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Forum topic by fiddlebanshee posted 11-23-2018 10:54 PM 554 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3365 days


11-23-2018 10:54 PM

Hi guys,

We need more CD storage. We have several IKEA billy bookcases with CD inserts that divides every shelf in 8 cubbies for CDs.

To match this look I designed something similar, really simple. The construction is not the issue, my question is what to do with the exposed plywood edges. I’m thinking maple or maybe a good quality birch plywood for the case (3/4”) and similar 1/2” for the inserts.

I can see two options for the edges. What would be your preference. Keep in mind I am a beginning woodworker and do not have tons of experience.

Option 1. Cover with edgebanding laminate (iron on and trim edges) = I have these tools but have not used them yet, so don’t know how much I need to practice before this comes out fairly decent. It’s going to live in our living room, so don’t want to have to look at crummy edges all the time.

Option 2. Cover with thin strips of solid wood, either in same or contrasting color. I have a 18ga brad nailer but not a pinnailer. I suppose I would have to fill the holes that the brads leave, but then what? The idea is to finish this with some kind of clear finish, and not stain or paint. If you fill the holes, then sand and then put some poly over it, would you still see where the holes are patched? Would it be worth getting a compressor and pinnailer?

Eventually I need to build three of these for the overflow of our CDs.

-- As if I needed another hobby!


14 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12842 posts in 2799 days


#1 posted 11-23-2018 10:59 PM

I prefer solid wood edging. Somewhere recently I saw a nice tip on making edge banding clamps from spring clamps and an innertube.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Eric

79 posts in 293 days


#2 posted 11-23-2018 11:45 PM

Personal I like to use wood strips for the edge banding, and I use a 16 gauge nailer. As for filling the nail holes I use a minwax filler to match the stain or color of Wood after the first coat of poly. You can mix the colors to blend in well with the wood you are using.

-- Eric, Upstate South Carolina

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oldnovice

7487 posts in 3787 days


#3 posted 11-24-2018 01:58 AM

I have done both, iron on edge banding an glue on strips, for me it’s a toss up as they both work effectively.

I had a problem the iron on material when I built a cassette tape storage box. Do you even remember cassettes tapes?
The edge banding was not totally flush with the plywood and it caught, evetually tore, on the cassettes when they were removed.
I should either made sure all edges were totally flush or not make the openings as deep so the cassette would protrude from the case a small amount.

That was a long time ago, my daughter was teen and now one of her kids almost a teen.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Craftsman on the lake

2988 posts in 3857 days


#4 posted 11-24-2018 03:14 AM

CD’s? People still use CD’s?

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Scap

78 posts in 346 days


#5 posted 11-24-2018 03:44 AM



CD s? People still use CD s?

- Craftsman on the lake

Is that like stocks and bonds?

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3365 days


#6 posted 11-24-2018 01:11 PM


CD s? People still use CD s?

- Craftsman on the lake


Oh yes. The sound quality of mp3s is not comparable to CD quality recordings. My husband has very perceptive ears and we have probably about 3000 cds. Classical, traditional Irish music, jazz, and some other stuff.

We also have a couple second hand bookstores in the area that sell CDs for $4 a piece. So it’s a lot cheaper buying those than online mp3s even. I guess they have the selection they do because many people are actually getting rid of their CDs and that’s our luck!

-- As if I needed another hobby!

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3365 days


#7 posted 11-24-2018 01:16 PM

Ok, I think I am leaning to solid wood. So some follow up questions:

1. Do you apply the banding before or after assembly of the case?

2. How thick would the strip need to be? 1/2”? 3/4”? 1”?

3. I am assuming I’d cut them just proud of the width of the plywood and then trim flush with a router? Correct?

Thanks guys!

-- As if I needed another hobby!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2728 posts in 1642 days


#8 posted 11-24-2018 03:41 PM

I like the solid wood trim the best. These would look great with drawers (or doors), but with that many CD’s, the work could take years…

I’ve recently put my entire CD collection onto a Volumio hi-fi server running on a $35 raspberry pi, high bit rate and the audio files are stored with lossless compression so the sound quality is as good as the source CDs allow.

The great thing is the ability to index the music for fast searching by artist, title, etc. and my collection of several hundred CDs easily fits on a SD drive

There is room for almost 4000 CDs and expansion is easy. The only pain is loading all the disks onto the drive.

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Craftsman on the lake

2988 posts in 3857 days


#9 posted 11-24-2018 03:56 PM


CD s? People still use CD s?

- Craftsman on the lake

Oh yes. The sound quality of mp3s is not comparable to CD quality recordings. My husband has very perceptive ears and we have probably about 3000 cds. Classical, traditional Irish music, jazz, and some other stuff.

We also have a couple second hand bookstores in the area that sell CDs for $4 a piece. So it s a lot cheaper buying those than online mp3s even. I guess they have the selection they do because many people are actually getting rid of their CDs and that s our luck!

- fiddlebanshee

People still listen to Mp3’s? Really? AAC, flac, and a few other formats are far more advanced. mp3’s if I’m not mistaken are pretty much delegated to audiobooks now.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3365 days


#10 posted 11-24-2018 03:59 PM



I like the solid wood trim the best. These would look great with drawers (or doors), but with that many CD s, the work could take years…

I ve recently put my entire CD collection onto a Volumio hi-fi server running on a $35 raspberry pi, high bit rate and the audio files are stored with lossless compression so the sound quality is as good as the source CDs allow.

The great thing is the ability to index the music for fast searching by artist, title, etc. and my collection of several hundred CDs easily fits on a SD drive

There is room for almost 4000 CDs and expansion is easy. The only pain is loading all the disks onto the drive.

- splintergroup

The time commitment would be too great we already have over 3000 cds

-- As if I needed another hobby!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7487 posts in 3787 days


#11 posted 11-24-2018 06:25 PM

There is another way to cover the edges with solid wood.
Rabbit the shelf and a matching rabbit on the edging provides more glue area and a stronger joint.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3365 days


#12 posted 11-24-2018 11:36 PM


There is another way to cover the edges with solid wood.
Rabbit the shelf and a matching rabbit on the edging provides more glue area and a stronger joint.

- oldnovice


Yes, I’ve been perusing youtube and one of the ideas I got was to do a tongue in groove joint. In that case I don’t think I need pin nails, even. A rabbet would absolutely also work.

I’m thinking to make the edge actually quite a bit bigger, maybe about 1.5” x 3/4”. So if my shelves were 7” deep, they would now be 5.5” with a 1.5” edge. That way the edge would be mostly under the CDs and if there are imperfections they would not show. I could do the same with the sides, but that may look a bit funny.

I need to play a little on the computer to see how this looks.

-- As if I needed another hobby!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12842 posts in 2799 days


#13 posted 11-25-2018 03:24 AM

3000 CD’s sounds like a burden. (pun unintended) I stream everything. Type it in and listen, no shuffling or ripping cd’s, no worrying about codecs, none of the hassle.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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splintergroup

2728 posts in 1642 days


#14 posted 11-25-2018 03:23 PM

I agree on the time commitment, 3k CDs would take about 300+ hours, plenty of time to crank out some wood projects 8^)

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