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Forum topic by Patrickgeddes14 posted 11-28-2018 01:28 PM 786 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Patrickgeddes14

146 posts in 234 days


11-28-2018 01:28 PM

So ive learned you just can’t trust off brands no matter what the price is. First attempt to use this thing….turn on and it doesn’t spin. I get it started by spinning with my hand, then it starts to spin on it’s own…then it starts going extremely bfast. So I start chiseling just to experiment and it slows down at very little pressure from me. It’s a dedicated 240 circuit so def problem with the amount of electricity. My guess is I’m fucked but maybe y’all know something I dont


18 replies so far

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#1 posted 11-28-2018 01:50 PM

Can you change belt location? Sounds like you might be on the high speed/low torque range. Your probably screwed if not…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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JayT

6226 posts in 2630 days


#2 posted 11-28-2018 02:05 PM

Is the motor wired correctly? Some of those motors are dual voltage and have to be wired right for the current. If you post some pics of the motor plate and wiring, someone may be able to help diagnose if that is the culprit.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Patrickgeddes14

146 posts in 234 days


#3 posted 11-28-2018 03:56 PM

Couldn’t get pic of motor

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#4 posted 11-28-2018 04:04 PM

Move that belt to the other end. Smallest diameter on the motor and largest diameter on the spindle. That should help with the stalling issue. What are you using to test with? In other words how big is whatever you have mounted?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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GrantA

1603 posts in 1826 days


#5 posted 11-28-2018 04:08 PM

You mentioned it’s a dedicated 240v circuit but I’ll bet a dollar that bench top lathe is a 110v machine all day long. Are you sure you’re feeding it the right juice?

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Phil32

579 posts in 322 days


#6 posted 11-28-2018 04:12 PM

I have a HF lathe just like that. It’s 110V and works fine.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#7 posted 11-28-2018 04:15 PM

If that’s the HF lathe, then it should work well. That lathe has a good reputation as a solid machine.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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waho6o9

8673 posts in 2995 days


#8 posted 11-28-2018 04:23 PM

Adjust the belt.

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ScottM

737 posts in 2565 days


#9 posted 11-28-2018 04:43 PM



Adjust the belt.

- waho6o9

Just about to suggest that. Have seen others have motor start up issues because the belt was too tight…

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sepeck

402 posts in 2560 days


#10 posted 11-28-2018 04:47 PM

If it’s a Harbor Freight one, there are a few YouTube videos on tuning them up.

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

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Underdog

1353 posts in 2454 days


#11 posted 11-28-2018 05:14 PM

I don’t think they even sell that lathe anymore.
That’s the one with the stamped square tubing for bed ways? And the bent sheet metal base?
I started with one just about like it.

I don’t think it’s 220V. It’s gotta be your voltage.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#12 posted 11-28-2018 05:27 PM

I don t think it s 220V. It s gotta be your voltage.
- Underdog

Well… if it’s wired for 120v and being run on a 240v line, it will fry. However, if it’s wired for 240v and being run on 120v, it will exhibit the symptoms described. I’d start by checking to make sure that it’s getting 240v. I’ve seen more than once where one leg of a 240v circuit was bad.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Underdog

1353 posts in 2454 days


#13 posted 11-28-2018 05:30 PM

Here’s a review of the lathe on LJ.
http://lumberjocks.com/davidmicraig/blog/20993
I’m in agreement with his assessment. Since I was given mine as well, it was worth the price.
But I wouldn’t pay money for one. I’d spend a few more bucks to get solid cast iron, and some standard tapers/spindles/banjos/locking handles.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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Underdog

1353 posts in 2454 days


#14 posted 11-28-2018 05:33 PM



I don t think it s 220V. It s gotta be your voltage.
- Underdog

Well… if it s wired for 120v and being run on a 240v line, it will fry. However, if it s wired for 240v and being run on 120v, it will exhibit the symptoms described. I d start by checking to make sure that it s getting 240v. I ve seen more than once where one leg of a 240v circuit was bad.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

My thought was that the start/run capacitor could be fried. That would account for slow starts and no power. Does that thing even have a capacitor is the question.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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Woodknack

12842 posts in 2799 days


#15 posted 11-28-2018 05:56 PM

Send it back. If you have to repair it out of the box might as well buy a vintage lathe and repair it, that way you’ll have something.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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