when using a grinder to sharpen a chisel.

View WorksInTheory's profile

WorksInTheory

177 posts in 2023 days


#4 posted 12-03-2018 08:20 PM

Haha at first I read this as a cup of water so I can take a break and take a drink… then I was really going to say a beer would be better. But then again shouldn’t operate dangerous equipment while drinking.


The grinder/CO disk should work, but the disk is also carbide so cutting may go slow depending on which object is softer. Have a cup of water handy to quench as you would when using a grinder to sharpen a chisel.

- splintergroup


View Jeff's profile

Jeff

507 posts in 3615 days


#5 posted 12-03-2018 08:37 PM

Probably the best option is to buy another bit. This sounds like a straight cutting bit, right? Not too expensive even in carbide. I don’t think I have any other bit with a profile that’s got a solid carbide shaft.

View DS's profile

DS

3197 posts in 2841 days


#6 posted 12-03-2018 08:41 PM

If you use a regular tool/blade sharpening service they can usually shorten a router bit without much debate.
Most major metro areas have 3 or 4 companies in town that do this cheaply. (And accurately)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

1190 posts in 326 days


#7 posted 12-03-2018 09:00 PM



Probably the best option is to buy another bit. This sounds like a straight cutting bit, right? Not too expensive even in carbide. I don t think I have any other bit with a profile that s got a solid carbide shaft.

- Jeff

I’d probably do that too and use this as a card scraper burnisher. I’ve cut carbide with my HF cut off grinder, but I don’t think I would on something I wanted to retain the RC rating.

View WorksInTheory's profile

WorksInTheory

177 posts in 2023 days


#8 posted 12-03-2018 09:18 PM

What is an RC rating?

I guess $70 bucks could be considered not that expensive but rather spend that money on bits I don’t have like 3/8”, etc. But if it not cuttable or ruin the bit then I won’t.

BTW it says cutting length is 2-1/8” and so therefore the shank part is 1-7/8. If I take 1/4” off then I would have 1-3/8” left… is that enough length for safe collett clamping?

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1611 posts in 1828 days


#9 posted 12-03-2018 09:18 PM

What’s the cutting length? I might be interested in it

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9950 posts in 1559 days


#10 posted 12-03-2018 09:24 PM

You can cut it. Although a solid carbide shank is gonna eat up a grinder wheel. I use a diamond cutoff wheel in my dremel to cut carbide. But I don’t usually cut a 1/2” solid shank of it. If you have a machine shop or a tool and die shop nearby, they would probably shorten it for not much money provided they have the appropriate equipment.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

830 posts in 809 days


#11 posted 12-03-2018 10:30 PM

Lol… Sell it on eBay for $55 and buy the right one. If you muck up the cutting I’d hate to be around if it comes apart at 10-15,000 rpm.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1326 posts in 2373 days


#12 posted 12-04-2018 01:05 AM



Lol… Sell it on eBay for $55 and buy the right one. If you muck up the cutting I d hate to be around if it comes apart at 10-15,000 rpm.

- Bluenote38

Amen. This is not a big enough deal to go through all of the PITA you would need to make it fit your situation. Cut your losses and sell it or give it away. Cutting a solid carbide bit in the average home shop sounds like either an exercise in futility or a disaster waiting to happen. You could easily invest more in the cutting supplies than the cost of the bit. Paying someone with the gear and know how to do the job also sounds like an expense worth more than the original cost of the bit. Part ways with the bit, even if at enough of a loss to remember the lesson. You will be happy to see it go to a good home.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3106 posts in 995 days


#13 posted 12-04-2018 01:23 AM


If you muck up the cutting I d hate to be around if it comes apart at 10-15,000 rpm.

- Bluenote38

Seeing as how there isn’t a “how to” on doing this, “muck up” may be a certainty. Do they sell Kevlar underwear for woodworkers? Kevlar, and bulletproof glass headgear?

Seriously I have been zinged a number of times with carbide teeth off of TS blades, good eye wear should be fine.

-- Think safe, be safe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2625 days


#14 posted 12-04-2018 04:38 AM

Thats a bad idea, read the sell it posts, and all the other warnings or call Grant and then act.
Next step go buy the correct size one.

Failing that fit a fat base on your router and use it “as is”
Solid carbide yes they exist I have a couple of 1/4 and 1/2” spiral bits, they are CMT from memory
The mass alone will tell you if its solid carbide, failing that use a magnet.

Howard Hughes of the Hughes Tool Company made his fortune many years ago with complex solid carbide cutters called tricone and they offered a service resharpening them, maybe you could contact them, you can still buy them today, I think they trade as Baker Hughes these days, I know for sure Howard is out of it.

Let me know if you if you need an upate on more useless trivia

-- Regards Rob

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2625 days


#15 posted 12-04-2018 04:49 AM

.

-- Regards Rob

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com