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Marking guage

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Forum topic by Oldschoolguy posted 11-29-2018 01:39 PM 564 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oldschoolguy

64 posts in 259 days


11-29-2018 01:39 PM

Good morning!!!!! How y’all doing this morning? Pretty chilly here at the moment in NC. Just out of curiosity, what is the big deal out of using a marking gauge? Do they improve your project layout lines or what? Just wondering. Are they more accurate than using a pencil and are those gauges with the fine adjustment wheel on them any better? Comments, suggestions, experiences all appreciated. Thanks to all.


7 replies so far

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bondogaposis

5457 posts in 2774 days


#1 posted 11-29-2018 02:12 PM

I prefer the wheel gauges over the other type. The advantage to using them is that they are more than just a thin line. They make the first cut of the joinery. For example when using them to lay out dovetails, it gives you a place to put the chisel when chopping out the waste. You find that cut line with the tip of the chisel, you can feel it. That is much more accurate than placing the chisel on a pencil line.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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HokieKen

9979 posts in 1561 days


#2 posted 11-29-2018 02:21 PM

What Bondo said^. The main advantage is that it actually scores a line in your work that can guide a chisel or saw to the right point by feel. It’s also a much finer line than a pencil can give. Take a dovetail joint that’s perfectly fit and thrown in some gaps that are the width of a pencil mark and the joint won’t fit or look nearly as nice.

That being said, they’re really not any big advantage when using power tools. If you’re using a fence or jig to guide your cut, the precision is in your setup moreso than in your layout. I still use them a lot anyway though simply because they’re easy to use. One-handed process is just simpler than supporting the work then dragging a square down the edge while holding a pencil against the end of the blade.

The cons are that the scribed lines can almost disappear into the grain in some woods making them hard to see vs a pencil line and sometimes you’ll have layout lines left on your work when your done.

Just my $.02

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Oldschoolguy

64 posts in 259 days


#3 posted 11-29-2018 02:51 PM

Hey Ken, I’m originally from Syracuse NY. I haven’t looked at the schedule yet. Are they meeting in basketball this year? Go Orange!!!!!!!

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HokieKen

9979 posts in 1561 days


#4 posted 11-29-2018 03:02 PM

Yep, on 1/26. Not a big basketball fan but we’re having a decent season so far. We need something after an atrocious football season!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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SMP

1201 posts in 328 days


#5 posted 11-30-2018 05:57 PM


I prefer the wheel gauges over the other type. The advantage to using them is that they are more than just a thin line. They make the first cut of the joinery. For example when using them to lay out dovetails, it gives you a place to put the chisel when chopping out the waste. You find that cut line with the tip of the chisel, you can feel it. That is much more accurate than placing the chisel on a pencil line.

- bondogaposis

Totally agree here. My first few attempts at dovetails were all over the place with pencil marks that walked. Especially in wood with open grain, the pencil kind of jumps around, even pin type gauges can. And going with the grain the pencil wants to follow a”rut” kind of like when mountain biking in rutted out fire roads. I bought the wheel type gauge with micro adjust, and WOW night and day difference on my dovetails, etc. The wheel cuts a “knife wall” into the wood. What I find the micro adjust to really help with is finding center of stock, I can eyeball it, check and then micro-adjust it really quickly. ANd the wheel type with the cutter on outer edge is nice for dovetails as you can just pull the wheel tight against your stock and its automatically set perfect for the stock to mark the depth of the other piece.

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MrRon

5576 posts in 3666 days


#6 posted 12-01-2018 05:05 PM

Check out the thread about “How to use a marking gauge”, posted on Oct, 6 2018.

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WoodenDreams

626 posts in 333 days


#7 posted 12-01-2018 09:53 PM

I prefer the wheel gauge over the pin point gauge, They both have their place for precision. I tend to use a ink pen when marking my lay out over a pencil. The ink marks are easier to see then the pencil mark, and sands away as the pencil does.

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