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Forum topic by Blackfin29 posted 11-25-2018 09:52 PM 1076 views 0 times favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackfin29

98 posts in 589 days


11-25-2018 09:52 PM

I have a conundrum. Every tool I buy I typically think somewhere in the back of my little brain that one day this tool may be passed down to my Grandchildren, or definitely Children. So I typically try to stay mid-upper tier in hopes they may last.
This reason, and a few others, I have been very hesitant to dive headfirst into the cordless realm. Don’t get me wrong I have all the basics, and my choice has been Dewalt or Makita simply because I’m vested into those brands and it becomes a battery issue frankly.

My 2nd concern is how long will these things last? I can’t help but view them as disposable. Am I alone in this?

By the way, I’m incredibly impressed with what’s out there today, so it makes me want to start transitioning over to all cordless stuff.

For example, what’s NEXT for Dewalt? They had the 18v, now the 20volt and even the flex series.

Excuse my electrical ignorance but is 22volt lurking around the dam corner?


44 replies so far

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Rich

4565 posts in 1010 days


#1 posted 11-25-2018 10:43 PM

I’m with you. I have cordless drills and impact drivers in both 12V and 18V. That’s it. Everything else is corded.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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jutsFL

172 posts in 262 days


#2 posted 11-25-2018 10:58 PM

I will second the feeling. I always feel like the battery tools are, well, only as good as the battery. Once that dies – or is discontinued secondary to the products age… Then said tool is a paper weight!

Pretty sure my corded skill saw will be kicking in 20yrs. Highly doubt an outdated battery line will still be available for a Makita saw 20 yrs on.

Just a thought. I do own MANY cordless tools, that I absolutely love… Suppose their time is limited :)

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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josephf

216 posts in 2517 days


#3 posted 11-25-2018 11:04 PM

well ,i have something to add that has been weighing in on my purchases .
the tech is changing so so fast that what ever you get is antique ,old school in a few years time .
look at cordless drills ,milwaukee just up the program with there line-up this year[2800 series of tools] .now everyone will be playing catch-up .makita[or who ever] will then bring out some new tech that will out do milwaukee .it will be smaller more powerful etc .

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syenefarmer

529 posts in 3501 days


#4 posted 11-25-2018 11:14 PM

I wouldn’t be overly concerned about passing down your tools. When that time does come what you buy today will be outdated and old technology anyways. Your children and grandchildren will undoubtedly keep and cherish your tools and maybe even use some of them but probably will really want what is current at that time. Buy those tools that you want to use yourself today and tomorrow will take care of itself.

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WoodenDreams

623 posts in 331 days


#5 posted 11-25-2018 11:42 PM

All of my hand held power tools are corded, (3/8” & 1/2” drills, biscuit cutter, power planer, jig saws, circular saws, grinders, buffers, belt sanders, etc.). Except I do have a 18v 1/2” drill & a small 3.8v screw driver. I’ve already replaced four 18v batteries & ready to replace another 18v battery for not holding a charge. The old style battery is harder and harder to find & you don’t know how long it’s been sitting on the store shelf. That will be 5 batteries in 10 years, and my two corded drills are 20 years old, and not had to replace any cords yet. ANY BATTERY OPERATED POWER HAND TOOL, I consider a throw away or disposable tool. Because you have to replace the batteries every couple years, and when the brand updates or so-called improves the power tool, a different battery version is introduced, making your current tool obsolete. The only battery tool I’d buy is a 1/2” drill, for a expensive convenience. One of my friends has a slew of DeWalt battery power tools. He keeps 6 batteries charged. now all his DeWalt power tools are obsolete, since they changed to 20v.

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PPBart

86 posts in 251 days


#6 posted 11-25-2018 11:51 PM



A.. now all his DeWalt power tools are obsolete, since they changed to 20v…

There is an adapter that supposedly lets you use 18v batteries on 20v tools, but it doesn’t seem very good. I had a Ryobi drill driver that died a couple of years ago, then I bought Dewalt. The only cordless tool I have is a drill, doubt I will go much beyond that.

-- PPBart

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Willscary

25 posts in 340 days


#7 posted 11-25-2018 11:57 PM

I purchased Ridgid X4 18v tools when they came out well over a decade ago. Lifetime warranty. Since then, I have added many more of the same brand…a jigsaw, a nail gun, a grinder, etc. the newest are the X5 brushless models. The batteries are interchangeable. I have had zero issues and use them a fair amount. None have failed.

Are they as strong as my Milwaukee corded tools from the 1990s? Nope. But they are one heck of a lot more convenient.

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runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2445 days


#8 posted 11-26-2018 12:59 AM

I have several Ryobi 18v. tools, mostly drills and drivers. The others are for the convenience of being cordless where AC is not handy, such as up a ladder. I have never had one of their lithium batteries give up the ghost, and I’ve got some that have to be 5 years old. But I don’t miss the nicads, and I was never impressed with the NMH batteries. I noticed their time in the sun was quite brief.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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olegrump

97 posts in 643 days


#9 posted 11-26-2018 01:11 AM

I’ll chime in here with an experience of my own. I own a DEWALT 12 volt cordless drill that I bought sometime around 1995. After a little over 20 years of use, I had to buy a pair of replacement batteries from an on line source. Charged them up, and they were rarin’ to go. Because I had second home for awhile, I also bought a B & D 14 volt. (Please note that Dewalt is owned by B&D) That damned thing crapped out after about 1 1/2- 2 years of only occasional use. I have since been given a B&D 18 volt, but you have to charge it through the handle, not with a battery charger. Does ok, but runs out of juice at inconvenient times. The Dewalt is my “go-to” cordless drill, I can tell you. As long as I can still get batteries in another 20 years, I’m good to go with my Dewalt.

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awsum55

560 posts in 929 days


#10 posted 11-26-2018 01:27 AM

I also have found the Ridgid brand to be the best bang for your buck. They not only warranty the tool for life, they also warranty the battery for life. The 18V drill is strong enough to break your wrist or snap a #8 screw if you don’t set the clutch. Very hard to stall the drill and the batteries charge pretty quick. They are well balanced and sit solidly on a table. I have one for the work shop and I use the other one with my sockets when I’m working on my cars.

-- John D, OP, KS

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jonah

2075 posts in 3719 days


#11 posted 11-26-2018 01:43 AM

No cordless tool is going to last anywhere near long enough to be passed down. Don’t bother worrying about that. Stationary machines maybe, and good corded tools will last a long time, but nothing battery powered is going to last. Best to just accept that, buy what’s useful for you, and move on.

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JCamp

986 posts in 971 days


#12 posted 11-26-2018 01:46 AM

I’ve used porter cable battery tools for over 10 years now. First 3-4 years was 18v then I switched over to the 20v when they came out. I highly recommend them. I got both my current sets the Saturday after Black Friday. I do a lot of work in the woods but I still use them a lot just around the house cause I hate fighting with cords. The saws aren’t good for cutting up big sheets of 3/4 plywood but I’ve used them almost exclusively on all the decks I’ve built and they have held up very well. I do also see them as a temporary tool. Eventually the batteries will give out and eventually in the course of things they will change design but I’ve worked their butts off and honestly they’ll probably be ready for a break when that time comes

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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pottz

5552 posts in 1405 days


#13 posted 11-26-2018 02:00 AM

wow were have you guys been,dewalt has 60 volt tools,like a table saw that uses 2 60v batteries for 120v.sliding compound saws,we are very close to the day cords will be a thing of the past.12v tools? what are those.as far as planning to hand down your cordless tools to your kids good luck,and grand kids,you can pretty much forget that.its gonna be good boys.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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Blackfin29

98 posts in 589 days


#14 posted 11-26-2018 02:10 AM



I wouldn t be overly concerned about passing down your tools. When that time does come what you buy today will be outdated and old technology anyways. Your children and grandchildren will undoubtedly keep and cherish your tools and maybe even use some of them but probably will really want what is current at that time. Buy those tools that you want to use yourself today and tomorrow will take care of itself.

- syenefarmer

Words of wisdom right there…

I’m glad I’m not alone..

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2829 days


#15 posted 11-26-2018 04:12 AM


I wouldn t be overly concerned about passing down your tools. When that time does come what you buy today will be outdated and old technology anyways. Your children and grandchildren will undoubtedly keep and cherish your tools and maybe even use some of them but probably will really want what is current at that time. Buy those tools that you want to use yourself today and tomorrow will take care of itself.

- syenefarmer

Words of wisdom right there…

I m glad I m not alone..

- Blackfin29

+1

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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