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Forum topic by JerryLH posted 11-23-2018 04:16 PM 822 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JerryLH

160 posts in 1731 days


11-23-2018 04:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question mahogany finishing

Question please – (old question). Preferred wood filler? I have a mahogany dining table top I’ve glued up. I’ll likely use a satin or semi gloss poly as the eventual finish. I would like to end up with zero porosity. I’d greatly appreciate the benefit of your experience/knowledge. Regards

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok


17 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5210 posts in 4380 days


#1 posted 11-23-2018 04:29 PM

Look at vids on grain filling. Bunches out there, and the process is much better seen than read.

-- [email protected]

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Andybb

1932 posts in 1023 days


#2 posted 11-23-2018 07:05 PM


Look at vids on grain filling. Bunches out there, and the process is much better seen than read.

- Bill White


+1

Lots of options. For a large piece I would just try using a water based sanding sealer or a few coats of shellac. See how it works on the underside first.

Charles Neil - Grain filling mahogany. Chas is a member here.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

490 posts in 892 days


#3 posted 11-23-2018 11:10 PM

Not sure whether or not you would like to draw attention to the area that needs filled or not, but my suggestion would be to get some coffee grounds and CA glue. Blend the coffee grounds as fine as possible, and put a small amount of glue on top. Seal the grounds in with glue and the sand the grounds flush. I have found this to work well in my projects; hope it helps!
Heres a picture of the idea. The black in between the inlay is the coffee grounds.

http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictures/projects/1767753-438x.jpg

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

160 posts in 1731 days


#4 posted 11-23-2018 11:20 PM

Thanks for the feedback – not needing to fill defects – just wanting to fill the pores of the wood – not looking so much for how to – but rather some product names. Thanks again.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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Andybb

1932 posts in 1023 days


#5 posted 11-24-2018 12:24 AM


Thanks for the feedback – not needing to fill defects – just wanting to fill the pores of the wood – not looking so much for how to – but rather some product names. Thanks again.

- JerryLH

The Timbermate comes in different colors. It is a little more aggressive in that it can be mixed with water and actually fill the pours a little better. I used it on a table with mahogany veneer and it came out smooth as silk with 220 grit sandpaper. Should look nice with your oil based poly over it.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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robscastle

6223 posts in 2624 days


#6 posted 11-24-2018 07:10 AM

Timbermate in Alder…. OMG what will they think of next? ... and thats the shot for grain filling too!

-- Regards Rob

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#7 posted 11-24-2018 07:18 AM

I’ll likely use a satin or semi gloss poly as the eventual finish. I would like to end up with zero porosity.
[...]
not needing to fill defects – just wanting to fill the pores of the wood
- JerryLH

For your first coat (or possibly more depending on how big the pores are), wipe it on and rub it around with wet/dry sandpaper. The sandpaper will create a slurry of poly/sawdust that will fill the pores. Once filled, finish as usual.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

125 posts in 1468 days


#8 posted 11-24-2018 02:29 PM

Aqua Coat works very well on porous woods. 2-3 coats will provide a surface that you can coat with shellac and then whatever finish you choose.
Highly recommended.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View Robert's profile

Robert

3436 posts in 1900 days


#9 posted 11-24-2018 02:37 PM

Aqua Coat or Old Masters work well.

You will have to decide on clear or not.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

160 posts in 1731 days


#10 posted 11-27-2018 02:51 AM

Thanks much for the feedback.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6266 posts in 2685 days


#11 posted 11-27-2018 03:30 AM

I remember some one here describing how they used Danish oil and sanding dust to create a slurry for a filler. As I recall they were sanding red oak and using the red oak sanding dust. Perhaps it could work with your project.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1443 posts in 2530 days


#12 posted 11-27-2018 02:43 PM



I remember some one here describing how they used Danish oil and sanding dust to create a slurry for a filler. As I recall they were sanding red oak and using the red oak sanding dust. Perhaps it could work with your project.

- BurlyBob

I’ve done that in walnut with danish oil and 220 grit sandpaper. Worked for me. I was working on a very small surface though (walnut pen presentation box in my projects).

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

737 posts in 1522 days


#13 posted 11-27-2018 03:15 PM

You could use your final finish as a filler. This is an old time method that works very well, but requires lots of sanding. I used it on a mahogany table a few years ago and ended up with a glassy smooth finish. All you do is apply your finish to a properly prepared surface, let it dry, and then sand it back almost to the original surface. This will remove most of the finish, but leave finish in the pores. Add another coat and sand it back as before, Continue this process until all the pores are filled and then apply a couple of final coats. When you sand, use a flat sanding block. You can tell if the pores need more filling as they will show as tiny shinny spots. As you are sanding, if all the shiny spots are gone, then you are ready for the final coats. It is lots of work, but you will end up with a beautiful finish.

Your main concern when doing this is with any stain or dye you applied to the wood. In this case, you will want to apply at least two coats of finish before starting the sanding back. And, then be very careful that you don’t sand into the stain.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1496 posts in 1914 days


#14 posted 11-27-2018 03:28 PM

+1 search for grain fill, lots of videos out there.

For fine grain wood like mahogany when using simple poly finish, I like using BLO and sand paper to fill to grain. Watco natural Danish oil works as well, and will cure a little faster than BLO in cooler weather due oil/varnish blend. If you lightly scrape the surface cross grain to remove excess, can fill fine grain in one pass. Scrape to deep, and usually needs 2 passes to fill grain. The biggest drawback with this fill method, is time required to air cure BLO or Danish oil, before sanding flat and adding top coat.

For course/open grain wood like Walnut, or Oak, etc; I prefer to use commercial regular grain filler (like aqua coat for clear top coat, or Behlen’s water based if stain is used) as it is less work. Only need 1 maybe 2 applications to fill grain .vs. 3-4 passes with BLO. With these water based compounds, you can fill grain in few hours, and polyurethane top coat the next day if humidity is not too high. Here in dry desert SW, I can grain fill in morning, and apply first top coat in late afternoon. :)

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7487 posts in 3787 days


#15 posted 11-27-2018 06:08 PM

I have used Timbermate on a lot of projects and it has yet not let me down.
It works wonders on oak and other open grained woods I have used.
I have four of the different colors available and two containers of filler that I have colorized.
I filled some white oak with Timbermate that I had tinted to black and it looked a lot like zebra wood after sanding.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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