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Forum topic by Cuddy8 posted 11-28-2018 09:06 PM 530 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cuddy8

2 posts in 143 days


11-28-2018 09:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finish polyurethane problem help pine spruce streaks grain

I am currently finishing a small kitchen Island for my mom. I am finishing edge glued spruce and I keep running into a situation when applying any type of polyurethane finish. This time I am using Varathane semi gloss polyurethane finish applied with a foam brush. I am getting good level application, but I notice streaks in the finish that look like the poly is not even sticking to the wood. It seems as though the wood is soaking up the poly at different portions of the grain. Can someone point me in the right direction here? Thanks


7 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

514 posts in 948 days


#1 posted 11-28-2018 10:44 PM

Wood does soak at different rates. Add a few more coats and it should even out eventually.

-- Sawdust Maker

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17865 posts in 3334 days


#2 posted 11-28-2018 11:24 PM

Yup ^

Keep layin it on there.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2244 posts in 3272 days


#3 posted 11-30-2018 04:42 PM

Ditto all the above. I thin my initial coats so they will do that intentionally and keep adding at knots and other places that soak it in. As long as I keep it wet, I can keep adding to those spots. Then I let it harden and work the finish until I’ve built up enough coats to sand (e.g., 600 and water or oil) and polish (e.g., using a Porter Cable ROS-Polisher and microfiber cloths on a hook and loop pad dabbed with swirl mark remover or auto paint).

When done, no one knows if the project was brushed or shot.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2047 posts in 3771 days


#4 posted 11-30-2018 06:14 PM

More coats of finish, sanding lightly between then is one way. Then when it has cured (about 3 days) you can lightly sand with 400 or 600 sandpaper to remove any fine dust bumps. I like to apply a paste was with white 3M pad and buff.
Applying it with a sponge brush may leave bubbles as will brushing or working the wet surface too much. Be generous with the application and try not to work with water base when the ambient temperature is over 75….65-70 works best for me. When it is warm and or low humidity the water base finishes start to cure before they level out.

On porous woods I often pre-coat it with a coat or two of de-waxed shellac in a 2# cut to seal the wood. Shellac drys in a very short time (at 70 degrees about 30 minutes) so it speeds up the overall time. It is easy to apply it with a clean soft piece of cotton cloth….wear gloves to keep it off your hands. If you use a brush clean it with household ammonia and warm water. Zinsser’s Sealcoat is one source of a de-waxed shellac that works well. Note: it must be de-waxed or the poly top coat may not adhere well.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Cuddy8

2 posts in 143 days


#5 posted 12-02-2018 03:05 PM

Everyone, I appreciate the feedback and the knowledge. Thank you very much. Not quite there yet, but it’s getting better with the more coats I add.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30289 posts in 2666 days


#6 posted 12-02-2018 03:10 PM

Contact Charles Neil, he’s a member here and specializes in finishing problems.

[email protected]

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30289 posts in 2666 days


#7 posted 12-02-2018 05:03 PM

Oops, double post

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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